WikiLeaks Continues 'Vault 7' With New Documents Detailing Mac-Related CIA Exploits

ZapNZs

macrumors 68020
Jan 23, 2017
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The problem with this is they do not have a monopoly on this information. If they know of a exploit/bug there is a pretty good chance someone else does too. By not telling Apple and fixing the exploit they might be able to get what they want but they are also putting everyone else at risk as well.
You've touched on something that I find to be terrifying.

Many intelligence agencies have multiple roles that are often in direct conflict with each other. For example, advising other governmental agencies (or civilian companies/individuals) on safeguarding data (or closing discovered vulnerabilities) may be one, where as performing cryptoanalytical work to enabling spying may be another, and exploitive success could give rise to the very tools or knowledge used to undermine the safeguarding of such data, ultimately putting the very people at risk that the goal(s) aimed to protect.

How can such internal conflict ever be resolved?!
 

macsmurf

macrumors 65816
Aug 3, 2007
1,199
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If you're worried about the CIA you should probably be more worried about the chinese.
 

MH01

Suspended
Feb 11, 2008
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This could be partly why Apple is motivated to build their own (ARM-based) CPUs — so that they can have a brand new system design that is not susceptible to known compromises. They could lock down the boot process by having full control over how everything works together. Combine that with technology like Touch ID and a system would not even boot at all without passing physical identity verification. This is generally how iOS devices work today, so Apple is bringing this to the Mac.
It's called iPad Pro, and there are zero signs anything is being done about mac . Only thing about mac and macos is the neglect which makes this situation so much worse
 

Kabeyun

macrumors 68020
Mar 27, 2004
2,236
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Eastern USA
Well there you go folks. These are all spying devices. Probably the most harmful thing Apple has done is try to con their customers into thinking their gadgets are secure.
Please. Fearmongering relies on ignorance, so let's keep it to a minimum. macOS is the most secure major OS, and Apple's corporate goal is to sell gadgets & their services, not acquire data. This story is not a commentary on the security of macOS or iOS for the reasonably cautious customer against the average hacker, which is excellent. It's a commentary on the nefariousness and resourcefulness of the Central Intelligence Agency. Apple may go right on justifiably reassuring their customers and potential customers that they're fine to a reasonable extent if they take the simple security precautions they recommend. If you're targeted by the CIA bent on accessing your data, you're naïve if you think you have any recourse other than going back to using a typewriter and a calculator. And if a company says they can make you government-proof, they may have a bridge to sell you next.
 
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usarioclave

macrumors 65816
Sep 26, 2003
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If you're targeted by the CIA bent on accessing your data, you're naïve if you think you have any recourse other than going back to using a typewriter and a calculator.
To be perfectly accurate, even a typewriter isn't safe from the CIA. You can use both audio cues as well as just taking the used ribbon to figure out what was typed.
 

SlugBlanket

macrumors regular
Mar 5, 2011
130
7
Wikileaks is a known foreign enemy of the US who conducts cyber warfare. Not a public service.
Just because Wikileaks embarrasses the US Government by exposing stuff the same Government would rather not be exposed, does not make it an enemy. Mr Trump has caused more embarrassment to the US internationally than Wikileaks has thus far. Trump has certainly made America great again; a great laughing stock.
 

potatis

macrumors 6502a
Dec 9, 2006
806
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Didn't bother reading the article but the product image of space grey MBP with orange screen sure looks good.
 

lostngone

macrumors 65816
Aug 11, 2003
1,340
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Anchorage
If you're worried about the CIA you should probably be more worried about the chinese.
Why is that? China doesn't really care what you are doing on a personal level unless you are rich or powerful but your own government on the other hand has more of reason to watch what you are doing and make sure you are not stepping out of line.
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To be perfectly accurate, even a typewriter isn't safe from the CIA. You can use both audio cues as well as just taking the used ribbon to figure out what was typed.
Don't forget the typewriter roller as well.
 

citysnaps

macrumors 603
Oct 10, 2011
5,111
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Well there you go folks. These are all spying devices. Probably the most harmful thing Apple has done is try to con their customers into thinking their gadgets are secure.

Might as well just blog our life story, daily correspondence and inner secrets on Facebook and be done with it.

Where has Apple done that?

Did Apple make a claim that their devices, physically in the hands of government intelligence agencies, with relatively huge budgets, resources, and experts, are 100% secure and immune from being breached?

Please post a link where that claim was made.
 

MacBH928

macrumors 68040
May 17, 2008
3,359
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I think it is a little different when you are talking about this situation, considering you need physical access to the device.
.
Thats the ironic part, the govt. does have physical access. They will come and just pick your stuff up, especially during travel. Just try and tell that airport officer you will not hand over your computer to him to "check" it.
 

tennisproha

macrumors 65816
Jun 24, 2011
1,186
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Texas
Claims are not proofs. So no, there's no evidence.

The constitution of America was created to protect the people from government. That is why we flourish as a society.

Wikileaks is doing the same.
Wikileaks is not a US entity. Assange is not American. He couldn't careless about our rights or the US constitution of all things.

Combine this with the advancements in Artificial Intelligence and massively-powered computers can be doing the monitoring 24-7, and raising red flags when something is noticed. Then the "manpower" steps in to take a closer look.
That's science fiction for now.

Alot of it depends on how you view things. They certainly have a record of outing things the U.S. government (and many others) does not like. But it seems they just publish stuff others have given them. Kind of like how we found out about all the mass surveillance of the population done by the U.S. government when Mr. Snowden got that information out.

As security experts have said over and over - when it comes to computers, either everyone can be secure or nobody can. I'd much rather have all the exploits outed and our collective systems and security (for the country) made secure - from a strategic standpoint. Our intelligence agencies can operate around those barriers and still do their jobs (like they did before this was available to them), they're good....its just alot easier for them if there are holes in everyone's computer systems & they want to keep that.

From the standpoint of getting these holes patched for everyone, then this is good thing - this also proves the experts points about these security holes...they aren't just for our own use, they get out one way or the other to others who wish to do bad things to us via the weakened security of computer systems in our country (despite being very convenient for our 3 letter agencies to use as weapons...again their narrow focus). JMHO...
While I agree with you, the problem is that the public is being played for fools and people are just walking into it. There's a huge difference between Snowden and Assange. Snowden is an American citizen who exposed NSAs surveillance tactics to bring about a moral argument on the righteousness of it. Assange is a foreigner who selectively publishes documents that expose the US and it's citizens to foreign attacks. Snowden was a whistleblower. Assange is a cyber criminal. There's a huge difference between them that people are failing to grasp.

The reason for this is the propaganda Assange runs. Assange has no ties to the US. None whatsoever. He is no different than Osama bin Laden. Assange just selectively publishes hacked documents that were given to him presumably by foreign governments. And he has said publicly that he withholds publishing documents if they don't align with his motives. So he's a foreign national who publishes documents only pertaining to the US... hmm.

The reason it's worked so far is because of how he publishes them. He takes non-newsworthy items, hypes them, then publishes a massive hoard of documents at once. So in a mad rush, people scramble to dicipher their meaning. Well, he also published his own analysis of this hoard of documents. So out of haste, people take his analysis instead of doing their own. But weeks later, when all the documents are analyzed by private security firms, it turns out, the leak was just ********. This is EXACTLY what happened with the Vault 7 leak. Assange leaked a massive hoard, along with his own analysis. People took him at his word because it was too big to analyze in one day. Weeks later, private security firms released their own analysis saying all the leaks were stuff that was already known to them and the public. Most were old loopholes that were long plugged or already known and in no way a threat to Average Joe. But by then people had moved on. I kid you not. This is what happened. Go back and read the official comprehensive analysis, not the newsbites.

I will say that on your last point, the intelligence agencies need to better protect themselves. There's no excuse for that.

"Intelligence Community partners" seems to imply collusion or coercion of the freight forwarders and shipping companies because the spooks need to know when and to whom shipments are being sent.

One way Cisco could avoid this massive octopus would be to offshore their production from the USA.

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Actually neither the CIA nor the NSA have a remit for domestic spying, that's the FBIs job.

Problem is that it is ever more difficult to prevent these agencies from doing domestic work and catching them at it.

Risk is that these agencies, with cyber exploits are much more able to scale their activities both horizontally and vertically against domestic targets.

This is how turn-key surveillance becomes available to a potentially despotic administration.
While this is true, it's also true that the intelligence agencies are a machine in and of itself. A despot can't really mold them at will, at least in the US. They are a separate entity that the president doesn't really have command over.

Just because Wikileaks embarrasses the US Government by exposing stuff the same Government would rather not be exposed, does not make it an enemy. Mr Trump has caused more embarrassment to the US internationally than Wikileaks has thus far. Trump has certainly made America great again; a great laughing stock.
You have to ask yourself what is Wikileaks, more specifically Assange's, motive. Assange has no relation to the US whatsoever. He's as foreign as Osama bin Laden. So he's certainly not doing it to protect your rights.
 

iapplelove

macrumors 601
Nov 22, 2011
4,780
6,140
East Coast USA
Claims are not proofs. So no, there's no evidence.
No evidence? Sure there is evidence, plenty of it. They are using a program called "night sky". And it does infect factory fresh iPhones. They infiltrated the supply chains.

In 20 minutes of researching I found enough info on night sky that proved enough evidence for me.
 
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crashoverride77

macrumors 65816
Jan 27, 2014
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Well there you go folks. These are all spying devices. Probably the most harmful thing Apple has done is try to con their customers into thinking their gadgets are secure.

Might as well just blog our life story, daily correspondence and inner secrets on Facebook and be done with it.
So we established you have no clue? Welcome to mac rumors, you will love it here.
 

H2SO4

macrumors 601
Nov 4, 2008
4,350
3,740
What is? Apple's thoughts on the iPad getting PC viruses? or physical vulnerabilities of a Mac? If it is the latter, then I wouldn't fault Apple for this, unless it is something they allowed/knew about.
All of it, but especially the first part.
Apple have used this 'PC viruses' thing before. They were talking about Macs at the time.
Now Timmy knows that the vast majority of people do not know that a virus, worm, trojan etc are different but ALL are still malware. He also knows that if he uses the term PC viruses that he is being specific but at the same time he is actually telling Joe Public that Macs don't suffer from malware.
 

vertical smile

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2014
3,915
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All of it, but especially the first part.
Apple have used this 'PC viruses' thing before. They were talking about Macs at the time.
Now Timmy knows that the vast majority of people do not know that a virus, worm, trojan etc are different but ALL are still malware. He also knows that if he uses the term PC viruses that he is being specific but at the same time he is actually telling Joe Public that Macs don't suffer from malware.
I have never seen any ads for the Mac stating the same thing as the iPad, but I wouldn't be surprised if there were some out there.

I bought up the iPad ad because I have been seeing it a lot lately, and it is clearly misleading.
 

H2SO4

macrumors 601
Nov 4, 2008
4,350
3,740
I have never seen any ads for the Mac stating the same thing as the iPad, but I wouldn't be surprised if there were some out there.

I bought up the iPad ad because I have been seeing it a lot lately, and it is clearly misleading.
Yep, One of the "I’m a Mac, I’m a PC' ads did at least and I remember seeing something in print too. Found this also…..
http://www.wired.co.uk/article/macs-get-viruses
 

bigchief

macrumors 6502a
Feb 26, 2009
872
167
Again, it shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone that the Central Intelligence Agency has tools to conduct espionage. It's literally their job description. This has been known for a long time. These Wikileaks revelation just state the obvious. So calm down everyone.

No, the CIA in not spying on you. These tools are used for statecraft, espionage, and terrorism threats. The CIA doesn't care about the porn you have on your Mac. Calm down.

The CIA does not spy on its own citizens en-masse either. They don't have the manpower. The NSA however is a different and separate story.

This is another rouse to get you riled up like last time. No actual tools were released. Just the knowledge that the CIA possesses the ability, which we already knew. No big deal. Calm down.

Bull ****!
 
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Yr Blues

macrumors 68020
Jan 14, 2008
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Wikileaks is not a US entity. Assange is not American. He couldn't careless about our rights or the US constitution of all things.
Imagine if an American uncovered some corruption in China and published the findings so their citizens could see it.

Imagine some shill in China saying they can't trust some American for publishing evidence of corruption in their own country.

That's pretty much you.
 
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Tech198

macrumors G5
Mar 21, 2011
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Sonic screwdriver .... I like these awesome names ... :D

The thing about this is Apple is of course always gonna say "It's been fixed" because they own the software and hardware, they know how it all works....

So, basically Apple is going head-to-head against all those smart users.

Is Apple telling the truth, or perhaps they say this because they don't want *their own* users to worry. I would rather believe the larger population than a one company..

All you gotta do is look at how much effort Apple won't blame themselves, till u give them a 'Chinese-burn' to see what i mean.
 
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tennisproha

macrumors 65816
Jun 24, 2011
1,186
620
Texas
Imagine if an American uncovered some corruption in China and published the findings so their citizens could see it.

Imagine some shill in China saying they can't trust some American for publishing evidence of corruption in their own country.

That's pretty much you.
You don't have to imagine, it's already been done.

The problem with your scenario is that Assange didn't uncover any corruption. He just stated the obvious with a heavy dose of spin. Nothing we already didn't know.

NEWSFLASH: The Central Intelligence Agency has tools for espionage! :rolleyes: