Will Georgia Kill an Innocent Man?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by latergator116, Jul 14, 2007.

  1. adroit macrumors 6502

    adroit

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    #2
  2. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    what an unfortunate result from congress passing laws to limit what judges are able to do in their own courtrooms. and this whole "activist judges" non-sense has real consequences, as we can see.

    seems to me that whenever people get all uppity about "delaying justice", and complaining about too many appeals, they're assuming everyone on trial is guilty.
     
  3. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #4
    The sad part is that the law denying him a fair appeal was brought about by the incredible number of frivolous appeals. Too many "Not guilty on account of a misplaced comma." appeals.

    His only hope at this point, looks like, is the governor's office. A problem there is making the governor aware of a situation, without some intermediary's preconceived notions. I'm regularly reminded of Jonathan Swift's "flappers", from "Gulliver's Travels".

    'Rat
     
  4. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #5
    was it? or was it brought on by the perception of too many frivolous appeals?
     
  5. Swarmlord macrumors 6502a

    Swarmlord

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    #6
    If there's any doubt as to the guilt of a person, I don't feel that he or she should be executed. Sounds like some further investigation is warranted for this one.
     
  6. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #7
    zim, from skimming through numerous newspaper articles about appeals, through the years, it seems like the first appeal might well be reasonable. But all too often, the so-called grounds for subsequent appeals are indeed made-up frivolities.

    Now, not all of the attorneys could be incompetent. It seems to me that a competent attorney would find pretty much all reasonable cause for abeyance or retrial or whatever during the first go-'round. So, you wind up with appeals which are nothing more than delaying tactics to stave off that last and final day.

    I guesss separately, as to the duties and requirements placed upon judges, they should be guidelines, not absolutes. I don't like absolute-minimum sentences; I don't like the idea that a judge could be prohibited from a review of a case.

    In a case like this, where both witnesses and jurors are speaking out, a review should be mandatory. (Much the same as the Branch Davidian trial at San Antonio, post-Waco. Jurors quickly went public with claims of having been misled by the trial judge.)

    'Rat
     
  7. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #8
    Well, when you're going to kill someone, you probably want to be as close to absolutely certain before you throw the switch.

    Of course the simple solution would be to stop executing people.
     
  8. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #9
    I don't object to the death penalty as such. I do object to it on the grounds that people have been erroneously sentenced. And, since it costs more tax dollars because of all the appeals process, life W/O parole is cheaper.

    And locked in a cage forever seems to me to be more cruel than death. Locked in a cage sure ain't what I'd call living...

    'Rat
     

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