Will the iPhone 5 have lower resolution?

FooArk

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 16, 2011
369
7
Given that the screen is taller, will it lose the retina display?
 

Menel

macrumors 603
Aug 4, 2011
6,202
1,057
Given that the screen is taller, will it lose the retina display?
It definitely won't lose any resolution.
It might lose a hair of pixel density, but without doing any math, it should still be over 300ppi. Like maybe 325 vs. 326.

edit: actually running the math, rumors say 1136x640 on a 3.54" screen, exactly the same 326ppi.
 
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mcaddict

macrumors member
Apr 26, 2010
38
0
Switzerland
The pixel density won't change. It will be the exact same.
This. They're not spreading a given amount of pixels over a taller screen, they're adding additional rows of pixels and the density will remain the same, keeping retina...
 
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Dwalls90

macrumors 601
Feb 5, 2009
4,713
1,083
No. They're adding pixels to the top/bottom as well as increasing the screen size. The screen ratio will change from 3:2 to 16:9, though.

Same PPI, with 4".
 

acorntoy

macrumors 65816
May 25, 2010
1,414
1,258
Exactly! They're not spreading a given amount of pixels over a taller screen, they're adding additional rows of pixels and the density will remain the same...
The resolution will be changing to keep the pixel density the same.

It'll still be 320-330 ppi "retina"

But it'll be changed to 1136x640 to do that, that on the current iphone would be like 400-500 ppi.
 

JerseyDoug

macrumors regular
May 10, 2012
248
4
The resolution will be changing to keep the pixel density the same.

It'll still be 320-330 ppi "retina"

But it'll be changed to 1136x640 to do that, that on the current iphone would be like 400-500 ppi.
I am confused. How can constant density equal a change in ppi? Ppi is density. What am I missing? :confused:
 

Cougarcat

macrumors 604
Sep 19, 2003
7,766
2,546
I am confused. How can constant density equal a change in ppi? Ppi is density. What am I missing? :confused:
He was just saying that if the same 3.5" screen got the extra pixels the new iPhone will have, it's ppi/density would increase. But since the new screen will be 4" it'll remain the same.
 

acorntoy

macrumors 65816
May 25, 2010
1,414
1,258
I am confused. How can constant density equal a change in ppi? Ppi is density. What am I missing? :confused:

A screens resolution and screen size makes its pixel density.

So a 1280x720 32" tv has a higher ppi than a 1280x720 50" because the same amount of pixels would have to be spread out more.

If apple wants to keep the same 326 ppi in the next iphone ( which they probably will) with the increased screen size they will need to increase the amount of pixels from 960 x 640 to 1136 x 640 ( or around that ), more pixels but because of the increase screen size the pixels will still be 326 ppi