Witnessing the Extinction of a (Sub)species

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by bradl, Nov 23, 2015.

  1. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2008
    #1
    Yes, this sounds like overdramatization and clickbait, but in all brutal honesty, we will be seeing this within the next few years.

    With that, it's shocking how with one death, your entire population of your species can decrease; in this case, by 25%.

    From NPR and WashPo:

    We laugh and joke about the Dodo bird from back in the early 1900s; well, we're going to have our version of it really soon. :(

    BL.
     
  2. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    #2
    Playing devil's advocate here. And I'll be cruelly blunt about it: so what? So a sub species of the rhinos dies out. What does this really mean? If we didn't read about it on the net, would it really matter? Animals have gone extinct for millions of years....etc etc
     
  3. sim667 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    #3
    There's a difference between natural extinction and hunted to extinction, white rhino's have been by and large hunted to extinction during the colonialist era's and more recently by trophy hunters.
     
  4. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    #4
    I get the difference. Just playing DA, and asking how does that change our world besides the hurt feelings. Extinction happens, naturally or not, as long as it's not a species crucial to the circle of life, does it affect us?
     
  5. juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

    Joined:
    May 1, 2006
    Location:
    Fury 161
    #5
    So what if ISIS kills people? Scientists are always saying that there's too many people on the planet anyway, right? As long as it doesn't affect me...
     
  6. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    #6
    Animals die all the time. You missed the point of my question.
     
  7. juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

    Joined:
    May 1, 2006
    Location:
    Fury 161
    #7
    What we're seeing now is not animals dying, but a mass extinction.
     
  8. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #8
    I always pity the dolts that cannot find anything wrong with man created extinction of species. They selfishly admit they don't care because it doesn't impact them directly. I prefer to see these animals exist for future generations to enjoy and co-exist with on the planet and enjoy nature. Rather than destroy we should live up to our potential to thrive without destruction of other species. Then again, those that don't care are quick on my list to hopefully not pass their lack of culture to offspring.
     
  9. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    #9
    I always pity people who can't take a chance to educate people who are clearly asking for some knowledge, even admitting that they are playing devils advocate and are so cowardly can't even directly respond to people, instead post a generic, insulting response that does nothing more than make them feel superior to other people they deem lesser than them.
     
  10. sim667 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    #10
    This isn't a case of animals dying, this is a case of humans having killed enough of that particular animal to wipe them off the face of the earth.

    And they're not even killed for survival, they're killed for trophies or for useless chinese medicine.
     
  11. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #11
    I beg to differ; this is not a "mass extinction."
     
  12. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #12
    Nice to play with semantics. Let's try mass extinction of a particular species or sub-species. Better?
     
  13. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #13
    No, let's try "extinction of a single sub-species." There is no other accurate description. "Mass" does not come into play here.
     
  14. juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

    Joined:
    May 1, 2006
    Location:
    Fury 161
    #14
    According to experts, we're currently at the beginning of a mass extinction, hence my choice of words. It's only logical, actually, considering that as many have stated here, species either have an economical value for us, or they are just taking up space and ressources that could be funnelled into a species that does have value. One example would be the annihilation of rainforest (habitat to many fragile species) to make room for palm oil plantation.
     
  15. ProjectManager101 Suspended

    ProjectManager101

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2015
    #15
    Do not waste your time. If someone kills him I bet many people would be glad where he lives and we wouldn't have to waste time explaining things he just does not get. He just like to play that game and that is why the world is like that, for people who is arrogant and does not care. Lack of common sense to say the least?
     
  16. Scepticalscribe, Jan 20, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #16
    Actually, to be fair, to @Mac'nCheese - rather than seeking refuge in outrage, this is a fair question to ask.

    While I largely agree with you, it goes far further than that.

    Unfortunately, it is. And it is the only mass extinction that has come about through the direct and deliberate agency of another species, - namely, us, our good selves - rather than through something such as an asteroid, or dramatic climate change or other 'external' event.

    Addressing the consequence of the enormous and transformative effect and impact of our species on the planet - which is far more extensive and much more comprehensive than that any other species, ever, in terms of transforming the planet, and moulding it to our needs, means looking at what we do, and what we have done to deliberately - and inadvertently - give rise to mass extinctions.

    Our actions have included deliberately killing - and thus, wiping out - some species, and sacrificing others heedlessly and needlessly, or inadvertently - to our needs, sometimes citing religious authority to do so.

    Rarely have we sought to exterminate a species deliberately - although that has happened, too - rather, the extinction is more often a result of the fact that we have systematically killed a sufficient number of the species in question, either intentionally, or inadvertently, as a consequence of other actions.

    However, we cannot pretend that our actions, and our almost complete dominion of the planet don't have consequences, many of them most unfortunate for the life forms we collide with.

    Nevertheless, @Mac'nCheese does pose a question that has a right to be asked, and one that ought to be asked, - if only of ourselves - rather than howled down in outrage, real and simulated: So, what? So, what, if animals die, or a species that is extraordinary in appearance but clearly redundant evolutionarily dies out? Is death not our common fate? Does evolution not bid adieu to other life forms, and other species, sometimes even more brutally than we have managed in our stewardship of parts of the planet?

    These are valid questions, and ones we need to ask honestly of ourselves. Much of the debate on animal welfare is clothed in the vocabulary of anthropomorphism and steeped in sentimentality.

    However, slaughtering our way across the planet in pursuit of commercial and other imperatives also begs questions, questions of the responsibility that comes with power and an understanding of the consequences of destroying the world that has given rise to us.

    Thus, it is wrong, not just because, as @phrehdd has commented that he would 'prefer if future generations could enjoy nature and co-exist with nature' - though being able to recognise and respect the life that takes other forms is hugely important, - but also because our planet so far has survived through diversity and has been able to adapt to climatic and environmental change through its rich diversity of plant and animal life.

    By annihilating diversity, - as happens every time we destroy another species - we ultimately damage ourselves and the chance of the planet we live on to survive us.
     

Share This Page