Would you pay more for your electronics if they were not made in sweatshops?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Ice Dragon, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. Ice Dragon macrumors 6502a

    Ice Dragon

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    #1
    And if so, where would you draw the line? How much more would you pay? Provided of course that the products are made better and able to withstand more.
     
  2. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #2
    I pay more for food that's not factory farmed, so of course I would pay more for electronics not made in sweatshops.
     
  3. blevins321 macrumors 68030

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    #3
    I personally support globalization for manufacturing. (Liberal otherwise haha). Especially if the design of the devices is done domestically. I've seen a few Chinese-designed knockoffs of major products and they border on the pathetic.
     
  4. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    Ive paid more for domestically made musical instruments, I would probably pay more if I knew it was employing local workers.
     
  5. twietee macrumors 603

    twietee

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    Yes, I would. Actually with like...everything. Clothes, food, furniture why not electronics. But I don't quite understand the rest of your question. Why does it have inevitably to be better and withstand more?
     
  6. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    He said nothing about globalization.
     
  7. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    I imagine many of us here are Mac users ... so we've already demonstrated a willingness to pay more for a product.

    Better is better.

    ----------

    I agree. The question then becomes would you pay more for a better product?

    Of course.

    I think the question should be all else being equal, would you pay more for a product not made in a sweatshop.

    But then the problem is what defines a sweatshop?

    Is there a union? Is it located in the U.S.A.?

    I'd like some clarity on this.
     
  8. filmbuff macrumors 6502a

    filmbuff

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    Yes, I would pay more. If an iPad was $510 instead of $500 would that really keep people from buying one? That extra $10 per iPad would go a long way for working conditions.
     
  9. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    It could be a marketing gimmick ... $10 of this purchase goes to ensuring that the people who made this iPad work in safe conditions.
     
  10. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #10
    Somehow I think slave labor factors in a heck of a lot more than a measly $10 savings for manufacturing...
     
  11. Eraserhead, Sep 9, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012

    Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #11
    There is no slave labour, this is utter hyperbole.

    That is true some of the time, but some stuff designed in China is actually to a pretty decent quality.
     
  12. q64ceo macrumors regular

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    #12
    9/10 people will say "yes", but when offered with that scenario only 1/10 will actually follow through. We Americans ALWAYS go for the lowest price goods. Hell, look at gas stations. You have two gas stations on the same street. One of them offers gas for 5 cents cheaper than the other, and they have lines all the way around the corner while the other one is pretty damn empty.

    Americans bitch because we like to bitch about anything.
     
  13. twietee macrumors 603

    twietee

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    #13
    Don't know if the term slave is utterly correct, but I'm sure that mining for coltan in the congo is inhuman.

    I don't know about the states, but there are quite a lot of people here in Europe spending a lot of money for adequately produced food-not enough but still. If there would be a properly controlled system that makes sure my 10,20,100 € are used to improve working conditions, why not? And if the price gets too hefty, well it's not as if Apple for example couldn't do without some of their profits. Things like this are great marketing as long it's not just lip service.
     
  14. q64ceo macrumors regular

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    We Americans are highly materialistic. We judge others based upon what they have. We are addicted to buying crap. If we bought straight American electronics the prices could not even come close. For example, I have an iMac, an Apple TV, an iPad, and an iPhone. If all of those were made in the states I would probably just have the iPhone because of the expense. That would be very unacceptable for our materialistic culture.

    Until we consumers come to terms with our addiction to materialism then we can never stop buying sweatshop made products.
     
  15. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #15
    True, and mining for gold in Mongolia is pretty bad too, but you know at least we are at a level of development where it is safe enough that sending the white guy from Britain there is safe enough.

    The percentage of workers who those conditions apply to in China is increasingly negligible, and I don't believe that applies to any of the workers in Apple's supply chain.
     
  16. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

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    #16
    Have you seen the que outside Foxconn for a job??? Some sweat shop!
     
  17. Ice Dragon thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Ice Dragon

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    #17
    It doesn't have to be made in the USA though if you're going to pay more for a product, you don't want it to be the same quality as something you can buy in Wal Mart for half the price or almost half the price. A union is fine though is not required, just so much as the workers are paid fair wages, given vacation time, etc.

    I know I would rather work for one of these places than work where I currently work (unfortunately I don't believe any all USA goods shops are available where I live).

    Hope this clears up some questions. I'm impressed at the responses this topic got. Keep it up please. : )
     
  18. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #18
    What defines sweatshops?

    Working for the minimal pay possible, 18+ hour shifts, mininal or almost non existent breaks, health hazards, and etc. What exactly fits the criteria?

    Work places of all kind exist everywhere. Even the worst workplaces exist in countries like America.

    Also can you distinguish a real difference from sweatshop vs slave labor? How many of us know real hunger or have nothing? Most of us were taught slavery as the violent forceful aspect but not in the form of using the helpless and desperate.

    I myself would love to support good working conditions. But that's like going to a supermarket and trying to find food that doesn't include corn syrup. So even if Apple made stuff in the US and had unionized members with good pay and all the perks, where do the screws and the machinery to make the products come from? Where does the tools, AC and heating units come from? No matter how you try to avoid it, everything that's mass produced has a dark side.
     
  19. Ice Dragon, Sep 9, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012

    Ice Dragon thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Ice Dragon

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    #19
    Yeah you make a good point there. Sometimes it can be tough when you are shopping and you see items that are "Made in the USA" and "Assembled in the USA." Made I believe means from the materials to the labor in most cases. Assembled means that the labor might be domestic but the items might be foreign.

    It's important that both things are good. You can have good workers who are well paid and everything though if you have lousy materials, the products will be lousy no matter how much pride the workers have.

    Food is different issue that I would like to discuss via PM. So tell me more about processed food. I'm not perfect with my diet (no one is and it's impossible to be), though I feel if I minimize fast/processed food than I should be okay. My main enemies are carbs and salt (salt especially so I have to watch that).

    I'll need time to think about what I define as a sweatshop but a quick response would be a corporation such as Nike paying kids $0.20 an hour in South America to make shoes that they sell for $150.00

    I personally cannot distinguish much of a difference. Although I suppose in Foxconn's case, the people go where the jobs are. They have a choice to go in, though you don't hear much about getting out if that's even an option.

    And as far as sweatshops go in America. Absolutely... if a business can hire cheap workers to save money. They will do just that. Sacrifice quality for profits. Generally isn't that they choose to outsource, though?
     
  20. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

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    #20
    As greedy as it is, for me it's about quality.

    For the exact same product would I pay more? No.
    For better quality? Yes.

    I don't buy enough to make a difference anyways. I buy clothes maybe once or twice a year, I buy a new computer every 4 years. The closest thing to a sweatshop that I buy from are EA games.
     
  21. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    God YES.

    When building computers its a massive pain to find parts made in Taiwan or Europe instead of China. It's bordering on impossible now to build a non-Chinese manufactured custom PC.
     
  22. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    Probably because the like the work, but they do still go home e.g. (http://www.economist.com/node/21548273).

    How could it not be?

    I don't believe Nike employs any kids in South America.
     
  23. Ice Dragon thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Ice Dragon

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    #23
    Forgive my ignorance there. Perhaps it's because I only hear of the extreme examples of workers killing themselves hence why they installed the nets.

    Is there a link to an interview of someone who used to work for Foxconn and voluntarily quit for whatever reason?

    The NFL jerseys are made in places such as El Salvador and Honduras. If they don't employ children, they probably employ teenagers. Then again perhaps in those countries, the labor laws are different and kids can work a lot more than in North America.

    Also one more thing in this topic. No posting links to facepalm pictures. I want to be educated not ostracized. : P
     
  24. Eraserhead, Sep 9, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012

    Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #24
    Killing themselves at a significantly lower rate than the statistical norm in the US, Britain or China.

    I'm sure there are in the Chinese media.

    I was considering South America to not include such places as they are technically in North America ;). It is true that there is the possibility of child labour in those countries.
     
  25. Ice Dragon thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Ice Dragon

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    #25


    I'll have to seek them out.



    Fair enough. Central America then but south of the USA. I guess I considered it South America since I feel North America is the United States and Canada (as well as Puerto Rico).

    Been a long time since geography class. : P
     

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