Wow Retina iPad 3 Wallpapers work with the iPad 2

iostehk

macrumors member
Original poster
May 12, 2011
50
0
Atlanta
I was just curious to see if the wallpapers designed for The New iPad would work on my iPad 2 and what do you know the resolution looks 10 times better than the original 1024x1024!

So give it a try you wont be disappointed!

(For those still using the iPad 2)

My favorite source for wallpaper is in the link below
http://interfacelift.com/wallpaper/downloads/date/any/

It will look blurry for a couple of seconds then it will render then just tap set as wallpaper.:apple:

Please note this doesn't change the resoulution of your ipad 2 just makes wallpapers more crisp!
 

IllIllIll

macrumors 65816
Oct 2, 2011
1,049
216
A 2048x2048 image fitted to an iPad2's 1024x768 screen should look no better or worse than the same image with a native resolution of 1024x1024. The limiting factor is the resolution of the iPad's screen, and you can't add more detail just because the image has a higher resolution. You're just wasting storage space.
 

seadragon

Contributor
Mar 10, 2009
1,449
1,554
2048x2048 has 4 times as many pixels as 1024x1024. That's not 'nothing'.
So, does this mean they should have put 2 gigs in the new iPad so that it is 4 times that of the iPad 2? They quadrupled the pixels but only doubled the RAM.

Hmmmm...
 

IllIllIll

macrumors 65816
Oct 2, 2011
1,049
216
So, does this mean they should have put 2 gigs in the new iPad so that it is 4 times that of the iPad 2? They quadrupled the pixels but only doubled the RAM.

Hmmmm...
Why? Mapping 3 million pixels will easily fit in 1GB of RAM with room to spare. Relationship between RAM and screen resolution is not linear.
 

applesith

macrumors 68030
Jun 11, 2007
2,659
1,070
Manhattan
What do you mean it won't change the resolution of my screen?! I thought I could just put a big picture on my old iPad and it will create pixels!! I'm so mad.
 

oli356

macrumors 6502
Sep 6, 2010
250
0
2048x2048 has 4 times as many pixels as 1024x1024. That's not 'nothing'.
For one image... The point of more RAM is so it can handle games which run at this res and stuff.. Not just a single image.. iPad 2 has like 500MB of RAM? Not like 10.
 

iostehk

macrumors member
Original poster
May 12, 2011
50
0
Atlanta
All of the back and forth

Has anyone with a ipad 2 tried it yet theres a big difference in how sharp the wallpaper is!
 

JasonHD

macrumors regular
Jul 23, 2010
122
0
Has anyone with a ipad 2 tried it yet theres a big difference in how sharp the wallpaper is!
Hello

Yes I tried it and it looks equally as good. Maybe the original image you used for your non retina iPad underwent compression that wasted some quality. Then when u put the high quality wallpaper, it seems better yet it is still only at the resolution of the non retina device. Try obtaining a wallpaper from the same source, one for each device and switch between them. Keep everything constant and limit variables! I tried it several times and still looks as good, no different!!

Most importantly... If you think it looks better then that's all that matters!

J
 

Yggbert

macrumors regular
Jul 22, 2011
153
0
Of course they do, they're higher resolution.

You don't need a high res display to appreciate higher resolution media you know, not when it's digital stuff like this, it's like how if you throw up a 720P MKV onto a 55" 720P TV (example) it will look worse than a 1080P MKV on the same TV.

Go find an image that's the same res as your monitor, then find another one that's the same image but much higher resolution. It'll look better. It's that simple.

Higher the res, the more sharp it'll look. While you won't see more detail it'll still look sharper.
 

IllIllIll

macrumors 65816
Oct 2, 2011
1,049
216
Higher the res, the more sharp it'll look. While you won't see more detail it'll still look sharper.
Wrong. Sharpness is a function of resolution and contrast. A photo originally taken at 4096x4096, downscaled to 2048x2048 and 1024x1024, will all look identical on a 1024x768 display.
 
Last edited:

Yggbert

macrumors regular
Jul 22, 2011
153
0
Wrong. Sharpness is a function of resolution and contrast. A photo originally taken at 4096x4096, downscaled to 2048x2048 and 1024x1024, will all look identical on a 1024x768 display.
Higher res content can still look better on a screen that doesn't support the full resolution of said content. Hence why I specifically stated the difference between 720P and 1080P MKVs on a TV that is only technically capable of 720P resolution.

If you just downscale an image to a much, much smaller size then of course the differences become indistinguishable, I wouldn't dispute that.
 

IllIllIll

macrumors 65816
Oct 2, 2011
1,049
216
Higher res content can still look better on a screen that doesn't support the full resolution of said content. Hence why I specifically stated the difference between 720P and 1080P MKVs on a TV that is only technically capable of 720P resolution.
Still doesn't make a difference. There are only X number of pixels on a fixed resolution screen that can be displayed at once.

The difference you report seeing between 720p and 1080p video may have more to do with the fact that you're comparing video and not still pictures. With video, there are more factors to consider such as motion blur, quality of the scaler in the display, etc., but higher resolution alone is not inherently sharper or more detailed when downscaled. Ask the experts over on AVS Forum and they'll tell you the same thing.
 

iMacDragon

macrumors 68000
Oct 18, 2008
1,716
283
UK
The maximum amount of pixels displayed by the iPad 2 is still 1024x768. No matter what image is being displayed.
I think the question is more how does the wallpaper get kept in memory. I would expect it gets rendered to a 1024x768 bitmap and kept seperate to the original image, considering when I imported backup from my old ipad it imported low res wallpaper with it.
 

Trepex

macrumors 6502a
Apr 5, 2007
622
0
Ottawa, Canada
Higher res content can still look better on a screen that doesn't support the full resolution of said content. Hence why I specifically stated the difference between 720P and 1080P MKVs on a TV that is only technically capable of 720P resolution.

If you just downscale an image to a much, much smaller size then of course the differences become indistinguishable, I wouldn't dispute that.
This is so incredibly incorrect I don't know where to start. The best image is one pixel-matched because there is no up/down-scaling to view it, like there is for viewing a 1080p video on a 720p screen. You don't have the pixels to take advantage of the 1080p video. The ONLY reason a 1080p video could look better would be if compression were worse on the 720p version.