You might want to wait for Sandy Bridge in Q2+ 2011 instead of buying Westmere

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by c.hilding, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. c.hilding, Jun 10, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011

    c.hilding macrumors member

    c.hilding

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    #1
    It should be clear to everyone by now that we have entered the era of the iDevices (iPhones and iPads). Steve Jobs' zeal on stage while talking about the iPad and now the iPhone 4 shows that he's on a tunnel-vision crusade. Apple is concentrating all their efforts on becoming the market leader in this new field. Heck, they didn't even give ONE Apple Design Award to a Mac application this year, despite this being a traditional award given out every year to the best MAC applications. Suddenly, it's all about the iDevice toys... Portable consumer devices for browsing the internet and checking email are expected to overtake computers completely by 2015, to a point where content creators and gamers will be the only people still using desktop machines. They also predict that most applications and services will be in that disgusting "cloud" thing which requires Internet connectivity just to access apps. I don't really believe either of those predictions, but that doesn't matter, Apple (and when I say Apple I mean Steve Jobs) is dead-set on shaping, grooming and dominating this new market.

    So... it's been over 460 days since the last update to the Mac Pro, which is highly unusual, and of course this massive delay (along with Intel starting mass production of Westmere Xeons now, June) lead everybody to the highly logical conclusion that we should expect new Mac Pros at WWDC '10, which as we know didn't happen... Did you hear the developer-audience's cheers at "one more thing", only to be let down by a damn video chat application? The audience consists mainly of professional developers who depend on Mac Pros in their offices, and this iToy business was a huge slap in their faces by Apple. It's clear that WWDC is no longer a developer convention, as far as the keynotes go. It's now a marketing arm of Apple, designed to create cute Steve Jobs-quotes and video clips to feed to the consumer public via the massive amounts of press that hang out at the event. Heck, if anyone doubts Steve's tunnel vision; Steve Jobs can't even promise that we'll get Apple Design Awards for Mac DESKTOP APPLICATIONS next year either (note the emphasis on "Maybe"). There should be NO question about what Steve Jobs' latest baby is, and it's NOT the Mac desktops.

    Waiting for new Pro machines is of course made even more painful by Mac Pro 2009's insane prices. Apple could at least drop the current price! You can build your own Hackintosh with the exact same components as the current Mac Pro 2009s for less than half the price using easily accessible off-the-shelf parts. To top it off, the current machines were released over 460 days ago, and have kept the same price for all this time despite being overpriced even back then (the 2009 Mac Pros actually cost Apple a lot less to manufacture than the 2008 models due to much lower CPU prices, yet Apple significantly raised the price of the 2009 models), it's insanity... It has gone far enough that lots of people that used to despise Hackintoshes have actually considered building one of their own, since Apple has completely dropped the ball. Heck, they've thrown the ball away! Over 460 days without updates so far, and no price reductions... jeeze.

    This new iToys-horny Apple is giving me a headache.

    So WWDC came and went without any news of new Mac Pros. However, today, June 10th, Steve Jobs confirmed that Apple has NOT forgotten about the Mac Pros and that we'll have to "wait and see". Updates are coming. What you'll have to ask yourself is if you should buy now or wait for Sandy Bridge.

    See, on April 13th, 2010, Intel's CEO announced that they will begin mass-producing their latest architecture, Sandy Bridge, in Q4 2010:
    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2362601,00.asp

    Server-versions (Xeons) of Sandy Bridge will follow a few months later, around April+ (Q2) 2011.

    Basically, to get the most out of your buck, you have these choices:

    If you have a perfectly good workstation now and can use it until April+ 2011, then wait. You'll be getting Sandy Bridge's USB3, LightPeak, SATA3, PCI Express 3.0 (twice the bandwidth), native support for 1600 MHz RAM, 8 cores per processor, and higher performance, and it'll be a much better buy than ANY Westmere of today (which is merely a die-shrink of November 2008's Nehalem).

    If you don't have a workstation now but need one, then either get a Westmere Mac Pro workstation when they come out if you don't mind the entire architecture becoming obsolete in 9-10 months (as opposed to just a die-shrink such as Nehalem -> Westmere), or get something cheaper for now such as last year's technology; either via a refurb, second-hand or a cheap Hackintosh. I'll most likely hit this camp. They are still powerful machines and will be excellent to tide you over into 2011, where you'll be able to get the vastly superior Sandy Bridge (SB) architecture <-- (click for unrelated relaxation with "SB" :p).

    If you don't have a need for a workstation now, but want one later, then wait for Sandy Bridge and use something like an iMac, MacBook or Mac Mini for now.

    As some apologists will point out, of course Nehalem/Westmere will still be incredibly powerful as far as CPU performance goes after Sandy Bridge is released, but it will no longer have the latest technology, and we're talking about groundbreaking things like USB3, SATAIII, LightPeak and PCI Express 3.0 (which both doubles the bandwidth over 2.0 and has many more lanes per CPU, giving you more PCI Express ports in the computer), where we'll eventually have devices and cards that require these ports. Wouldn't you rather have a computer that contains the ports that are about to become the new standards? Anyone who doesn't at least look over the implications of buying now versus waiting is foolish. This is a completely new architecture right around the corner, with multiple new standards technologies, things that will just be in more and more demand as modern devices are released that will require USB3, SATAIII, LightPeak or PCI Express 3.0. It's your money and I'm not saying you shouldn't buy a Westmere Mac now. As I said, it's perfectly fine to buy a Westmere now as long as you know what you're getting into.


    Responses to a couple of possible objections:

    Q: Who cares?
    A: I'm glad you asked that. Depending on who you are, this might not be interesting to you at all, but for the rest of us, this factor of a whole heap of emerging technology should at least be taken into account before spending 3 years of saved up cash on a fully loaded Westmere Mac, when you could buy a second-hand/refurb/make a Hackintosh to tide you over until the real quantum leap with Sandy Bridge. Unless you are made of money, that will be a much wiser choice. I happen to be made of money and I still won't be buying any fully kitted out Westmere, it's just not a wise choice with such a quantum leap coming up quite soon. The best thing to do is just to get something to get by with while waiting; and the current machines are very powerful, so a refurb/second-hand/Hackintosh will be the best choice for most people.

    Q: But... but... Westmere has 6 cores instead of 4, isn't that better?
    A: Those that need the 4 extra cores (from 2x4 (8) to 2x6 (12)) are free to buy a Westmere now, if they really need it, but even most editors would get by excellently with the 2009 Mac Pro. As for Westmere (6 cores) vs Nehalem (4 cores), the performance is negligible since most applications cannot even use more than 1 or 2 cores simultaneously. Come back when programs are written to use "n" number of cores without bottlenecks and I'll say your NEHALEM will come to use (let alone the WESTMERE). Heck, stuff like 3D Studio Max crashes if you have over 8 cores (or something like that, I forgot the exact number), and most applications still only use one or two cores. There are programs that are exceptions to this, along with people who use said programs to make money, and for them I say go for it (Westmere) if you need the extra cores.

    Q: Aren't there current-generation PC motherboards with USB3 and SATA III that could be used in a HackPro?
    A: That's a two-part question; "is it available?" and "is it supported under Mac OS X?". Current implementations exist, yes; however, they are unofficial non-Intel controller chipsets. The Intel solution is the one most likely to be in the Mac Pro, and Intel is releasing an all-in-one USB 3 / SATA III controller chip in conjunction with Sandy Bridge's release in 2011, for OEMs such as Apple to use on their motherboards. Therefore, there will NOT be Mac OS X drivers for ANY of those unofficial chips that are out today; just in case you were planning to build a Hackintosh with a PC motherboard. One such board is the EVGA SR-2, and if you were to use it, your only chance at getting support for your precious USB3 and SATA3 ports is if you try to port open-source Linux or UNIX drivers to Mac OS X, which is something that the Hackintosh community does at times, but don't bet on being able to boot from a SATA3-connected disk. Basically, NO these things don't exist under Mac OS X until Intel officially brings them out, which they'll be doing with Sandy Bridge's release in 2011. Until then we don't know which of the USB 3 controller chips Apple will be using (most likely the Intel one), and therefore you shouldn't build any Hackintosh today with 3rd party chips hoping for drivers, because they'll most likely never come. So chill out and wait for Apple's Sandy Bridge board, it's too early to know which controller they'll be using (in other words; which chipset they will be writing Mac OS X drivers for).

    Q: Okay so USB3 and SATA III won't work under Mac OS X with current non-Intel implementations. What about Light Peak and PCI Express 3.0, can those be added to current computers in any way?
    A: Light Peak - YES, at lower performance; Intel has designed a PCI Express 2.0 card that will supply Light Peak to existing motherboards (not as fast as native Light Peak though). PCI Express 3.0 - NO, that is dependent on the CPU. For instance, each Nehalem/Westmere Xeon provides thirtytwo (32) "1x" lanes of PCI Express 2.0; with two CPUs that's sixtyfour (64) "1x" lanes, or a total of "64x" of bandwidth. This is then split across the various connectors on the board in any way the manufacturer prefers. Apple, for instance, chose to go for a 4x16 (=64) setup, but could just as well have gone for 2x16 (=32) + 4x8 (=32) = 64 (which would have given six ports, and still only used 64 lanes). Other manufacturers, like EVGA, use Nvidia NF200 line doublers, which is basically an intelligent queuing/messaging passthrough device that allows you to connect multiple fast devices to a single lane, and therefore artificially increases the number of lanes and lets you create configurations such as EVGA SR-2's seven (7) 16x lanes. For PCI Express 3.0, you will need new Sandy Bridge CPUs to take care of the increasing demands such as doubled polling rate and more lanes from the CPU.

    Q: What is all this good for? USB 3? SATA III? Light Peak? PCI Express 3.0? How do I know if I will need it for what I'm doing?
    A: USB 3: Offers a maximum transfer rate of 5 Gbps, which is 10 times faster than USB 2. USB 3 is also full duplex (bi-directional; allowing simultaneous upload and download) whereas USB 2 is only half-duplex (one direction at a time). USB 3 is also superior to SATA 1.0/eSATA, which has a maximum rate of 3 Gbps, and to FireWire 800 (which only offers full duplex at 800 Mbps). It remains to be seen how much CPU it will use (USB has historically been a CPU hog compared to FireWire).
    SATA III: This will offer 6 Gbps transfer rates, which is mainly going to benefit SSD users, since fast SSD RAID arrays will be bottlenecked by the current SATA bus.
    Light Peak: LightPeak is a high-speed optical transfer technology developed by Intel, which will initially offer 10 Gbps over a single wire (and eventually scale up to 100 Gbps), and is something you would have in addition to things like USB3 and SATA III, and only for special purposes; it is meant for connecting super high resolution screens, networking, storage, etc, basically anything that benefits from its huge bandwidth. It offers a massive amount of bandwidth and will be excellent for a lot of purposes such as network-accessed RAID arrays. It all travels over one, tiny cable as well. The long-term goal by Intel is to eventually connect most devices using LightPeak and get rid of dedicated cables such as DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, Audio cables, Mouse cables, Keyboard cables, Network cables, etc, but for the foreseeable future the most likely use will be in high-speed transfers such as networking; with everyone still connecting their regular devices through their dedicated ports (USB, FireWire, DVI, etc...), the way it's done today.
    PCI Express 3.0: As mentioned above, it will have double the current bandwidth of PCI Express 2.0, as well as more lanes. This leads to computers with many more PCI Express slots than today, allowing you to plug in lots of cards. For instance, if you are a music producer using a current Mac Pro and the UAD2 DSP card platform, you would be limited since the current Mac Pro only has four PCI Express slots, and you would need to use at least one for a graphics card, leaving 3 slots free for DSP cards. PCI Express 3.0 will solve all of that, offering many more and faster ports on a single motherboard.

    Q: Well, even though Sandy Bridge is coming out soon, Apple might not use it right away?
    A: My take is: Apple has received early exclusive access from Intel in the past, so it's not impossible that they'll be first out. Even if they do decide to screw us over and delay a Sandy Bridge update next year, it's always easy to build one yourself with off-the-shelf parts (Hackety-hack), which in my opinion is perfectly fine to do when we're dealing with a company that doesn't treat their Pro customers' needs right.

    Yes, it's often the case that the most powerful Macs are Hackintoshes, it's freaking horrible. :( You don't have that problem on the PC side, where you can just get the most powerful components and build anything cheaply. That's why most of the 3D rendering industry is back on Windows or Linux workstations now. I've seen one Windows machine with 288 GB Ram, dual X5680s, 24 SSDs in a RAID configuration. To say that it edited HD movies quickly is an understatement. You can't get anything even close to that in a Mac.

    Let's hope that Westmere upgrade comes soon so that 2009's second-hand value drops further. ;) The 2009's will be nice and cheap and powerful enough while waiting for Sandy Bridge.
     
  2. ronweathers macrumors member

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    #2
    Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 3_1_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/528.18 (KHTML, like Gecko) Mobile/7E18)

    Agree
     
  3. ronweathers macrumors member

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    #3
    Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 3_1_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/528.18 (KHTML, like Gecko) Mobile/7E18)

    Agree
     
  4. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

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    #4
    WWDC did not "came and went". It is still going on through tomorrow.

    And did it ever occur to you that perhaps there might be some stuff about a new Mac Pro that only developers need to know about right now ?

    For example XCode 4.0 has been given to developers attending WWDC. I'm guessing that version has to do with Macs since the iPhone 4 GM has been seeded meaning the "Toys" you refer to can be used using XCode 3.2.
     
  5. c.hilding thread starter macrumors member

    c.hilding

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    #5
    Thanks Ron. Heck, at least we're voting with our feet. Not many people are willing to buy the outdated and overpriced Mac Pros right now, and loads of people are being pushed towards Hackintoshes. It'll be very interesting to see what Apple's next move is. They recently (mid-May) decided to hire 300 new employees at their facilities in Ireland during next year, and the article says that these people are "expected to work on the production of the firm's high-end desktop computer, the Mac Pro, which is targeted at professional users":
    http://www.careersportal.ie/news/ne...lans+to+recruit+300+new+employees&ID=19783158

    I don't know where the article got that idea from (that they'll be working on the Mac Pros), but if that's true, the "hiring 300 people next year" statement doesn't look good.
     
  6. c.hilding thread starter macrumors member

    c.hilding

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    #6
    If they would have released Mac Pros, it would have been during the keynote or on the Tuesday the day after, that's how they usually do it.

    PS: The new release of Xcode is simply that, a new version of Xcode, with the Interface Builder integrated into the workflow, that's it, there's no hidden meaning. ;)
     
  7. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

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    #7
    I don't want to read that but just by the way, Mac Pro suitable Sandy Bridge CPUs won't be available before late 2011
     
  8. Umbongo macrumors 601

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    #8
    Sandy Bridge Xeons are not coming in a few months. Q3 2011 is a rumoured release date. The 32nm socket 1366 line isn't even all out yet, there is more to come at lower price points.
     
  9. PeterQVenkman macrumors 68020

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    #9
    Because Apple loves charging tomorrow's prices for yesterday's workstations. It would make sense, in the screwed up Apple way, for the Pros to be updated right before a new architecture becomes available.
     
  10. c.hilding thread starter macrumors member

    c.hilding

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    #10
    Did you at least read the linked article? It's from April 13, 2010. Intel's CEO announced that production of Sandy Bridge will begin in Q4 2010. This is the first time that Intel has confirmed a production date; all previous dates are old speculation and not based on facts in any way. Also, the announcement doesn't in any way separate the Xeon server processors from that date. Besides, both consumer (Core XXXX) and server (Xeon XXXX) processors are made from the exact same design these days, the only difference being that the Xeons have DUAL QPI links to allow them to communicate with a second processor in a dual CPU setup. Apart from QPI link count; both the consumer and server chips are identical nowadays. Therefore it's trivial for them to manufacture and release both at the same time, and the only constraint would be supply where they might have to choose whether to supply Server or Consumer users first. Either way, Q4 2010 is the first and only official information we have to go by right now.
    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2362601,00.asp

    Update: Confirmed that server versions will come a few months after the consumer versions. Yes, this has historically been what Intel has always done; but I thought that the recent unification of chipset designs, where nowadays both Server and Consumer versions use the same design, could have lead to a simultaneous release for both pro and consumer users. That turned out not to be the case, sigh... Still, that's Sandy Bridge Xeons in April+ 2011 so if you can wait it's very much worth it. Updated first post.

    Haha, what a funny and true observation. Apple loves charging tomorrow's prices for yesterday's processors. Well put.
     
  11. nanofrog macrumors G4

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    #11
    Exactly.

    If Apple waited until Sandy Bridge, it'll be at least 2.5 years between systems, and that's basing it on shipped parts in the beginning of Q3 2011. :eek:
     
  12. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

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    #12
    This rhetoric is getting rediculous. I wish someone would sticky the Mac Pro historical release cycle...

    Thanks to Topper...

    Also, if anyone has tunnel vision, it's a large chunk of the users in this particular forum. Apple is not focusing ALL their efforts on iOS. While it is the focus of this particular WWDC (and for good reasons from a business perspective) Apple just refreshed the MacBook lines, there are rumors of a Mac Mini update next week, and that could very well be accompanied by a Mac Pro update. The last rumors I heard were that an update to the Mac Pro would occur around June, and the month is just underway.

    Also, anyone that thinks the value is going to significantly improve, or pricing will significantly drop with a refresh is delusional. The best value in the current architecture today is a refurb 2009 and after the refresh, that won't change.

    The only thing that will change after the refresh is all this whining about the absence of an update will be replaced with more whining from the same people about how the prices are ridiculous and the value isn't there.
     
  13. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

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    #13
    Low-end chip production will indeed start Q4 this year but high-end with LGA 2011 socket won't be out before H2 2011 and Mac Pro uses high-end chips

    This doesn't seem to be something you are into so please, don't argue about this
     
  14. Peace macrumors Core

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  15. cs4160 macrumors member

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    #15
    What a choice...not sure what i prefer. Outdated HW out the gate, but i get my MP in a month, or wait until Xmas...With my luck, the MP comes out next month, i buy it, and then they break all the rules and do what we have been asking, tech turn quicky: MP 2011 in January....i cant even imagine the posts...

    :)
     
  16. c.hilding thread starter macrumors member

    c.hilding

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    #16
    Found some articles with further information:
    http://www.brightsideofnews.com/news/2010/4/16/intel-shows-off-sandy-bridge-at-idf-2010.aspx
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/cpu/di...ridge_amid_Superior_32nm_Production_Ramp.html

    Dual and Quad-Core low-end models come first, before 6-core and 8-core high-end models in Q2 2011. It still begs the question though: Why get Westmere now? Remember that Westmere is just a "tick" 32nm die-shrink of Nehalem with two more cores in (for a total of 6) in the highest-end CPUs. Why not wait for the "tock" (new architecture) in Q2 2011 and get USB3, LightPeak, SATA3, PCI Express 3.0 (twice the bandwidth), native support for 1600 MHz RAM, 8 cores, and the higher performance of the new architecture?

    Thank you very much for that article, it's obviously damage control due to the huge disappointment at WWDC '11 but at least it shows that Steve is aware.
     
  17. Umbongo macrumors 601

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    #17
    Because the processors and graphics cards currently used have all been replaced and customers expect new products, half of the ones Apple use have received 50% more cores. While we don't know why they aren't out yet for sure, it does seem processor supply may be a key issue rather than Apple holding off. If they don't update to Westmere then they will be selling 2 year old systems at some point.
     
  18. Digital Skunk macrumors 604

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    #18
    I think you have a point, but Apple just doesn't work that way. Not to be negative, but Apple will update the Mac Pros when they feel it's time to release them.

    Honestly, we may be waiting this long because of a . . . I hate to say this but . . . a new case design or something else insane that Apple doesn't need to do with the Mac Pro.

    Very rarely does Apple hold off on a product release because of new useful, up to date, technology. The last time this happened was for the switch from the G4 chip to the G5 chip and a new case design.

    I don't see Apple putting in state of the art tech in a Mac Pro in Q4 and keeping the price at the crazy level it is now, or lowering it to where it should be.
     
  19. longball11 macrumors 6502a

    longball11

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    #19
    Even though he said that. Sound bull ****. MAY emphasize next year's WWDC for mac? hahahaha. It's been iphone that and this the last two or three years in WWDC. Even with the iPad now...
     
  20. c.hilding thread starter macrumors member

    c.hilding

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    #20
    Yeah I thought about that after posting the reply; it'd obviously still be nice if Apple would get some sort of Westmere 6/12-core Mac Pros out, even though they'll be replaced with 8-core Sandy Bridge in April-June (Q2) 2011! At least current models wouldn't be so hopelessly old. The fact that Sandy Bridge isn't that far off is making me rethink everything though. Might just build a cheaper Hackintosh for now using last year's components and use that while waiting for the proper Sandy Bridge models in 2011, which is a sad state of affairs.

    Oh well this thread isn't about me. I certainly do hope Apple releases Westmere models soon!

    Yes, it's often the case that the most powerful Macs are Hackintoshes, it's freaking horrible. :( You don't have that problem on the PC side, where you can just get the most powerful components and build anything cheaply. That's why most of the 3D rendering industry is back on Windows or Linux workstations now. I've seen one Windows machine with 288 GB Ram, dual X5680s, 24 SSDs in a RAID configuration. To say that it edited HD movies quickly is an understatement. You can't get anything even close to that in a Mac.

    I know, depressing...
     
  21. Umbongo macrumors 601

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    #21
    Don't forget we are only talking about all this because Apple haven't released new systems almost 3 months after the processors were launched. Sandy Bridge's release date doesn't much matter.
     
  22. VirtualRain macrumors 603

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    #22
    The reason for this years focus on iOS should be obvious.

    Apple has three lines of business that are all approx. $10B business units:
    - Mac
    - iPod
    - iPhone

    Their Mac market is growing at a tremendous rate, almost all by itself (see my post on why iDevices are good for the Mac).

    The iPod market is somewhat stagnant, and to some extent being cannibalized by Apple's own more sophisticated iOS devices. It's a market in decline.

    The iPhone market is under assault by Google and it's critical that Apple focus on competing strongly here.

    Finally, Apple is trying to develop a new line of business around tablets that they hope will be a fourth $10B business, and it too is already in the sights of many competitors. If they want to achieve $10B like revenues in this area, it's going to require a massive effort.

    To have done anything other than focus this years WWDC on catering to iOS developers would have been a bad decision for their two business units which are most vulnerable.

    You guys need to think with your Apple business hat on. Presumably, all of the new customers Apple is bringing on board, is great news for the pros who frequent this forum... it means more customers to consume whatever you are developing.
     
  23. c.hilding thread starter macrumors member

    c.hilding

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    #23
    The reason Sandy Brudge was brought up was that Intel's CEO has finally given a release date for Sandy Bridge (before this it was all speculation); and that the date given was not far off (Q4 2010). However, as was pointed out in the thread, it then turned out that the high-end 6- and 8-core models will come 3 months after the Sandy Bridge release, which puts it a bit further into the future (April+ 2011), basically removing it from the radar as far as what will be in the next Mac Pro goes, but the date is close enough that it's still worth carefully thinking about your next purchase.

    Basically, to get the most out of your buck, you have these choices:

    If you have a perfectly good workstation now and can use it until April+ 2011, then wait. You'll be getting Sandy Bridge's USB3, LightPeak, SATA3, PCI Express 3.0 (twice the bandwidth), native support for 1600 MHz RAM, 8 cores per processor, and higher performance, and it'll be a much better buy than ANY Westmere of today (which is merely a die-shrink of November 2008's Nehalem).

    If you don't have a workstation now but need one, then either get a Westmere Mac Pro workstation when they come out if you don't mind the entire architecture becoming obsolete in 9-10 months (as opposed to just a die-shrink such as Nehalem -> Westmere), or get something cheaper for now such as last year's technology; either via a refurb, second-hand or a cheap Hackintosh. I'll most likely hit this camp. They are still powerful machines and will be excellent to tide you over into 2011, where you'll be able to get the vastly superior Sandy Bridge (SB) <-- (click) architecture.

    If you don't have a need for a workstation now, but want one later, then wait for Sandy Bridge and use something like an iMac, MacBook or Mac Mini for now.
     
  24. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

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    #24
    Q2 is just a rumor, many other articles have stated H2 2011, e.g. this. They also stated in the article you linked that Q2 2011 or later so it's just a pure guess and I wouldn't bet my money on Q2. Production may start then thus if Apple gets them earlier, we may see SB Mac Pro in summer 2011, but that's just IF.

    There has also been some rumors about Becton going 32nm in early 2011 so that would fulfill some Xeon market before SB hits the high-end market.

    Too early to give other than guesses. There is no official info about Sandy Bridge Xeons
     
  25. ValSalva macrumors 68040

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    #25
    Is SJ responding to the Newsweek column or the sender of the email?

    The sender said: "I believe and hope that the Mac will remain a vibrant, vital part of Apple's future and one of its (admittedly many) product lines" He then asks SJ: "So, as you view it, does the Mac have a long and important history ahead of it?" And SJ responds: "Completely wrong. Just wait."

    Who's wrong is SJ's estimation, the emailer or those that speculate about the Macopalypse? Maybe SJ is too cryptic :D
     

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