Youth unemployment 'disaster'

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jnpy!$4g3cwk, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #1
    Interesting article on BBC site regarding youth unemployment discussions at the Davos 2012 conference:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-16774301

    "The numbers are stark: In some countries of the Arab world, up to 90% of 16-24 year olds are unemployed. In the United States the youth unemployment rate is 23%. In Spain nearly 50%. In the UK 22%."

    Lots of discussion and angles. A lot of people are getting concerned. Finally.
     
  2. malman89 macrumors 68000

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    #2
    It is an interesting dilemma that not many people are noticing - or caring about. A solid post by Philalawyer, a favorite of mine, sums it up nicely - at least for the situation in the US.

    The over-education mentioned for South Korea is really everywhere, it seems. When I was studying abroad I visited Poland and befriended some law students. They were saying it wasn't rare for a store owner to have a Masters. The ones I'm still in touch with had to leave Poland to find jobs in their fields.

    The same thing is going on in the U.S. Everyone is told to go to college - even if they're not really the college type - and if they do go, many major things that aren't easily transferrable into the professional world. That's why we're lacking IT/high-tech jobs and also have an ever growing need for skilled labor (welders and such) that earn more than your average English major, but have the negative stigma of doing real work.

    I'm a rarity among my friends and in my workplace. 22, graduated last May, found work right out of college. Only took 100+ applications, bunch of phone interviews, handful of in-person interviews. Not really doing the greatest work (but work at a great place), but not going to complain because I'd probably be living at home instead of being able to stay in Chicago.
     
  3. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #3
    Meanwhile seniors everywhere are wondering why these damn kids cant just "get a job" as they work in positions meant for high school kids.
     
  4. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    Except Tertiary study is affordable and accessible in every developed country but America. A student loan isn't a life sentence.

    In New Zealand you don't have to pay off your Government grant/loan until you earn over a certain threshold.
     
  5. 0dev macrumors 68040

    0dev

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    Boris Johnson (mayor of London) recently basically said that a lot of jobs typically taken by immigrants are the ones teenagers used to take, and that's the problem. And, not to sound racist or anything, but it's true. Walk into any fast food place in London and you'll rarely find English people working there.

    That said, my friend who lives in Yorkshire has a job in McDonald's, and some of her friends work there too, so maybe the problem isn't as widespread in the UK as the media would have us believe.

    I also have one friend in particular who, like me, starts his own businesses, and it seems that being an entrepreneur is becoming more fashionable these days. I wonder if that's taken into account?
     
  6. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #6
    Ahh, the good ole days when fast food jobs were a dime a dozen and kids blew off their jobs to make that important party, cause they could always find another...
     
  7. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #7
    That is quite often the result of the wife not wanting the husband under her feet all day. ;)
     
  8. Surely Guest

    Surely

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    #8
    For the last time iJH, yes, I'll have fries with that.



    All we need to do is elect Newt, and he'll put the kids to work.
     
  9. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    Would you like to Super-Size your order, Sir?
     
  10. Surely Guest

    Surely

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    #10
    And here I thought I was at Harvey's. Do they super-size now?
     
  11. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

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    #11
    or that they have bills to pay and need the income
     
  12. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    Probably true for the U.S., but up here we have the Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security, plus Disability Benefits if necessary.

    Most also have Pension income from their employer as well. And perhaps RRSP/RRIF income from self-directed savings along the way.
     
  13. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #13
    Also if you never worked a day in your life in Canada you will get ~1000 a month as a senior. Not sure I entirely agree with it, but thats what I have seen.
     
  14. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #14
    Some people 'work' to raise a family. They don't always have a spouse around to help-out in their old age. :(
     
  15. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

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    #15
    is that why it's called Kommunist Kanada?

    you would have been outraged at the idea back when you lived in kansas :p
     
  16. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    You're right. Canad's made him soft and a socialist. :D
     
  17. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    It has that effect on people.

    I don't think CPP is a sustainable system given the onslaught of the boomers, particularly when the peak hits in about 10-15 years. We have already been warned by the current government that changes are a coming. Personally, I have planned for there being no money left when its time for me to draw in 20 years or so. Still not a bad turnaround from over 40% senior poverty in the early 70s to under 5% in 2007.

    Living in area of high retirement, we have an overall unemployment rate of about 4-5% and a youth rate of about 10%. Most of the employed youth find work in fields that seniors are not capable or willing to take. Late hours, physical labour, manual dexterity, etc. but the baby boomer retirement bulge is definitely making an impact.
     
  18. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #18
    Most parents work at some time or another in their life before or after raising kids. The people that I mainly don't agree with getting pensions are the grandparents and older parents that come over just to retire here. They have stopped immigration for parents/grandparents for the time being and have instead provided a super visa which require the grandparents to get private insurance while over here.
     
  19. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    What has compounded the problem of youth unemployment, is that governments around the world are raising the pension age from 65 to 67 yrs. (Plus actively discouraging early retirement.)

    With a shrinking economy jobs are hard to find.
     
  20. iStudentUK, Jan 30, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2012

    iStudentUK macrumors 65816

    iStudentUK

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    #20
    This is a key issue, balancing the fact that people live longer after retirement now against the need to 'free up' jobs for young people starting out.

    It can be really unfair to make people work that long- the life expectancy of someone who works until 65 can be much less than if they do so at 60 (especially in some professions like doctors, teachers etc). Stress is a real killer, imagine retiring knowing thanks to your job you can enjoy far fewer years of retirement.
     
  21. Fazzy macrumors 6502

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    Your right, its pretty unfair to expect someone over 65 (in some professions) to produce the same quality of work as a person half their age. For example, postmen walk miles every day within their shift. How can we expect our senior citizens to compete? Although in other professions, experience comes with the years. Take a judge, for example.:)
     
  22. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    I don't think any studies have found this to be true.

    Aside from obvious high risk professions, which are rare these days in the developed world, working past 65 tends to keep people healthier. Of course there is a chicken and egg problem (they might just be healthier individuals), but the staggering number judges, lawyers, doctors, researchers, professors, writers, actors, etc who work past 70 is at least counter to the notion that stress shortens life.

    The opposite can also happen. A bench full of 70+ judges is probably going to be less prepared to grapple with the impact of new technology. There's a balance to everything, even experience.
     
  23. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    There was that Boeing study but I think that was severely flawed so its conclusion, that the earlier the retirement the longer the life, is in doubt.
    Drop in the bucket. Where are the assembly line workers, housekeepers, gardeners, manual labourers, etc.? At any rate, I'm not sure that even in the professional service sector that a large number of people work past 70.


    Yes. Something to be said for new blood and fresh thinking.
     
  24. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    In a bygone era.
    Obviously this will depend on the profession, but in some contexts it is the norm to work well beyond 70. Judges, for example, tend to continue serving well beyond 70 unless they are mandated by local laws to retire at 70. The same is true for academics.

    Obviously there are vast sectors of the workforce who can't do this, but we also haven't spent much time as a society pondering how to value the contributions of the elderly.
     
  25. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #25
    There was some interest in the past 3-4 years in the idea that early retirement might be associated with increased incidence of Alzheimer's disease and/or mild cognitive impairment, but I think those studies taken as a whole ended up being equivocal as well.

    Retirement age is a complicated thing, though. Saying that judges and university professors (who are a highly self-selected crowd) routinely stay active in their 70s does not mean that the effects will be the same if clerks or factory workers are on the job at 70 or 75. Also simply put, if you take a group of people who are allowed to keep working past 65 or whatever age, and you compare them to another group that is *forced* to continue working or stop working, this is not a reasonable comparison for inferring the impact of age at retirement.

    As a psychologist, I tell people to stay as active and engaged as possible in later life, and to spend as much time as they can learning new things and doing things they love. On the other hand, I am also biased in that I think, generally, living 75 or 85 quality years is preferable to living 90 years with poor health.
     

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