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bill-p
Sep 11, 2011, 01:16 PM
Now that I have had a good feel for Lion and its features, something has been bothering me to death.

People are calling Lion the merging of OSX and iOS, but... I don't think so at all. Aside from Launchpad, there is nothing else iOS-like about Lion. It's still OSX, just with more features and improvements. But again, that's except for Launchpad.

Since I can quickly access the Applications folder from the Dock, which practically pops up everywhere now (in Mission Control, from the side of the screen it's situated at, and so on), and not to mention I can stick any application to the Dock itself for even faster access, I have to wonder... "What's Launchpad for?"

Launchpad doesn't seem particularly useful for anything for me, but that might just be me.

So do you use Launchpad at all?



mountains
Sep 11, 2011, 01:19 PM
Launchpad is directed towards new Mac users, casual users, and people switching over from iOS to OS X. If you're posting on this site, Launchpad probably isn't intended for you.

(marc)
Sep 11, 2011, 01:22 PM
Launchpad is directed towards new Mac users, casual users, and people switching over from iOS to OS X. If you're posting on this site, Launchpad probably isn't intended for you.

No, Launchpad simply sucks.

dlimes13
Sep 11, 2011, 01:24 PM
Hate it. Doesn't detect all apps, puts useless stuff like uninstallers and such in it, can't customize it, etc. Which there was a way to disable it.

weinschela
Sep 11, 2011, 01:26 PM
Launchpad is a beta test by Apple. We'll what it looks like after a few more iterations. Right now, I see no point trying to find apps in Launcpad.

tahoeroscoe
Sep 11, 2011, 01:30 PM
i like it, easier to navigate than my apps folder and i can get to it from any screen, even when my dock isn't visible

appleguy123
Sep 11, 2011, 01:31 PM
Sometimes, for an application I rarely use.

danpass
Sep 11, 2011, 01:31 PM
yes.


I like a minimal dock

WeegieMac
Sep 11, 2011, 01:34 PM
I'd like to use it, but the animation frame rate when launching drops so much after the machine has been on a while that it's unusable.

QuarterSwede
Sep 11, 2011, 01:36 PM
yes.


I like a minimal dock
Same here. My dock is now reserved for running applications and folder shortcuts. Once you clean up and organize LaunchPad it's quite useful.

iVikD
Sep 11, 2011, 01:58 PM
I use it to access my games and some other apps from time to time, since I don't like keeping an Applications folder on my dock. I tend to use spotlight (command + space) to open quick-use apps like TextEdit and the likes, however.

mrsir2009
Sep 11, 2011, 02:04 PM
From time to time... It is handy to have all your applications right there, especially the ones you don't use everyday.

mountains
Sep 11, 2011, 02:37 PM
I like a minimal dock too, but it's so much faster to just use Quicksilver or Spotlight to launch apps that Launchpad feels useless to me.

Why people want to disable it, though, I can't fathom. I use OS X pretty much every day, and I haven't even seen my Launchpad in the last week. There's no reason to look at it unless you want to use it.

fingleburt
Sep 11, 2011, 06:27 PM
I use Launchpad all the time but I'm coming over from Windows and IPhone, I honestly dont see what all the fuss is about using it. Works for me.

quickmac
Sep 11, 2011, 06:33 PM
Launchpad seems to be useful if one had a touchscreen interface. Like an iMac with a touchscreen.

Since no Macbook, Macbook Pro, iMac, Mac Pro, or external displays have touch screens Launchpad is currently a waste.

I could see it working well with touch screen based computers. Apple needs to do one like that because HP already has them (even if they are ditching the PC business) and Windows 8 is heavily based on touch screen interface designs.

RolandNights
Sep 11, 2011, 06:37 PM
I just like doing the multi-touch gesture to bring it up. :p

But seriously, I use Alfred or Spotlight to open up all of my applications anyway, so I almost never actually use Launchpad.

Sometimes someone is on my computer, though, that isn't familiar with OS X, so I'll just tell them to hit the button I assigned to Launchpad and select the program from there. For that purpose, I did clean up Launchpad using Launchpad Cleaner, but that thing is so erratic. It will randomly reset and re-add all the icons I removed from it.

----------

I'll also add that it'll seem more like iOS once iOS 5 comes out. IIRC, switching between apps in iOS 5 will be like switching between fullscreen apps in Lion. Likewise, opening up Launchpad will be the same gesture as going back to the homescreen in iOS. THAT will make Launchpad seem very iOS-ish.

Jagardn
Sep 11, 2011, 08:14 PM
Sometimes, for an application I rarely use.

Same here.

maflynn
Sep 11, 2011, 08:52 PM
Its easier to just go to the Application folder, especially if you have that saved in your dock

Dale Sorel
Sep 11, 2011, 08:59 PM
I've been thinking of using it lately, especially since there are cool freeware apps like Launchpad-Control to help you organize things.

aziatiklover
Sep 11, 2011, 09:04 PM
I do and love it, but sometimes forget it's there so I go to finder then application SMH! haha

alexbates
Sep 11, 2011, 09:15 PM
I don't see why people dislike it. It's a great replacement for having your Applications folder in your dock, and because of its easy access, lets me have less applications in the dock. My main problem with it is the lag- scrolling between pages and opening/closing folders does not feel nearly as smooth as even my 1st gen iPod Touch (which has terrible graphics in comparison to my Mac). That hopefully will be fixed in time. And I just don't see the point in blurring the desktop wallpaper when all of the icons have shadows like iOS.

Have it set to open with a three finger slide up on Magic Mouse using BetterTouchTool

Edit- Fail. iPod Touch 1G cannot open/close folders, only scroll between pages.

DandsM
Sep 11, 2011, 09:25 PM
SPOTLIGHT always, for anything.

appleguy123
Sep 11, 2011, 09:49 PM
I don't see why people dislike it. It's a great replacement for having your Applications folder in your dock, and because of its easy access, lets me have less applications in the dock. My main problem with it is the lag- scrolling between pages and opening/closing folders does not feel nearly as smooth as even my 1st gen iPod Touch (which has terrible graphics in comparison to my Mac). That hopefully will be fixed in time. And I just don't see the point in blurring the desktop wallpaper when all of the icons have shadows like iOS.

Have it set to open with a three finger slide up on Magic Mouse using BetterTouchTool

How do you have folders on your first gen touch?

neko girl
Sep 11, 2011, 09:59 PM
I lose Launchpad. It's wonderful.

I like virtual folder idea that lets me organize apps how I like. What doesn't make sense to me though is how the dock in Mac OS is different from dock in iOS:

App in Launchpad doesn't disappear from dock, and vice versa
Dock is also the multi-tasking tray - it's separate on iOS


The Mac OS paradigm of the dock is much better, because I'm used to it more, but the two OSes are inconsistent in how the dock interacts (or is related to) Launchpad.

appleguy123
Sep 11, 2011, 10:03 PM
I lose Launchpad. It's wonderful.

I like virtual folder idea that lets me organize apps how I like. What doesn't make sense to me though is how the dock in Mac OS is different from dock in iOS:

App in Launchpad doesn't disappear from dock, and vice versa
Dock is also the multi-tasking tray - it's separate on iOS


The Mac OS paradigm of the dock is much better, because I'm used to it more, but the two OSes are inconsistent in how the dock interacts (or is related to) Launchpad.
If the iPhone had the real estate of a Mac, I'm sure that the docks would be consistent. I am okay with them being pretty inconsistent now.

scarred
Sep 11, 2011, 10:23 PM
I use LaunchPad instead of Mission Control. Work in full screen mode a lot (macbook air 13)... when I want to switch to something else, gesture out and pick it from the launchpad or dock.

LIVEFRMNYC
Sep 11, 2011, 10:57 PM
I use Launchpad a lot more now. I'm not using it a lot more on purpose, it's just becoming a habit(especially since I have it set on the upper left hot corner), but it's not something I have found to rely on yet.

Launchpad just needs more control/options, then I'll probably rely on it more.

vitzr
Sep 11, 2011, 11:04 PM
It does what it was designed for, it impresses litte kids like my five year old. She thinks it's cute, makes her giggle & most certainly influences her to turn over her money to Apple when she gets older.

Me?

Oh please it's a "Golly Gee Whiz" time waster.

appleguy123
Sep 11, 2011, 11:11 PM
It does what it was designed for, it impresses litte kids like my five year old. She thinks it's cute, makes her giggle & most certainly influences her to turn over her money to Apple when she gets older.

Me?

Oh please it's a "Golly Gee Whiz" time waster.

How does it waste your time if you never use it?

simplebeep
Sep 12, 2011, 12:36 AM
I am disappointed not by the launchpad, its functionality, or its intended users. I simply find it funny that such a weak feature should deserve the triumphant name "Launchpad."

Instead, I like to disempower the funny little screen by calling it by its developer name: the Springboard (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SpringBoard#Use_in_Mac_OS_10.7_.28Lion.29).

Say it for yourself, and try not to giggle. "Springboard." "Springboard!" :o Indeed, this lighter title much more aptly fits the nature of the limp launcher.

GoKyu
Sep 12, 2011, 02:44 AM
I have no use for Launchpad at all, and as someone else mentioned, I'd love to be able to disable it - particularly because when you download an app from the Mac App Store, it automatically takes you into Launchpad...I guess to be more iOS-like.

Bad feature for those of us who are familiar with using the Dock.

roadbloc
Sep 12, 2011, 05:06 AM
Launchpad is useless. A step backwards from having the applications folder on your dock.

darels
Sep 12, 2011, 05:08 AM
I deleted my applications folder from my dock and instead of that i use lunch pad, anyway, mac os x was known as simply comfortable os, now it isn't simply, a lot of features with a lot of animations it makes a little bit ... strange, full screen apps the only thing which keeps me on os x lion.

CmdrLaForge
Sep 12, 2011, 05:27 AM
I kind of start using it if the app name doesn't come into my mind. If I know the name I use Spotlight which I invoke using Apple+Space

KnightWRX
Sep 12, 2011, 07:19 AM
I completely forgot about Launchpad the day I pulled it from my dock. Which coincidentally, was the same day I installed Lion.

I use LaunchPad instead of Mission Control.

I don't see how one is related to the other.

840quadra
Sep 12, 2011, 07:25 AM
I don't see how one is related to the other.

It is and it isn't.

If you think in iOS terms, a way of going back and forth between applications running in the background. The Launchpad can be your starting point without ever touching the dock, or Mission Control.

It's just a different way of using your system.

Though I am one to add to the count of people who don't use Launchpad for anything.

Razeus
Sep 12, 2011, 07:36 AM
I use it exclusively. So much easier to get to my apps. I took the applications folder out of my dock. I hated the way it would have to scroll because I have more apps that show on initial view. Now with Launchpad, I don't worry about such things. I can now open an app with 2 clicks, instead of click, scrolling, click (with Applications folder), or multiple keys to activate the app through Spotlight.

I just bought my girlfriend a Macbook Air 13 inch. I was showing her how to use it, being she came from Windows. I told her how to launch apps, and this will be the only way she'll know how. Sneaky, I know, but easy enough to explain it to her. I say "click this icon in your dock, and it works just like your iPhone/iPad." She got it right away.

Oldandintheway
Sep 12, 2011, 08:16 AM
I wish it acted like a desktop wallpaper instead of an application. Why should i have to launch an application to launch my applications?

ljonesj
Sep 12, 2011, 11:22 AM
To me using the application folder in my dock is way easier to use than launchpad i used it for like a day when i got lion then took off my dock. Wish i could uninstall mission control and launchpad to me they are a waste of space but to each their own. One person way of using the mac is different than another.

mrsir2009
Sep 12, 2011, 01:22 PM
I deleted my applications folder from my dock and instead of that i use lunch pad, anyway, mac os x was known as simply comfortable os, now it isn't simply, a lot of features with a lot of animations it makes a little bit ... strange, full screen apps the only thing which keeps me on os x lion.

Same here. IMO the lauchpad is a improved, fullscreen, prettier version of the App stack.

NorthDakota91
Sep 13, 2011, 01:31 PM
And I just don't see the point in blurring the desktop wallpaper when all of the icons have shadows like iOS.

If you don't like blur, just fire up launchpad and press CMD+B ;) that should make launchpad a little snappier.

Anyway, I like launchpad. Works well for me, in conjunction with Launchpad Control (so I got rid of the Photoshop Uninstaller). I can't understand why people complain about it - if you don't like it, don't use it :) if the icon on the dock bothers you - remove that, too :)

Steve's Barber
Sep 13, 2011, 01:55 PM
I deleted the LaunchPad file in disgust. It just bothered me that Apple could piss way time coding this asinine thing instead of working on other aspects of Lion that need attention.

strubinstein
Sep 13, 2011, 03:08 PM
I think launchpad is significantly more useful if you have a multi touch pad. In which case the gesture to open it makes it feel more seamless. I use it on my MBP to get to any applications that aren't on my dock. Which is to say on somewhat rare occasions.

I can't believe some people would get their panties in a bunch over it to the extent that they would bother deleting the file. Honestly, if you don't like it don't use it. If it actually pisses you off AT ALL, you need to seriously consider you're priorities and figure out what really matters in life. Its an optional feature in a computer OS, honestly...People care WAY too much.

BurningJah
Sep 13, 2011, 03:14 PM
I said to my parent to upgrade to Lion! because the barely touched the basics of what it can do for them!
they don't know where to find their programs! so I told them.
it's a perfect OS for beginners especially the launchpadthingy

dusk007
Sep 13, 2011, 03:37 PM
To me people who overcrowd the dock with 30+ apps are computer illiterates but now with Launchpad those people get promoted because there has to be a new slot below.

quietstormSD
Sep 13, 2011, 09:20 PM
Never use launchpad. With the Apps folder on my dock, I can't see the use for it. I don't mind not having a minimal dock

InuNacho
Sep 13, 2011, 10:13 PM
Nope.
http://i645.photobucket.com/albums/uu171/Lord_Deo/Screenshot2011-09-13at81202PM.png

stevensr123
Sep 14, 2011, 05:28 AM
All the time, I personally think it's a great and simple way to organise My files, and since i have The 2011 macbook air, at a touch of a button I can have all my apps in front of me in an instant.

Before launch pad i just to have go into finder to arm find all my apps :D

I don't know why people even dislike it, why is it so bad? It's too simple to hate :rolleyes: it does what it says "on the box" i.e. launches apps/organises apps.

The only thing i actually dislike about it, is when i accidentally click on the background space of lauchpad, which makes it "quit" and go back to my normal desktop.

3bs
Sep 14, 2011, 07:03 AM
I use it from time to time but it needs a bit of work

KnightWRX
Sep 14, 2011, 08:07 AM
I don't know why people even dislike it, why is it so bad? It's too simple to hate :rolleyes: it does what it says "on the box" i.e. launches apps/organises apps.


I'd rather have a simple run box to type the name of the app I want to run (spotlight fills that role nicely, though I'd really prefer a "run command" box). The apps I access often are on the dock at the bottom. I don't need a grid of icons, never liked it in the past (never used the /Applications folder directly in Finder, never had a bunch of App shortcuts on the desktop), don't see how Launchpad fixes that.

It's a preference. Different strokes for different folks.

paulsalter
Sep 14, 2011, 08:19 AM
If I didnt have many apps then I might use it more, but I find it takes too long to find things on LaunchPad, and organising things is a pain with multiple pages (much the same as iOS before they allowed reorganising via iTunes)

Much prefer running apps from the dock/spotlight and for occasional ones I dont know the name of, a simple list of apps name (application folder in dock) does me nicely

Benbikeman
Sep 14, 2011, 01:06 PM
I love Launchpad. I have them organised in the layout I want, not the order they happen to end up in in the Applications folder, and I now have my dock set to running apps only.

wikus
Sep 14, 2011, 01:25 PM
I have no use for Launchpad at all, and as someone else mentioned, I'd love to be able to disable it - particularly because when you download an app from the Mac App Store, it automatically takes you into Launchpad...I guess to be more iOS-like.

Bad feature for those of us who are familiar with using the Dock.

Its a bad feature for anyone who isnt an idiot and knows how to use a computer.

Lion is such a fail. I'm sticking to Snow Leopard.

marcusj0015
Sep 14, 2011, 01:57 PM
I've used Hackintosh of Leopard and Snow Leopard, and the main complaint i had coming from window was having to use finder to naviagate the file system to launch apps, being an iOS user, and a soon to be former windows user, Launchpad is fantastic.

click the icon, you have all your apps right there.

i REALLY like it.

yongren
Sep 14, 2011, 02:22 PM
I thought it was pointless at first, but I find myself using it more and more since I finally got around to organizing all my apps and assigned a more intuitive gesture using BetterTouchTool.

It's faster than Spotlight for finding an app quick, if you're organized. Also, like some others have said, it allows you to keep your dock clean and minimal.

However, I do have some complaints:

The whole thing where you click-hold an app to make all the icons wiggle seems pointless, since you can drag and drop apps without ever entering "wiggly mode." They should remove one feature or the other, no need to be redundant. Personally I think it would be more consistent with the iOS feel if they disabled free drag-and-dropping outside of wiggly mode.

Also, I wish there were an option to remove an app from Launchpad without uninstalling it.

MacRum2011
Sep 14, 2011, 02:24 PM
I don't use launchpad, i have what i use most on the dock where its easier to get to, and i go to the app folder also on the dock to open anything else i use if i need it. Launchpad to me feel not needed.

DReynolds86
Sep 14, 2011, 03:06 PM
I use it. I like a clean Dock. I think the only program I've added to the Dock for quick launch is Skype. Launchpad just reminds me of the Start button on a Windows OS, with "Quick Launch" programs. It just looks more "iOS-like" if that makes any sense. I have a games folder with Angry Birds, Angry Birds Rio, Civilization V and Hoyle Casino in it. Keeps my Dock cleaner.

NorthDakota91
Sep 14, 2011, 03:24 PM
However, I do have some complaints:

The whole thing where you click-hold an app to make all the icons wiggle seems pointless, since you can drag and drop apps without ever entering "wiggly mode." They should remove one feature or the other, no need to be redundant. Personally I think it would be more consistent with the iOS feel if they disabled free drag-and-dropping outside of wiggly mode.

The wiggly mode is used to uninstall Mac AppStore apps. IMHO activating wiggly mode to move apps would be a pain. Also (always IMHO) making OS X totally consistent with iOS is just wrong - Macs don't have a touchscreen!

awpitchy
Sep 14, 2011, 03:40 PM
Just use spotlight, everything is there, no faffing! :P

Jazwire
Sep 14, 2011, 03:45 PM
Hate it. Doesn't detect all apps, puts useless stuff like uninstallers and such in it, can't customize it, etc. Which there was a way to disable it.

Bingo. I'd use it if it wasn't for this.

scarred
Sep 14, 2011, 05:58 PM
Its a bad feature for anyone who isnt an idiot and knows how to use a computer.

Lion is such a fail. I'm sticking to Snow Leopard.

I can't believe the hate over such a simple little feature. I'm actually shocked.

I wonder if people had nervous break downs like this when automatic transmissions came out for automobiles.

Just because a feature is added, doesn't mean you have to concern yourself about it and hate and degrade people who use it. Get a grip people.

Dale Sorel
Sep 14, 2011, 06:04 PM
I can't believe the hate over such a simple little feature. I'm actually shocked.

I wonder if people had nervous break downs like this when automatic transmissions came out for automobiles.

LOL :p

mrsir2009
Sep 14, 2011, 11:23 PM
I deleted the LaunchPad file in disgust.

Overkill much?

iansilv
Sep 15, 2011, 12:41 AM
I can't configure it the way I want, so I don't use it. The end. Very un-Apple like...

Benbikeman
Sep 16, 2011, 04:31 AM
Why can't you configure it? I have all my apps in the layout I want them. Admittedly I can't omit apps from Launchpad, but I have a folder called Autolaunched for apps I never need to launch manually, and one called Rarely Used to tuck away apps I need only very occasionally. This done, I can launch my main apps faster than I could from the Apps folder on the dock.

mrsir2009
Sep 16, 2011, 04:38 AM
Why can't you configure it? I have all my apps in the layout I want them. Admittedly I can't omit apps from Launchpad, but I have a folder called Autolaunched for apps I never need to launch manually, and one called Rarely Used to tuck away apps I need only very occasionally. This done, I can launch my main apps faster than I could from the Apps folder on the dock.

Yeah you can remove apps from the launchpad with mods/hacks. Google it. :)

Bernard SG
Sep 16, 2011, 04:59 AM
I rarely use it but I can see when it can be of great help: There are many apps that I use once in a while and I forget their name or confuse them with another app; for example, media converters: I use different ones depending on the type of conversion I need to do and sometimes I struggle remembering the name of the one I need at a specific time. Launchpad showing all (or almost all) apps is then useful and more user friendly than browsing the Application folder.
Another way I use it is when I'm bored :D : I launch Launchpad and try to find an app that I could use to kill some time.
But my main tools for launching apps are the Dock and Spotlight.

maril1111
Sep 16, 2011, 05:01 AM
Sometimes although I wonder how can you disable it?

mrsir2009
Sep 16, 2011, 05:08 AM
Sometimes although I wonder how can you disable it?

Rip it from the dock?

Macman45
Sep 16, 2011, 05:27 AM
I don't like a cluttered dock either:)

maril1111
Sep 16, 2011, 06:40 AM
Rip it from the dock?

Yeh but for some reason it is active in my left top screen corner... how do i get it rid from there??

paulsalter
Sep 16, 2011, 09:37 AM
Yeh but for some reason it is active in my left top screen corner... how do i get it rid from there??

Mission Control preferences, at the bottom is a button for Hot Corners, go in there and change the top left corner to something else

Steve's Barber
Sep 16, 2011, 09:59 AM
I've used Hackintosh of Leopard and Snow Leopard, and the main complaint i had coming from window was having to use finder to naviagate the file system to launch apps, being an iOS user, and a soon to be former windows user, Launchpad is fantastic.

click the icon, you have all your apps right there.

i REALLY like it.

Put your App folder on the dock. Same thing.

maril1111
Sep 16, 2011, 10:01 AM
Mission Control preferences, at the bottom is a button for Hot Corners, go in there and change the top left corner to something else

Thanx :)

Benbikeman
Sep 16, 2011, 11:20 AM
Put your App folder on the dock. Same thing.
Not the same thing at all: the app folder is in alphabetic order, Launchpad can be in any order you choose. I have my Launchpad page organised by both frequency of launch and category of app, so my finger already knows where to go to launch any of my main apps.

Razeus
Sep 16, 2011, 11:50 AM
If you're still using the Applications folder on your dock, you're doing it wrong.:rolleyes:

Paulywauly
Sep 16, 2011, 12:04 PM
I tried using Launchpad, first organizing apps into folders/rows etc wondering if i would "get it" and discover a new way of working. I even removed all of my Dock icons! Eventually after a day i gave up with it, it didn't add anything useful for me at all and made opening apps up a much slower process.

I went back to having a small/wide dock filled with apps i regularly used(separated into types by empty dock spacers) The stuff used rarely is accessed through Spotlight.

Not gonna say its rubbish, i'm sure some will find it useful but i wasn't one of them

wikus
Sep 16, 2011, 02:02 PM
I can't believe the hate over such a simple little feature. I'm actually shocked.

I wonder if people had nervous break downs like this when automatic transmissions came out for automobiles.

Just because a feature is added, doesn't mean you have to concern yourself about it and hate and degrade people who use it. Get a grip people.

No, a feature was *removed*

Unlike some, I multitask a lot. I sometimes have 10-20 windows open between only 2-4 applications (photoshop, illustrator, indesign, etc).

They managed to screw this up completely by grouping all of the open windows within an application when trying to view everything at once.

This alone KILLS my productivity. Don't assume that nothing was made worse, Apple isn't godlike.

fisherking
Sep 16, 2011, 02:09 PM
i found it easy to adapt to (once i organized things).
i NEVER use the dock (i have it locked away, and for YEARS now LOL).

my only wish: app folders should automatically CLOSE in Launchpad, after you select an app from a folder.

but i find it (on my macbook, anyway) a simple and fast way to open my most-used and often-used apps...

mrsir2009
Sep 16, 2011, 02:51 PM
i found it easy to adapt to (once i organized things).
i NEVER use the dock (i have it locked away, and for YEARS now LOL).

my only wish: app folders should automatically CLOSE in Launchpad, after you select an app from a folder.

but i find it (on my macbook, anyway) a simple and fast way to open my most-used and often-used apps...

+1 I find when I go onto the launchpad most of the time there's a folder open...

Wicked1
Sep 16, 2011, 03:13 PM
Nope I also do not buy applications from Apple's Store online.

Dale Sorel
Sep 16, 2011, 03:24 PM
No, a feature was *removed*

Unlike some, I multitask a lot. I sometimes have 10-20 windows open between only 2-4 applications (photoshop, illustrator, indesign, etc).

They managed to screw this up completely by grouping all of the open windows within an application when trying to view everything at once.

I don't know what you mean by "grouping all of the open windows within an application" when it's up to you how you group windows between desktops within Mission Control.

DJRobertobeats
Sep 16, 2011, 05:26 PM
I hide my dock and don't like a lot of clutter on it, so yup use it all the time.

wikus
Sep 16, 2011, 07:52 PM
I don't know what you mean by "grouping all of the open windows within an application" when it's up to you how you group windows between desktops within Mission Control.

Ok, a scenario then:

If I have 6 documents open in photoshop, 3 in illustrator and 2 in indesign, I *should* have a total of 11 windows spread apart when activating mission control. Instead, I have only THREE and I have no way of previewing/selecting windows behind the one in front thats displayed as theyre all cascading.

The only time it displays all windows spread apart within an application is when I isolate mission control to that SINGLE application.

Expose didnt group anything and it was *very* fast switching between documents for anyone who multitasks. I found Expose on Snow Leopard so good that I didnt need to use spaces.

Dale Sorel
Sep 16, 2011, 09:54 PM
Ok, a scenario then:

If I have 6 documents open in photoshop, 3 in illustrator and 2 in indesign, I *should* have a total of 11 windows spread apart when activating mission control. Instead, I have only THREE and I have no way of previewing/selecting windows behind the one in front thats displayed as theyre all cascading.

The only time it displays all windows spread apart within an application is when I isolate mission control to that SINGLE application.

Expose didnt group anything and it was *very* fast switching between documents for anyone who multitasks. I found Expose on Snow Leopard so good that I didnt need to use spaces.

If I'm understanding you correctly, if you had all three apps loaded onto one desktop, then once you activate Mission Control you would have three groups of windows that can each be spread apart using your scroll wheel (sorry, I don't have a touchpad), right? Then you could very easily move your windows into different desktops, if that's what works for you. I currently have seven windows open on my Finder desktop and just tried it and it seems to work fine.

So you do in fact have a way of selecting the windows in back and doing with them as you see fit.

wikus
Sep 16, 2011, 11:46 PM
If I'm understanding you correctly, if you had all three apps loaded onto one desktop, then once you activate Mission Control you would have three groups of windows that can each be spread apart using your scroll wheel (sorry, I don't have a touchpad), right? Then you could very easily move your windows into different desktops, if that's what works for you. I currently have seven windows open on my Finder desktop and just tried it and it seems to work fine.

So you do in fact have a way of selecting the windows in back and doing with them as you see fit.

I dont want to use several desktops. I multitask between applications when working on ONE single project so I need to be within *one* single desktop.

And no, the scroll wheel does not spread out the grouped windows, it only slightly enlarges them when scrolling up or scales them back down when scrolling down.

Like I said, Mission Control is a complete disaster. Even for those who do use Spaces, theres no way of rearranging the order of spaces.

Dale Sorel
Sep 16, 2011, 11:54 PM
I dont want to use several desktops. I multitask between applications when working on ONE single project so I need to be within *one* single desktop.

If you don't want to use different desktops, then Mission Control obviously isn't for you.

And no, the scroll wheel does not spread out the grouped windows, it only slightly enlarges them when scrolling up or scales them back down when scrolling down.

For me, it does indeed spread them out quite a bit.

Like I said, Mission Control is a complete disaster. Even for those who do use Spaces, theres no way of rearranging the order of spaces.

I guess we are all entitled to our opinions.

hayesk
Sep 16, 2011, 11:59 PM
If you don't want to use different desktops, then Mission Control obviously isn't for you.


Huh? Have you noticed what's going on in the bottom three quarters of the screen in Mission Control.

Dale Sorel
Sep 17, 2011, 12:25 AM
Huh? Have you noticed what's going on in the bottom three quarters of the screen in Mission Control.

You mean how you get an Exposè view of the current desktop? In my mind, that's meant to make it easier to distribute windows to different desktops, which is the reason for my comment.

dba415
Sep 17, 2011, 01:28 AM
spotlight search gets me the app I want faster so yeah

wikus
Sep 17, 2011, 01:31 AM
If you don't want to use different desktops, then Mission Control obviously isn't for you.

*facepalm*

Ok, click here; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktTNcj0fAM4

Skip passed to 1:34 and that is EXACTLY what I need. I dont want photoshops windows grouped. I want *all* windows spread out.

A simple option in Mission Control that says 'group application windows' would solve this problem.

And here, just for you:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocUDmk6bcoY

^notice that all firefox windows are grouped together when activating mission control? And notice how the preview BARELY enlarge when I scroll UP to expand them?

Like I said, Apple really screwed up Expose. They 'fixed' something that was never broken.

Alpha male
Sep 17, 2011, 02:16 AM
+1 on wiku's statement on Apple screwing up expose.

I frequently have at least 5-6 pdf files opened on one space, another 3-4 cad tool windows on another, etc. and its a pain in the ass to switch to a specific window in an instant. Really slows my pace down.


And wow Dale Sorel not only do you have trouble understanding simple problems, you also have trouble typing English. Seriously your posts make my head hurt.

Dale Sorel
Sep 17, 2011, 02:45 AM
Like I said, Apple really screwed up Expose. They 'fixed' something that was never broken.
Like I said, we are all entitled to our opinion.

----------

And wow Dale Sorel not only do you have trouble understanding simple problems, you also have trouble typing English. Seriously your posts make my head hurt.

I guess you have a problem reading complete sentences. Sorry about that, Alpha male, I'll try working on my posts just for you.

NorthDakota91
Sep 17, 2011, 01:58 PM
Wasn't this thread about Launchpad? O.o

mrsir2009
Sep 17, 2011, 02:22 PM
Wasn't this thread about Launchpad? O.o

Yeah. Was.

Patriot24
Sep 17, 2011, 05:46 PM
To me the natural workflow is to have my most often used apps in the dock and gesture into Launchpad when I need to access any other apps.

If you have arranged your apps in such a way that they are easy to get at (I have all of mine on one single page) then I can't imagine any faster way to get at apps than gesture + click on the app.

With spotlight you have to type. With the applications folder you might have to scroll. With all of that said, it isn't perfect. The aforementioned issues around uninstaller files, some apps not being recognized, etc.

Use what makes the most sense to you. It doesn't mean it isn't useful for others. I find it a bit brash to characterize all users of a feature as illiterates or idiots. Personal preference.

ljonesj
Sep 17, 2011, 06:43 PM
For me i dont like launchpad for lion. I rather use the the applications folder and icons in my dock this is the way i like to use my os to others set it up the way you want it.

reputationZed
Sep 17, 2011, 08:53 PM
Same here. My dock is now reserved for running applications and folder shortcuts. Once you clean up and organize LaunchPad it's quite useful.
I keep a clean dock as well. Just running apps and a few folders. I use Launchbar 90% of the time. It never even occurs to me to use Launchpad. LP also looks horrible on a large monitor.

dzigg
Sep 18, 2011, 10:24 PM
Surprisingly, I use it quite often, especially when I'm going solo with my right hand (that sounds dirty, lol).. I like to use gestures and incorporate it to my daily usage more and more..

I use alfred if I have two hands on the keyboard tho'..

Ledgem
Sep 18, 2011, 10:42 PM
Like I said, Apple really screwed up Expose. They 'fixed' something that was never broken.
I like Mission Control, but that's partly because Expose was screwed up in 10.6. Having all windows scaled to be equivalent sizes and bringing up the dock really ruined it. I used Expose all the time before 10.6. I'm using Mission Control almost as much as I used Expose before 10.6, and I'm using different spaces, too. I just wish they'd make spaces work better with multiple monitors.

Back to the topic, I've been trying to use Launchpad, but in general I don't because I already had a solution. When 10.5 introduced "stacks" I created a folder with aliases for my most-used programs and turned it into a stack. It was a "Start menu" of sorts. Over time I further customized it to have folders that grouped programs. It's much faster than Launchpad, in part because the icons are larger (and I could customize the icons for folders that grouped certain programs), and in part because there are far fewer icons. Programs that I use much less often are usually called up through Spotlight.

Granted, setting up that stack takes a bit more effort than accessing Launchpad, but it was definitely worth it. I was hoping for Launchpad back when we were on 10.4; Stacks wasn't a solution set up by the operating system, but it worked perfectly for the task.

vitzr
Sep 19, 2011, 11:18 PM
I deleted the LaunchPad file in disgust. It just bothered me that Apple could piss way time coding this asinine thing instead of working on other aspects of Lion that need attention.

I feel the same way.

While I don't use it, the problem is the intent behind it that reveals Apples desire to dumb down OS X. Perhaps Apples after the couch potato set.

Yeah, let's make it as mind numbing as TV.

yojitani
Sep 19, 2011, 11:38 PM
FWW Launchpad is completely pointless for me. I don't think I ever would have seen the point either. Launchpad is a mess of applications and if you want to create a folder (which I tried when I first installed Lion), good luck to you!

Mission Control: I agree with the gripes. I don't like it. Apple ruined a perfectly good function IMO.

Surely
Sep 19, 2011, 11:49 PM
I use Spotlight to launch applications.

navier
Sep 20, 2011, 12:09 AM
I wish my 2010 MBP could launch it with the Dashboard-key (without 3rd party software)

eric/
Sep 20, 2011, 12:09 AM
It's a lot easier for me to hit the launchpad button and bring up all my apps than to use spotlight or any other method. That's why/when I use it.

satkin2
Sep 20, 2011, 05:06 AM
I've grown to like it. I've got three pages, one with my initially installed apple apps, one with my non apple apps and one with development apps.

I find this really helps my workflow. If I'm developing I don't have to look through all of my apps in teh app folder to choose the one i want, I've got them all together easily accessible from any screen.

It's personal choice obviously, but I made a decision to try it and persist with it to see if I could get used to it. I now find it as quick as using spotlight as I know where all of my icons will be on the screen.

tkermit
Sep 20, 2011, 07:25 AM
the problem is the intent behind it that reveals Apples desire to dumb down OS X. Perhaps Apples after the couch potato set.

Yeah, let's make it as mind numbing as TV.

:rolleyes: They didn't take anything away by adding Launchpad. All of the necessary and welcome complexity offered by the Finder, Spotlight and 3rd-party apps is still there. Launchpad does nothing more than offer you an additional way to easily and quickly get into your applications. Why not make this as simple as possible? What's wrong with making application launching even more accessible? Should this really be a chore or exercise your brain???

Benbikeman
Sep 20, 2011, 09:07 AM
if you want to create a folder (which I tried when I first installed Lion), good luck to you!
It couldn't be simpler: drag one icon on top of another, voila, both are in a new folder.

Chase R
Sep 20, 2011, 11:37 PM
I wish there was a way to disable it.

wilfried
Sep 21, 2011, 12:41 AM
I wish there was a way to disable it.
Take it off your dock, disable the hot corner, and you never have to see it again. Is that not good enough?

wikus
Sep 21, 2011, 01:27 AM
Take it off your dock, disable the hot corner, and you never have to see it again. Is that not good enough?

I have this weird feeling that its still running in the background...

Chase R
Sep 21, 2011, 01:33 AM
Take it off your dock, disable the hot corner, and you never have to see it again. Is that not good enough?

It's more of an OCD thing.

wilfried
Sep 21, 2011, 11:27 PM
Then Lion isn't your problem.

Lokheed
Sep 21, 2011, 11:44 PM
yes.


I like a minimal dock

Finally a voice of reason! +5!!

blackomega31
Sep 22, 2011, 02:42 AM
I have this weird feeling that its still running in the background...

Agreed I also hate launchpad. When I first saw this at the back to Mac event I was displeased. Then when i downgraded from SL to lion I saw that I could take it off my dock and turn off key bindings. Apple still forced it on me whenever I used the app store the app would fly into launchpad and also launchpad would always show as the top of spotlight when I used any apps beginning with L and no matter how many times I Would change it spotlight would not learn. Apple should keep SL for the apple loyalists and market lion to the idiot newbs

blackomega31
Sep 22, 2011, 02:56 AM
*facepalm*

Ok, click here; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktTNcj0fAM4

Skip passed to 1:34 and that is EXACTLY what I need. I dont want photoshops windows grouped. I want *all* windows spread out.

A simple option in Mission Control that says 'group application windows' would solve this problem.

And here, just for you:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocUDmk6bcoY

^notice that all firefox windows are grouped together when activating mission control? And notice how the preview BARELY enlarge when I scroll UP to expand them?

Like I said, Apple really screwed up Expose. They 'fixed' something that was never broken.

One of the reasons why I switched to Mac. Could you hear them cheering after the first demo. It hurts so much to see them pervert this dream with mission control. Lion took away all of that apple "magic" that made their systems a pleasure to use. I had to go back to snow leopard to get this back. And the sad part is when I am able to afford a new imac I will be forced to use lion and that may force me to go to windows 8. Having the god awful ribbon interface shoved down my throat is the lesser of two evils

baryon
Sep 22, 2011, 03:31 AM
I like the idea of having my apps all in one place, as I often don't remember the exact name of an app (Activity Monitor vs. System Monitor vs. Performance Monitor, I never know which one it is…). I also sometimes don't even know what I want so I just like to see what's available, like at the supermarket.

But I hate the 4 finger gesture, it's just impossible to get it right each time.

I also hate that it's so hard to move icons from one place to another and the way you can't rename the apps. Some have very long names. I also hate that uninsallers also appear there, and all other crap from obscure folders that you would never want to see, ever.

I don't like how you can't drag files to apps in Launchpad, to open the file with the given app. You can only do that with the Dock, which makes Launchpad less useful. I'd rather just have everything I use in the dock, and things I rarely use I'll just search for or whatever.

Launchpad is far from useful!

yojitani
Sep 25, 2011, 10:02 PM
It couldn't be simpler: drag one icon on top of another, voila, both are in a new folder.

Maybe you have a short list of apps. Getting Chrome, Safari, Rockmelt, Opera, Firefox etc. together in a folder took about 30 mins. It wasn't like Chrome actually wanted to move on to the next page. I can't even remember how I did it now!

mrsir2009
Sep 26, 2011, 02:10 AM
I wish there was a way to disable it.

Why do you NEED to disable it? You can just not use it without having to disable it. Jesus...

sOwL
Sep 26, 2011, 07:43 AM
I use a Launchpad alternative. It's called 'Spotlight', and its brilliant :) It has also been there for ages you know... heh

mactmaster
Sep 26, 2011, 11:40 AM
For a while I tried forcing myself to use Launchpad by disabling application search in spotlight... it works ok but getting in an out of launchpad is much more cumbersome than a quick spotlight search. Also, folders in Launchpad are just too slow to work with, the "folders" work ok on iOS but on a mac the interface doesn't quite feel right. I also removed all dock items and keep the dock only for running applications.

I have since turned spotlight back on but I now find myself using a mix of both spotlight and Launchpad. I still keep the dock only for running applications.

bencnorden
Sep 26, 2011, 12:48 PM
Personally I very rarely use it. Faster to add items to the dock or to spotlight search. However I think it does have SOME potential. Maybe if you could add any file,folder or shortcut to it? For quicker access to a certain webpage? Or preferences pane perhaps? Just my opinion. :)

Shivetya
Sep 27, 2011, 04:52 AM
Nope, don't use it.

Now I am curious when the top bar goes away, its going to happen one day. Now if they could find a way to do that 7 search function (because I always know what app I want - I just don't want to find it) without hosing the deskop up I would love it.

As in, imagine being able to type anywhere on the desktop and have it search your system... just click in an open area ...

coteyr
Sep 27, 2011, 05:04 AM
Honestly I just use Alfred. Some times I use Pathfinders Launcher or spotlight when Alfred is being a pain. I never use launchpad unless I accidentally gesture for it when trying to get mission control.

Chase R
Sep 27, 2011, 07:01 PM
Spotlight just seems more practical. No searching through screens or folders of apps. Quite faster too.

chocolatejeff
Sep 28, 2011, 10:35 PM
yes.


I like a minimal dock

That's why I use it :)

wikus
Sep 28, 2011, 11:16 PM
I hope the developer(s) behind Onyx find a way to completely disable launchpad. I don't use dashboard, so thankfully Onyx gives me the option to turn it off and save me some processor power and memory.

Simply removing launchpad from the dock only does just that. Its still running in the background and this is true when you download an app via app store.

If I want it completely gone and have no use for it (as many others here share the same feeling towards launchpad) there SHOULD be an option to *completely* disable it.

I want this useless shortcut app gone.

scarred
Sep 29, 2011, 12:31 AM
I hope the developer(s) behind Onyx find a way to completely disable launchpad. I don't use dashboard, so thankfully Onyx gives me the option to turn it off and save me some processor power and memory.

Simply removing launchpad from the dock only does just that. Its still running in the background and this is true when you download an app via app store.

If I want it completely gone and have no use for it (as many others here share the same feeling towards launchpad) there SHOULD be an option to *completely* disable it.

I want this useless shortcut app gone.

Your complaints earlier in this thread were all about Mission Control. I tend to agree Mission Control is trying to be too many things. But Launch Pad isn't that bad. It is just an iPad view of your applications. It isn't hurting anything on your computer.

If the iPad can handle running LaunchPad with it's 512meg memory and arm cpu, and not have any issues at all, I'm sure it isn't causing even the slightest little bump for macs.

Some people like it, some people don't. There really is no need to remove it, and there especially isn't any reason to fret over it.

iBug2
Sep 29, 2011, 06:27 AM
I use it on my MacBook Pro because the gesture to bring it up is much faster than going to dock. I don't use it at all on my Mac Pro.

lexar
Sep 29, 2011, 01:16 PM
I am comnig from PC's and have never owned a Mac.
I would consider myself a power user with many applications and utilities installed.
I cannot believe that people would prefer to type the name in spotlight or fill up their docks with applications.
Sure if you have 2-5 applications that you use then that makes sense but if you have a lot more it is not manageable.

In windows I can create a folder in my start menu and organize how I wish.
So if I want all my media applications together, or all my utilities, or whatever its quite easy and inuitive.
In Mac putting the application folder on your doc is ok (or at least better then spotlight since very few of the many applications I have installed I actually remember the name until I see it) However it is quite limited in administrative ability since a lot of the applications you cannot move into other folders without creating alias etc..
I just find in windows it was a LOT simpler to do.

However with Launchpad you have functionality where you can easily group, move, organize how you wish. Granted its far from perfect but at least it gives you something that the other methods cannot do.

wikus
Sep 29, 2011, 02:04 PM
In Mac putting the application folder on your doc is ok (or at least better then spotlight since very few of the many applications I have installed I actually remember the name until I see it) However it is quite limited in administrative ability since a lot of the applications you cannot move into other folders without creating alias etc..
I just find in windows it was a LOT simpler to do.

You can create a folder anywhere on the hard drive, with subfolders and aliases/shortcuts to any application you like. Take the base folder and drag it to your dock and presto, you've got manageable shortcuts organized by folder.

tkermit
Sep 29, 2011, 02:12 PM
You can create a folder anywhere on the hard drive, with subfolders and aliases/shortcuts to any application you like. Take the base folder and drag it to your dock and presto, you've got manageable shortcuts organized by folder.

The only problem with that is you now have to take care of 'synchronizing' your shortcut folders with the application folder whenever your app folder changes. Something that is not necessary with Launchpad.

wikus
Sep 29, 2011, 02:29 PM
The only problem with that is you now have to take care of 'synchronizing' your shortcut folders with the application folder whenever your app folder changes. Something that is not necessary with Launchpad.

Thats true but most people don't move their application to another folder once its been installed. I know for some applications moving them around to a new location from the defualt will mess things up (adobe creative suite, for example, messes up, or at least used to, with updates and such).

Still, for most people once they install it they'll *probably* move it to a folder of their choice before they make their shortcuts the way i described.

I've never had the urge to move applications out of the applications folder though, except for the creative suite, I wish it were moved into one single folder (thereby keeping things organized, the root applications folder is very messy imo otherwise). I won't do it because ive had a bad experience doing it, so i just leave every install as stock.

talmy
Sep 29, 2011, 02:46 PM
I'm surprised that with all these posts nobody ever questioned the OP's statement:

Aside from Launchpad, there is nothing else iOS-like about Lion. It's still OSX, just with more features and improvements. But again, that's except for Launchpad.

Autosave/Resume, "Natural" Scrolling, disappearing scrollbars, built-in full screen support, poor support for multiple displays. These are changes from Snow Leopard to Lion that are iOS-like.

In windows I can create a folder in my start menu and organize how I wish.
So if I want all my media applications together, or all my utilities, or whatever its quite easy and inuitive.
In Mac putting the application folder on your doc is ok (or at least better then spotlight since very few of the many applications I have installed I actually remember the name until I see it) However it is quite limited in administrative ability since a lot of the applications you cannot move into other folders without creating alias etc..
I just find in windows it was a LOT simpler to do.

It has already been pointed out that one can make a folder heirarchy of aliases and put that in the dock to get something like the Start menu. It should also be pointed out that that is exactly how the Windows Start menu works! c:\Documents and Settings\your user name or "All Users"\Start Menu are the hierarchies of folders containing aliases to your programs in Windows. And since Windows has no single Applications folder it is more difficult to add applications to the Start menu than it is to add to the Mac menus.

bp1000
Sep 29, 2011, 06:27 PM
Nothing is quicker than cmd + spacebar + type

Plus i can never seem to get out of launchpad with gestures, getting in works fine :D

DeaconGTG
Sep 29, 2011, 06:36 PM
Nope. Don't use it. Got no huge beef's with it, but launching programs from Spotlight is pretty much second nature for me at this point.

blackomega31
Sep 29, 2011, 07:54 PM
Nothing is quicker than cmd + spacebar + type

Plus i can never seem to get out of launchpad with gestures, getting in works fine :D

Exactly. Your hands are already there in that position nothing is faster or easier then spotlight. Launchpad is eye candy nothing more. You activate it and then you still have to go through pages and folders if you have created them. Hands down it you have a keyboard there is no point in using launchpad

If the iPad ran lion instead of iOS I would use launchpad cause it makes sense on that model. But as we all know, apple has stated they won't make a touchscreen desktop.

blackomega31
Sep 29, 2011, 07:58 PM
I hope the developer(s) behind Onyx find a way to completely disable launchpad. I don't use dashboard, so thankfully Onyx gives me the option to turn it off and save me some processor power and memory.

Simply removing launchpad from the dock only does just that. Its still running in the background and this is true when you download an app via app store.

If I want it completely gone and have no use for it (as many others here share the same feeling towards launchpad) there SHOULD be an option to *completely* disable it.

I want this useless shortcut app gone.

I agree totally. Launchpad is useless And for all you lion lovers that say just drag it off your dock and forget about it. It's still there if you use the app store
I want an option to disable it completely. I was able to delete the launchpad application from the apps folder but it's still there

I'm fine with the app store flying apps into my dock cause I have choice
Weather they stay or go

benmrii
Sep 29, 2011, 09:40 PM
I'm surprised so many people like it, even more that people use it. Personally I think it's one of the dumber things they've added... I prefer a minimal dock and nothing on my desktop, but Launchpad is a sluggish means of working through a list of applications.

Faster than Launchpad:
Shift-Command-A opens the applications folder, type the first letter of the app name
Command-Space opens the Spotlight search bubble and you can launch the app from the results.

liquidsuns
Sep 29, 2011, 10:00 PM
I use it all the time and really like it. My dock just has Finder, System Preferences, Trash Can, LaunchPad and Mission control (the last two I don't really need there either). Everything else I just launch from the Pad.

Jenni8
Sep 29, 2011, 11:38 PM
At first it was frustrating. It would rest after a restart after being organized. That was fixed after the last update. But instead of trying to hide them with a small app I found, I compromised

(I just created a headache when I DID use it. After restart all the hidden apps reappeared and then I had duplicates. I had to figure out how to reset the whole thing, which worked, and started over.)

I got rid of that app and just put all the apps I'd prefer to hide on the next page, as everything else is on my first page of Launchpad.

I reorganized my apps in such folders and kept out the most used ones.

I also love a minimal dock and only use it for open apps and my downloads folder, trash and kept the apps folder to easy delete my apps if I need to.

I also figured a way to change the color of the folders and inside the folder as well. Red just Pops more, although I could change it to anything really.

I also changed my background for Mission Control and Dashboard.

So I've learned to love Launchpad after some organization visual modifications.

First thing I had to do before I did anything else was use BetterTouchTool to make a custom gesture to open launchpad, as to me it's useless in efficiency when that's not enabled. Apple should have created a gesture for the magic mouse and not JUST the touchpad. Gotta Love BTT for that and so much more. It makes it needless to even GET a touchpad as I already have the magic mouse.

Here is a bit of advice, make it YOURS and you may love it too. I just had to tweak with some things to get the whole system setup right for me before I could appreciate the features. Eventually the red will bore me and I'll change it.

Let me know if anyone is interested in how I changed the color. It was quite easy once I found the right files. It took a little guess work as I found nothing helpful on the internet as to which files to change, as least then when it was newer.

wikus
Sep 29, 2011, 11:51 PM
If Launchpad is supposed to be a benefit, then the dock would need to go. The dock is *needed* for launchpad to be used, and that takes up about 85pixels of height in screen space, more or less depending on the size of your dock.

Everything to the left or right of the dock where there is extra space does not get used, windows basically float JUST above the dock.

Therefor, slimming down the dock horizontally doesnt make a difference, or much for most users.

I understand how some people like to have only 4 icons or less in their dock (to me that looks empty), but I for one would prefer to have my most used applications at the bottom at ALL TIMES. I don't want to have to go through the launchpad just to get to my applications.

Given that a shortcut folder with aliases can be brought into the dock itself or the entire applications folder if you wanna go nuts and even then you get to customize how the icons are displayed (list, fan and grid, which makes grid look more or less exactly like launchpad).

All that said, launchpad is mostly useless.

However, there is no reason why:

a) it can continue to exist in OS X
b) have the option of being disabled
c) have the option of being disabled AND completely removed

A simple option would alleviate this problem for all noobs/power users of OS X and everyone in between.

Idartalis
Sep 30, 2011, 03:38 AM
I used to dislike it until I got Launchpad Control and removed all these folders from Launchpad, now it's not that bad.

Probably would like it even more if there were a way to arrange (well, I can do that already but it's no fun to drag the icons all the time) and/or remove the icons without using 3rd party software.

talmy
Sep 30, 2011, 09:55 AM
Launchpad.app takes up 1.2MB, or about .001% of even the smallest hard drive you might have. Why worry about it?

Jenni8
Sep 30, 2011, 03:30 PM
I used to dislike it until I got Launchpad Control and removed all these folders from Launchpad, now it's not that bad.

Probably would like it even more if there were a way to arrange (well, I can do that already but it's no fun to drag the icons all the time) and/or remove the icons without using 3rd party software.

Yeah that's the app I tried, and I LOVED it, that was until I restarted my computer and it all got screwed up. All the hidden icons came back and created DUPLICATES. It was horrible, I had to figure out how to reset the entire Launchpad. I gave up with that app, although I loved the features, but Lion had to reset it all and debunked the whole purpose. I just changed my method of organization, and now I LOVE launchpad. I will use Launchpad for some things, and Quicksilver for others I don't use as often. I like it better than having a cluttered dock.

bill-p
Sep 30, 2011, 07:03 PM
Autosave/Resume, "Natural" Scrolling, disappearing scrollbars, built-in full screen support, poor support for multiple displays. These are changes from Snow Leopard to Lion that are iOS-like.

Autosave and resume are not iOS-only features. Autosave has been around long before iOS came about, and there is nothing like Resume on iOS. There is nothing in iOS that allows reverting back to a previous version of a document. In fact... even undoing is quite limited on iOS.

"Natural" scrolling has arguably been done before, at least on Windows, and it's not iOS-like since it's just reversing the scroll direction rather than follow finger movement like in iOS.

Fullscreen is activated via a switch, and arguably not an iOS-like feature as there have existed apps that support their own fullscreen modes since long ago on OSX.

Disappearing scrollbars are arguably the next feature that I admit is quite iOS-like, but there is a big difference: you can hover the mouse cursor over and drag just the scrollbars or click on a spot to jump instantly to a part of the page. On iOS, the scrollbars don't behave as such.

toolbox
Sep 30, 2011, 08:58 PM
Nope i do not use it.

talmy
Sep 30, 2011, 11:57 PM
Autosave and resume are not iOS-only features. Autosave has been around long before iOS came about, and there is nothing like Resume on iOS. There is nothing in iOS that allows reverting back to a previous version of a document. In fact... even undoing is quite limited on iOS.

The guidelines for iOS programming and indeed the API has support for autosave and resume. The ability for the OS to shut off an app to regain space and restart it later has been available in iOS at least since it has supported multiple running applications. As usual, it is up to the application writer to take advantage of these facilities. Most Apple provided apps (thinking here of Music, Notes, Safari, Contacts... I use these frequently) autosave and resume and always have.

I never said that Versions was in iOS. That's only for now in OS X.

"Natural" scrolling has arguably been done before, at least on Windows, and it's not iOS-like since it's just reversing the scroll direction rather than follow finger movement like in iOS.

Arguable. There was no reason to change the direction in OS X except to have it match iOS. In OS X you used to scroll further into a document by scrolling down, now you scroll up, just like iOS.

Fullscreen is activated via a switch, and arguably not an iOS-like feature as there have existed apps that support their own fullscreen modes since long ago on OSX.

"apps that support their own fullscreen modes" however OSX support for fullscreen has only appeared in Lion. iOS supports only fullscreen apps.

Wild-Bill
Oct 1, 2011, 12:02 AM
Don't like it. I prefer the folder in my Dock. I also hate Mission Control and want Expose back! This is on my new MBA.

I will not put my Mac Pro through the agony of Lion at this time.......

iBug2
Oct 4, 2011, 04:35 AM
Nothing is quicker than cmd + spacebar + type

Plus i can never seem to get out of launchpad with gestures, getting in works fine :D

If you remember the name of the app, yes.

roadbloc
Oct 4, 2011, 06:37 AM
If you remember the name of the app, yes.
If you're forgetting the names of Apps and have to read through a whole list of them (ie Stacks, Launchpad or Application Folder) to be reminded of it, I suggest you quit using a computer all together.

tkermit
Oct 4, 2011, 07:03 AM
If you're forgetting the names of Apps and have to read through a whole list of them (ie Stacks, Launchpad or Application Folder) to be reminded of it, I suggest you quit using a computer all together.

Huh,...why? There are certain apps I remember foremost by their icon not by their name, especially infrequently used ones. For example, the icons for XLD or Minco sure make it easy to identify the app.
http://f.cl.ly/items/3h0J1h02003j0U0n1m0w/xld.jpg http://f.cl.ly/items/152P2Y0j1P3m332j0S1W/minco.jpg

ozaz
Oct 9, 2011, 04:22 PM
I've just started using Launchpad after disregarding it since Lion's launch. I think the virtual folders have good potential. I'm far less likely to forget I've got a small, obscurely-named app if I can categorize it in a folder.

However I'd want to be able to select multiple apps when dragging to a folder and order apps alphabetically.

pchipchip
Oct 9, 2011, 04:32 PM
I tried to start using it more often, but I got an app from the app store that I can just search my computer and the internet with it (called Alfred) kind of like Spotlight.

mrsir2009
Oct 9, 2011, 05:54 PM
Huh,...why? There are certain apps I remember foremost by their icon not by their name, especially infrequently used ones. For example, the icons for XLD or Minco sure make it easy to identify the app.
Image (http://f.cl.ly/items/3h0J1h02003j0U0n1m0w/xld.jpg) Image (http://f.cl.ly/items/152P2Y0j1P3m332j0S1W/minco.jpg)

Plus sometimes you don't know exactly what your looking for. For example, if your looking for a game to play, you can go on lauchpad and see your choices.

JDrive
Oct 9, 2011, 09:00 PM
I use spotlight to launch applications that are not in my dock. I have never not known the name of the application I am trying to launch, but I could see how launchpad would be useful in those situations. It's also much friendlier/quicker than browsing through the Applications folder in finder.

reputationZed
Oct 9, 2011, 09:15 PM
Huh,...why? There are certain apps I remember foremost by their icon not by their name, especially infrequently used ones. For example, the icons for XLD or Minco sure make it easy to identify the app.
Image (http://f.cl.ly/items/3h0J1h02003j0U0n1m0w/xld.jpg) Image (http://f.cl.ly/items/152P2Y0j1P3m332j0S1W/minco.jpg)

Using LP to find infrequently used programs is probably the best argument I've heard for finding some redeeming value in the program. My problem with the argument is that if I'm only using LP to launch infrequently used programs am I even going to think of LP when the need arises or am I just going to open he apps folder in Finder and hunt around. LP may be a more efficient way to find seldom used apps but I think I far more likely just to hunt around in finder.

reputationZed
Oct 9, 2011, 09:32 PM
I use spotlight to launch applications that are not in my dock. I have never not known the name of the application I am trying to launch, but I could see how launchpad would be useful in those situations. It's also much friendlier/quicker than browsing through the Applications folder in finder.

I also launch most of my programs by name though I use LaunchBar rather than spotlight. The only programs in my doc are active programs, nothing has permanent residence on the lefthand side of my doc. I'll agree that LaunchPad may be somewhat friendlier/quicker than browsing through the Applications folder in finder, but think 'much friendlier/quicker' is a stretch. I've been browsing through the Finder since Tiger. I don't find LaunchPad offers enough in the friendlier/quicker department to justify learning a new behavior. I'd had some hope for LaunchBar before Lion was released, particularly on small screens like the MBA, but I haven't found a case yet where it offered enough of an improvement to justify learning a new way of doing thinks. I am finding more value in Mission Control, which ironically I initially didn't think I'd use that much.

KingJosh
Mar 5, 2012, 01:20 AM
I have it in my dock for wanting to use it but I never do I always just command space bar and type in what I want with spotlight lol.

The Economist
Mar 5, 2012, 11:39 AM
yes.


I like a minimal dock

Same here. I removed the applications folder from my dock and kept using Spotlight plus Launchpad.

Bear
Mar 5, 2012, 11:58 AM
Either the application I want to use is in the dock, of in the Applications & Utilities folder. Launchpad is a waste of resources as it currently works.