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mantic
Jan 27, 2012, 02:43 PM
Have you guys read these policies yet? Anyone thinking about moving away from your gmail accounts?

Last modified: October 20, 2011 (view archived versions)

This Privacy Policy applies to all of the products, services and websites offered by Google Inc. or its subsidiaries or affiliated companies except Postini (Postini Privacy Policy). Sometimes, we may post product specific privacy notices or Help Center materials to explain our products in more detail.

If you have any questions about this Privacy Policy, please feel free to contact us through our website or write to us at
Privacy Matters
c/o Google Inc.
1600 Amphitheatre Parkway
Mountain View, California, 94043
USA
Information we collect and how we use it

We may collect the following types of information:

Information you provide – When you sign up for a Google Account, we ask you for personal information. We may combine the information you submit under your account with information from other Google services or third parties in order to provide you with a better experience and to improve the quality of our services. For certain services, we may give you the opportunity to opt out of combining such information. You can use the Google Dashboard to learn more about the information associated with your Account. If you are using Google services in conjunction with your Google Apps Account, Google provides such services in conjunction with or on behalf of your domain administrator. Your administrator will have access to your account information including your email. Consult your domain administrator’s privacy policy for more information.
Cookies – When you visit Google, we send one or more cookies to your computer or other device. We use cookies to improve the quality of our service, including for storing user preferences, improving search results and ad selection, and tracking user trends, such as how people search. Google also uses cookies in its advertising services to help advertisers and publishers serve and manage ads across the web and on Google services.
Log information – When you access Google services via a browser, application or other client our servers automatically record certain information. These server logs may include information such as your web request, your interaction with a service, Internet Protocol address, browser type, browser language, the date and time of your request and one or more cookies that may uniquely identify your browser or your account.
User communications – When you send email or other communications to Google, we may retain those communications in order to process your inquiries, respond to your requests and improve our services. When you send and receive SMS messages to or from one of our services that provides SMS functionality, we may collect and maintain information associated with those messages, such as the phone number, the wireless carrier associated with the phone number, the content of the message, and the date and time of the transaction. We may use your email address to communicate with you about our services.
Affiliated Google Services on other sites – We offer some of our services on or through other web sites. Personal information that you provide to those sites may be sent to Google in order to deliver the service. We process such information under this Privacy Policy.
Third Party Applications – Google may make available third party applications, such as gadgets or extensions, through its services. The information collected by Google when you enable a third party application is processed under this Privacy Policy. Information collected by the third party application provider is governed by their privacy policies.
Location data – Google offers location-enabled services, such as Google Maps and Latitude. If you use those services, Google may receive information about your actual location (such as GPS signals sent by a mobile device) or information that can be used to approximate a location (such as a cell ID).
Unique application number – Certain services, such as Google Toolbar, include a unique application number that is not associated with your account or you. This number and information about your installation (e.g., operating system type, version number) may be sent to Google when you install or uninstall that service or when that service periodically contacts our servers (for example, to request automatic updates to the software).
Other sites – This Privacy Policy applies to Google services only. We do not exercise control over the sites displayed as search results, sites that include Google applications, products or services, or links from within our various services. These other sites may place their own cookies or other files on your computer, collect data or solicit personal information from you.

In addition to the above, we may use the information we collect to:

Provide, maintain, protect, and improve our services (including advertising services) and develop new services; and
Protect the rights or property of Google or our users.

If we use this information in a manner different than the purpose for which it was collected, then we will ask for your consent prior to such use.

Google processes personal information on our servers in the United States of America and in other countries. In some cases, we process personal information outside your own country.
Choices

You can use the Google Dashboard to review and control the information stored in your Google Account.

Most browsers are initially set up to accept cookies, but you can reset your browser to refuse all cookies or to indicate when a cookie is being sent. However, some Google features and services may not function properly if your cookies are disabled.

Google uses the DoubleClick advertising cookie on AdSense partner sites and certain Google services to help advertisers and publishers serve and manage ads across the web. You can view and manage your ads preferences associated with this cookie by accessing the Ads Preferences Manager. In addition, you may choose to opt out of the DoubleClick cookie at any time by using DoubleClick’s opt-out cookie.
Information sharing

Google only shares personal information with other companies or individuals outside of Google in the following limited circumstances:

We have your consent. We require opt-in consent for the sharing of any sensitive personal information.
We provide such information to our subsidiaries, affiliated companies or other trusted businesses or persons for the purpose of processing personal information on our behalf. We require that these parties agree to process such information based on our instructions and in compliance with this Privacy Policy and any other appropriate confidentiality and security measures.
We have a good faith belief that access, use, preservation or disclosure of such information is reasonably necessary to (a) satisfy any applicable law, regulation, legal process or enforceable governmental request, (b) enforce applicable Terms of Service, including investigation of potential violations thereof, (c) detect, prevent, or otherwise address fraud, security or technical issues, or (d) protect against harm to the rights, property or safety of Google, its users or the public as required or permitted by law.

If Google becomes involved in a merger, acquisition, or any form of sale of some or all of its assets, we will ensure the confidentiality of any personal information involved in such transactions and provide notice before personal information is transferred and becomes subject to a different privacy policy.
Information security

We take appropriate security measures to protect against unauthorized access to or unauthorized alteration, disclosure or destruction of data. These include internal reviews of our data collection, storage and processing practices and security measures, including appropriate encryption and physical security measures to guard against unauthorized access to systems where we store personal data.

We restrict access to personal information to Google employees, contractors and agents who need to know that information in order to process it on our behalf. These individuals are bound by confidentiality obligations and may be subject to discipline, including termination and criminal prosecution, if they fail to meet these obligations.
Accessing and updating personal information

When you use Google services, we make good faith efforts to provide you with access to your personal information and either to correct this data if it is inaccurate or to delete such data at your request if it is not otherwise required to be retained by law or for legitimate business purposes. We ask individual users to identify themselves and the information requested to be accessed, corrected or removed before processing such requests, and we may decline to process requests that are unreasonably repetitive or systematic, require disproportionate technical effort, jeopardize the privacy of others, or would be extremely impractical (for instance, requests concerning information residing on backup tapes), or for which access is not otherwise required. In any case where we provide information access and correction, we perform this service free of charge, except if doing so would require a disproportionate effort. Because of the way we maintain certain services, after you delete your information, residual copies may take a period of time before they are deleted from our active servers and may remain in our backup systems. Please review the service Help Centers for more information.
Enforcement

Google complies with the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Framework and the U.S.-Swiss Safe Harbor Framework as set forth by the U.S. Department of Commerce regarding the collection, use, and retention of personal information from European Union member countries and Switzerland. Google has certified that it adheres to the Safe Harbor Privacy Principles of notice, choice, onward transfer, security, data integrity, access, and enforcement. To learn more about the Safe Harbor program, and to view Google’s certification, please visit the Safe Harbor website.

Google regularly reviews its compliance with this Privacy Policy. When we receive formal written complaints, it is Google’s policy to contact the complaining user regarding his or her concerns. We will cooperate with the appropriate regulatory authorities, including local data protection authorities, to resolve any complaints regarding the transfer of personal data that cannot be resolved between Google and an individual.
Changes to this Privacy Policy

Please note that this Privacy Policy may change from time to time. We will not reduce your rights under this Privacy Policy without your explicit consent. We will post any Privacy Policy changes on this page and, if the changes are significant, we will provide a more prominent notice (including, for certain services, email notification of Privacy Policy changes). We will also keep prior versions of this Privacy Policy in an archive for your review.

thewitt
Jan 27, 2012, 03:33 PM
Nope. Nothing in there scares me

MacDawg
Jan 27, 2012, 03:38 PM
Nothing on the web is private
Nothing on your phone is private
Nothing in your email is private
Nothing on your computer is private
Nothing

As long as you understand that, you can act accordingly

mantic
Jan 27, 2012, 03:53 PM
Nothing on the web is private
Nothing on your phone is private
Nothing in your email is private
Nothing on your computer is private
Nothing

As long as you understand that, you can act accordingly

I understand that, however, It got a few people around me a little upset.... It seems like it's just making more and more sense to not use free services--such as gmail. I have to be careful when using email that I do not send my confidential work mail through gmail when mobile--it's really easy if you aren't paying close attention.

maril1111
Jan 27, 2012, 03:54 PM
What changed compared to the original privacy policy?

Rodimus Prime
Jan 27, 2012, 04:11 PM
What changed compared to the original privacy policy?

I believe it is simplified and they combined around 60 policies into one. They made it so normal people can understand what is in them.

0dev
Jan 27, 2012, 05:26 PM
All they've really changed is where Google can use the data within their own services. They're making it all more unified using information they already have about you.

Google already knows more about me than my family anyway, and the same is true for most of us, let's face it.

mantic
Jan 27, 2012, 06:14 PM
From what I understand it doesn't really change a lot... However I thought maybe there was something I was missing.. Apparently not.

jackc
Jan 28, 2012, 12:49 PM
Nothing on the web is private
Nothing on your phone is private
Nothing in your email is private
Nothing on your computer is private
Nothing

As long as you understand that, you can act accordingly

Does that make it OK if Google publishes all of your email on the web? (I know Google isn't up to that point yet, just saying)

MacDawg
Jan 28, 2012, 01:54 PM
Does that make it OK if Google publishes all of your email on the web? (I know Google isn't up to that point yet, just saying)

Nope, but it isn't just Google
If you use the web, your data is 'out there'
Facebook, Twitter, et. al. and anywhere you sign up for anything or have a profile of any kind

And nobody really believes Google is going to publish all your emails (who would even be interested?)
It is a matter of the security of the data and its use
There is always a risk in using ANY service

You are no more secure with Yahoo Mail, Hotmail, or any other mail
Not even your work's enterprise mail with an Exchange server

If someone is concerned about privacy and security they need to encrypt their emails before sending by using cryptographic software or something like these (http://www.brighthub.com/computing/smb-security/articles/38933.aspx), and even then it isn't foolproof

0dev
Jan 28, 2012, 01:57 PM
I have a fair amount of trust in Google's ability to keep themselves secure. They have some very smart people working for them and trust is what their business is built on and I doubt they'll want anything wrecking that. Plus, all the privacy regulators in the world have their hawk eyes on them. Therefore, security will be top priority.

jnpy!$4g3cwk
Jan 28, 2012, 02:13 PM
OK, so, what alternatives are there for:

- Search

- Email

- Earth


Those are the main services that I use Google for.

NutsNGum
Jan 28, 2012, 02:56 PM
I always find it funny that whenever any company updates their privacy policies, folk jump on it like they've added a clause saying they reserve the right going to slay your first-born.

0dev
Jan 28, 2012, 02:59 PM
I always find it funny that whenever any company updates their privacy policies, folk jump on it like they've added a clause saying they reserve the right going to slay your first-born.

Same thing happens every time Facebook changes any sort of minute detail, but no one ever seems to leave :p

Surely
Jan 28, 2012, 03:12 PM
I just wish I didn't receive half a dozen identical emails about it.....

0dev
Jan 28, 2012, 03:13 PM
I just wish I didn't receive half a dozen identical emails about it.....

7 and counting over here.

mrsir2009
Jan 28, 2012, 03:34 PM
OK, so, what alternatives are there for:

- Search

- Email

- Earth


Those are the main services that I use Google for.

Lol are you saying there are no decent email servies other than Gmail?

0dev
Jan 28, 2012, 03:37 PM
Lol are you saying there are no decent email servies other than Gmail?

Actually, he has a point. The only real alternatives I can think of are Hotmail and Yahoo, both of which suck.

Of course, you can always set up your own mail server if you have a super nerd/paranoia combo :p

mrsir2009
Jan 28, 2012, 03:49 PM
Actually, he has a point. The only real alternatives I can think of are Hotmail and Yahoo, both of which suck.

Of course, you can always set up your own mail server if you have a super nerd/paranoia combo :p

Or you could use a desktop client so it doen't matter which provider your with...

0dev
Jan 28, 2012, 04:54 PM
Or you could use a desktop client so it doen't matter which provider your with...

It'd still matter because you're still relying on them to store, send, and receive your e-mail, as well as provide IMAP.

mrsir2009
Jan 28, 2012, 07:45 PM
It'd still matter because you're still relying on them to store, send, and receive your e-mail, as well as provide IMAP.

In my experiences Gmail does that no better than Hotmail or Yahoo.

0dev
Jan 28, 2012, 07:48 PM
In my experiences Gmail does that no better than Hotmail or Yahoo.

They were always less reliable for me, and I got loads of spam on Yahoo. iCloud e-mail also takes ages to send and receive messages for me. Plus I don't believe either Hotmail or Yahoo has two-step verification, and I know iCloud doesn't.

IMHO, GMail still wins.

bdodds1985
Jan 29, 2012, 02:11 AM
google needs to stop pulling up porn every time i type "p" into the search boz. I don't want it every time google, sometimes people are around me. geez.

Gmail is more professional in my opinion. I notice a lot of people I work with in the military all have yahoo or something like it. those same people use names like pimpdaddy83@yahoo.com. no one has a decent email.

plus after reading tucker max I switched to gmail to be one of the cool kids that went to duke. gmail supports tucker max.

Skyrim
Jan 29, 2012, 03:11 AM
Those policies are fine. Google provides good mail services. We provide information. And Google earn money from it. A favor for a favor. There really is no free lunch in the world.

tkermit
Jan 29, 2012, 08:18 AM
OK, so, what alternatives are there for:

- Search

DuckDuckGo


- Email
iCloud


- Earth
Microsoft Virtual Earth


I'm more and more looking at (and using) alternatives to Google.

mrsir2009
Jan 29, 2012, 01:38 PM
DuckDuckGo

DuckDuckGo, like most small search engines, pulls their results from several of the major search engines, one of which is Google ;) The only search engines that are independent of Google are Yahoo! and Bing.

Surely
Jan 29, 2012, 01:55 PM
DuckDuckGo, like most small search engines, pulls their results from several of the major search engines, one of which is Google ;) The only search engines that are independent of Google are Yahoo! and Bing.

While Yahoo! and Bing are independent of Google, they are not independent of each other:

On July 29, 2009, Microsoft and Yahoo! announced a deal in which Bing would power Yahoo! Search. All Yahoo! Search global customers and partners are expected to have made the transition by early 2012.

Third paragraph from here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bing

/just sayin'

mrsir2009
Jan 29, 2012, 01:59 PM
While Yahoo! and Bing are independent of Google, they are not independent of each other:

On July 29, 2009, Microsoft and Yahoo! announced a deal in which Bing would power Yahoo! Search. All Yahoo! Search global customers and partners are expected to have made the transition by early 2012.

Third paragraph from here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bing

/just sayin'

I know ;) But they're independent of Google ;)

Apple OC
Jan 29, 2012, 02:08 PM
I know ;) But they're independent of Google ;)

they all do the same privacy crap ... selling your web habits to anyone who pays them

Rodimus Prime
Jan 29, 2012, 02:12 PM
they all do the same privacy crap ... selling your web habits to anyone who pays them

true that and compare them to Google's you will find out that they are about the same. Only difference is Google's is a lot easier to understand and has less legal jargin.

For me it has no real effect on me has I am pretty tightly wound into Google and their services. Google handles my email, search, contacts, calendar and several other cloud services.

Plus @gmail.com looks a lot more professional than @hotmail.com or @yahoo.com

Sorry but @hotmail.com has the worse mental image with it and @yahoo.com is not much better.

Hellhammer
Jan 29, 2012, 02:20 PM
I have a fair amount of trust in Google's ability to keep themselves secure. They have some very smart people working for them and trust is what their business is built on and I doubt they'll want anything wrecking that. Plus, all the privacy regulators in the world have their hawk eyes on them. Therefore, security will be top priority.

And what would Google gain from publishing emails? Why would they shoot themselves in the head? People would stop using their services and Google would most likely face dozens, if not hundreds, of lawsuits. They may use your personal data for their own purposes but I have zero fear of Google publishing all my details.

I'm far more concerned about SOPAs, ACTAs and all the other nonsense that would allow governments to monitor my data.

MacNut
Jan 29, 2012, 02:21 PM
Other than that policy, who reads them when signing up. Nobody reads the TOS or Privacy policy because they are so convoluted. Google is no different from any other website or email client. They will all track what you do and use it to their advantage. I want all policys to be easy to read without needing a lawyer present. Who knows what you are clicking, maybe you just sold your first born to them. They could throw anything in there and you would never know it but you click accept and don't bother reading 50 pages of legal jargon.

Google is not the one to be worried about, your ISP knows far more about you than Google does.

Don't want Google tracking you, don't log in.

Surely
Jan 29, 2012, 02:29 PM
Don't want Google tracking you, don't log in.

Exactly. I don't see why this is a problem. I'm never logged into Google on my web browser. And if I do need to log into Google for some reason, I always log out when I'm finished doing what I need to do. I use Gmail, but through the Mail.app.

jnpy!$4g3cwk
Jan 29, 2012, 05:03 PM
DuckDuckGo




Thanks! I was not aware of this site. Very nice.


iCloud


Microsoft Virtual Earth


I admit I was thinking of OS-agnostic services.


I'm more and more looking at (and using) alternatives to Google.

Likewise.

Huntn
Jan 30, 2012, 10:47 AM
Anyone have a good link for setting up Google product privacy? I'm thinking primarily of Google Mail. If it's all ready been mentioned in this thread, how about a reply number? Thanks!

mmhere
Jan 30, 2012, 01:27 PM
Anyone have a good link for setting up Google product privacy? I'm thinking primarily of Google Mail. If it's all ready been mentioned in this thread, how about a reply number? Thanks!

Same here. Tried to use one of the many notices I got from Google to track my page where I made sure I opted out of anything I could. Spent an hour trying to find that stuff. Only found where I could read the new policy. Not under my account(s) were I could make sure I've opted out everywhere I can do that.

Besides, I heard that privacy rules across the Internet were changing. Anyone heard about that?

Marcus72
Feb 6, 2012, 07:02 AM
Any fast browser alternatives that's not in bed with Google. really don't want to go back to IE. I was using firefox but they're sleeping with Google too.

MorphingDragon
Feb 6, 2012, 03:03 PM
Any fast browser alternatives that's not in bed with Google. really don't want to go back to IE. I was using firefox but they're sleeping with Google too.

You could run Chromium Builds or webkit nightlys.

chris7777
Feb 15, 2012, 01:05 AM
People would stop using their services and Google would most likely face dozens, if not hundreds, of lawsuits. They may use your personal data for their own purposes but I have zero fear of Google publishing all my details.

I'm far more concerned about SOPAs, ACTAs and all the other nonsense that would allow governments to monitor my data.

Uhh based on many of the comments just in this thread alone, most people just dont care about their privacy anymore.

I mean I am not going to wear a foil hat, but I just don't understand the lay back and let them get their free screw, mentality.

these companies are parasites, and its like everyone wants to trade a little bit of convienence for A LOT of virtual STD.

They should be paying US to use their sites, but of course they have everyone virtually brainwashed to just not care what they do, or who they do it to.

as for data, how many companies have shared their data over the years after "promising" not to?

Google also is overly genreous with out data to the government, As in most cases they just give them what they ask for. http://www.marketwatch.com/story/google-gives-user-data-to-government-in-most-cases-2011-06-27

Not to mention freely handing over european user data, to US government. http://gov2u.org/index.php/blog/158

So much for "dont be evil"

I just cant believe so many don't care in the slightest

MacNut
Feb 15, 2012, 01:09 AM
If you look at what people post to Facebook you will realize that they don't care about privacy or personal filters. The kids just post without thinking about the consequences 20 years later. Google could do what ever they want because people are so open with their data.

Again, don't want Google seeing it, don't post it to the internet.

mrsir2009
Feb 15, 2012, 01:11 AM
If you look at what people post to Facebook you will realize that they don't care about privacy or personal filters. The kids just post without thinking about the consequences 20 years later. Google could do what ever they want because people are so open with their data.

Again, don't want Google seeing it, don't post it to the internet.

FaceBook is much worse than Google IMO.

MacNut
Feb 15, 2012, 01:13 AM
FaceBook is much worse than Google IMO.I agree that Facebook is the bigger threat to privacy going forward, Google has more information now but they are no match for what Facebook will become.

mrsir2009
Feb 15, 2012, 01:22 AM
I agree that Facebook is the bigger threat to privacy going forward, Google has more information now but they are no match for what Facebook will become.

At least employers etc can't see what you've searched on Google :)

0dev
Feb 15, 2012, 11:53 AM
At least employers etc can't see what you've searched on Google :)

Providing you use a fake name and make your wall only available to your friends, they can't search what you've put on Facebook either.

mrsir2009
Feb 15, 2012, 11:58 AM
Providing you use a fake name and make your wall only available to your friends, they can't search what you've put on Facebook either.

Yes, of course. However a lot, if not most people, don't.

0dev
Feb 15, 2012, 12:01 PM
Yes, of course. However a lot, if not most people, don't.

Indeed, so it's their own fault if their stupid comments get them disliked by employers then :p

jasonkrasnov
Feb 22, 2012, 06:28 PM
Thankfully you just need to follow a few simple steps to erase and turn off your search history. See the article below, which outlines 4 steps on how to pause/delete your Google Web History.


http://eduardoangel.com/2012/02/22/how-to-remove-your-google-search-history- before-its-posted-on-youtube/#more-2414
(http://eduardoangel.com/2012/02/22/how-to-remove-your-google-search-history- before-its-posted-on-youtube/#more-2414)

Any thoughts on this?

Share your feedback.

http://eduardoangel.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Web-History-590x261.jpg

Best,

Jason