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Dark
Nov 1, 2005, 09:55 PM
Hey guys whats up? Im and im a sophmore in HS. Over the past year ive really been getting into photography. I am now thinking about becoming a photo journalist. For Christmas this year my parents said I could get a camera. Im currently just using a Sony Cybershot 5 m.p camera. However, I have my mind set on the Canon Digital Rebel XT, I read alot of positive reviews about this camera and after fooling around with it in the store, im in love. Has anyone had experience with this camera before? If so, how was it and would you recommend it? If not, why and what other camera in the same price range would you reccomend. Any input would really be appreciated.



puckhead193
Nov 1, 2005, 10:03 PM
its a good camera, u should look into the nikon D70 and the D70s. having an SLR camera is good because you can swap lens but its pricey. You should look into a nikon coolpix 8800, 8mp, 10x optical zoom, good camera in all

skidknee
Nov 1, 2005, 11:08 PM
In terms of dSLR and the price range, the Rebel XT is unparalleled in price. It is a great price, but consider the fact that sold as just a body or with a kit lens, it can be pricey to get a nicer lens in your hands.

Also, if you are not familiar with custom functions and metering, a dSLR is a huge jump from a point-and-shoot. Even the high end point-and-shoot cameras offer SOME manual functions, but for the price of a SLR, utilizing and making the most of the camera's function would be a good idea, imho.

Of course if you are experienced with the SLR, it is your destiny :p

Otherwise, maybe try a 35mm film camera, get used to the manual functions and focusing. I'm not one to preach, but it does train the eye for something that cannot be fully replicated when one only experiences a digital SLR.

Oh, and I won't go into the whole Nikon or Canon debate. Whichever you go with, you'll have to stick with it, because those lenses are dedicated to that brand, so if you invest, it'll be harder to just "switch".:(

Dark
Nov 1, 2005, 11:40 PM
I have no experience with a dSLR, not gonna lie. However, I dont want my parents to waste their money on another point and shoot and then later down the line ill have to save up for a dSLR. Photography really interests me and if that means me studying the camera manual then so be it.

ericssonboi
Nov 2, 2005, 12:28 AM
The Rebel XT takes amazing pictures..
But at the same time... the lens come a long way..

I used the Rebel XT w/17-85mm lens
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v496/ericssonboi2/IMG_3222335copy1.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v496/ericssonboi2/IMG_3048232copy.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v496/ericssonboi2/Wallpaper2upload.jpg

Don't cheap out on the lens for sure.
If you get the Rebel XT, most of the lens work with the 20D and above..

Another good place to look for deals and more info is..
http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/

skidknee
Nov 2, 2005, 01:29 AM
I have no experience with a dSLR, not gonna lie. However, I dont want my parents to waste their money on another point and shoot and then later down the line ill have to save up for a dSLR. Photography really interests me and if that means me studying the camera manual then so be it.

Yeah, that's true. Although I meant you should get a manual camera, old school style, learn the metering.

Oh, save up and get it yourself. Then you can baby it more. I remember when I saved up for the original Rebel, I basically coddled it until I moved on to the 20D....heheh.

I was just saying that with a dSLR, with interchangable lenses, can be in the range of $1000 and up after costs, whereas with a hand me down 35mm camera, you can learn those SLR functions for a few hundred tops. But really you can find some film SLRs for really cheap and it can get you started to see if you like it.

Obviously just a suggestion, as I jumped into the dSLR world with a splash as well. But I started with a Lomo LC-A, and that taught me a bit about film, manual exposure and metering and such.

http://www.lomography.com

Dark
Nov 2, 2005, 12:51 PM
Thanks alot for all the advice guys. Yeah, if i was to get the Digital Rebel XT I would get it with the lens kit.

dogbone
Nov 2, 2005, 04:19 PM
You might want to check out this (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=158092) thread for some views on the Rebel and D70s

In the end you must go with whatever makes you feel good. But you would be doing yourself a great disservice to ignore the D70s

The Rebel is a bit small and doesn't feel as good and solid to hold as the D70. Another very annoying thing about it is that the hot keys are just menu shortcuts which means you have to keep delving into menus to make changes. Whereas the on D70 you can change white balance, ISO, and Quality and size settings without going into the menu.

In the thread I refer to above I there is some information on the very clever iTTL flash trickyness with the D70

Have a look at thomas klieber's (http://pix.bloemsma.de/album11?page=1) excellent work done on D70 and nikon coolpix4500!

dogbone
Nov 2, 2005, 04:31 PM
I have no experience with a dSLR, not gonna lie. However, I dont want my parents to waste their money on another point and shoot and then later down the line ill have to save up for a dSLR. Photography really interests me and if that means me studying the camera manual then so be it.

The funny thing about "point and shoot" cameras is that they aren't point and shoot. But a camera like the D70s for example while not being a "point and shoot" camera, is in fact a real point and shoot because that is exactly what you can do with it.

cgratti
Nov 2, 2005, 07:29 PM
Hey guys whats up? Im and im a sophmore in HS. Over the past year ive really been getting into photography. I am now thinking about becoming a photo journalist. For Christmas this year my parents said I could get a camera. Im currently just using a Sony Cybershot 5 m.p camera. However, I have my mind set on the Canon Digital Rebel XT, I read alot of positive reviews about this camera and after fooling around with it in the store, im in love. Has anyone had experience with this camera before? If so, how was it and would you recommend it? If not, why and what other camera in the same price range would you reccomend. Any input would really be appreciated.

Definately go Canon. I have the 6.3MP Digital Rebel, love the crap out of it. Get the rebel XT!

ITASOR
Nov 2, 2005, 07:45 PM
Sorry to ask a question in your thread, but along the lines of point and shoot not being ideal for learning photography, and an SLR being a big jump, what's in the middle? I'd like something in the middle if they make such a thing. Maybe like a point and shoot but with a manual focus lens, I have no idea.

dogbone
Nov 2, 2005, 08:29 PM
Sorry to ask a question in your thread, but along the lines of point and shoot not being ideal for learning photography, and an SLR being a big jump, what's in the middle? I'd like something in the middle if they make such a thing. Maybe like a point and shoot but with a manual focus lens, I have no idea.


See my post above regarding point and shoot. A dslr like the nikon D70s is actually a true point and shoot camera. You really can turn it on point and shoot and it will give you a fantastic result.

With regards to what's in the middle keep in mind that what was considered a top of the range point and shoot camera about 4 years ago, the nikon 4500 cost the same price then as the dslr D70 nikon costs now! and the 4500 was sloooooow to use.

Dark
Nov 3, 2005, 07:56 PM
Ok, well im pretty sure im going with the Canon. Now I had some money saved up so I just ordered a 1 gig crucial ram stick. I know ram is important especially when dealing with photography/photoshopping. What other things would you suggest. I was thinking about an external hardrive and maybe Adobe Elements. I was going to buy it but i dont want to get 3.0 and then all of a sudden 4.0 comes out.

tech4all
Nov 3, 2005, 08:16 PM
Yea I would definitely recommend some extra storage space such as an external hard drive. Those Photoshop files can really add up fast.

As far as software is concerned, I'm don't follow Photoshop Elements (as opposed to regular Photoshop) too much so I'm not sure of the versions there. You could wait for PE 4.0 and in the mean time use iPhoto. Then there's Aperture coming out this month from Apple. So there are plenty of apps for you to choose from.

:)

Dark
Nov 3, 2005, 08:58 PM
Ok, Now i was thinking about getting my parents to get it at Best-Buy so I can get a good warantee on it and know if i ever have a problem im fine. What is the kit lens that comes with it good for. I was looking at this website that has literally INSANE PACKAGE DEALS, i would order in a heartbeat but i have a big feeling i would get scammed. Just take a look

http://www.expresscameras.com/prodetails.asp?prodid=306299&start=1
Look at the Essential Package. Theres no way that can be possible.

gwuMACaddict
Nov 3, 2005, 09:21 PM
i prefer nikons, due to their user interface, picture quality, and customer service.

depending on your price range, d50 or d70 or d70s

Dark
Nov 3, 2005, 09:27 PM
Yeah i was looking at the d70s but the RebelXT has amazing reviews. I race motocross, and most of the photographers at the track rock Canon stuff.

Edit: Ahh way to go now you have me second guessing myself lol.

Abstract
Nov 4, 2005, 05:11 AM
You might want to check out this (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=158092) thread for some views on the Rebel and D70s


No no, not THAT thread!! Mas as well recommend THIS (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=158811) thread while you're at it. :p

Anyway, I'm in the same position as you. I love photography, have very little understanding of it (eg: when I look at the numbers on lenses, I have no clue what they're talking about :o ). It will either be the Canon Rebel XT (which I favoured because I have experience with 7 Canon P&S cameras, 4 of which were digital), or Nikon D70s.

I'm on the verge of getting the D70s because the Rebel XT feels like it's "Dell laptop quality" (sorry Rebel owners ;) ), its not as comfortable in your hands, and because the settings are harder to change quickly on a Rebel since some of them are in the menus. In fact, you ALWAYS have to use the menus and LCD to change settings, although Canon provides 4 shortcut arrows to help you get there faster. With the D70s, the build and layout are much better, I think. The quality of the photos is almost the same as well although the Rebel XT has less noise.

The Nikon is built much better AND has a much better kit lens (Canon's is crap). That's what I've learned through listening to the helpful people around here. ;)

Anyway, the Canon is good too. It arguably takes better photos (only because of that little bit of extra noise reduction), but photo quality depends mainly on your skillz as a photographer and your ability to adjust your settings properly. :o It's not a significant difference anyway, nor is it that important as you're not getting a great camera anyway, only a starter DSLR. I say, become skilled and worry about it when you get a better DSLR.

You'll end up a winner no matter which camera you get.

Dark
Nov 4, 2005, 06:38 AM
Woah, thanks for that. How much of a difference is that 2 extra megapixels that the rebel has in comparison to the d70s?

Abstract
Nov 4, 2005, 07:54 AM
Practically zero difference between 8MP and 6MP, and anyone who says otherwise exaggerates a lot. ;) I've seen the proof at some website. To double the number of horizontal and vertical pixels, you'd need to QUADRUPLE the number of MP. So a top-of-the-line 16 MP Canon provides 2x the number pixels along length and width when compared to a 4MP camera. It's a big deal to pros who do large prints, but not for us. Instead of photos that are 3008 x 2000 pixels (D70s), you're gonna get 3423 x 2304 photos from a Rebel XT (numbers taken from sample images).

Lets assume that MPixels is a non-factor. The Canon still provides photos that are less noisy because it uses a CMOS sensor instead of a CCD that every other company uses. It's a big deal when taking certain types of shots (eg: at night if I set the camera to ISO 1600, which is a setting to adjust the chips sensitivity to light), but the noise difference won't be massive.
However, if you didn't notice by holding it, the Rebel feels like cheap plastic poo. It's even prone to fingernail scratches. I know, I know.....WTF!?! It's too light and too small. I'm a guy with average size hands and the Rebel isn't comfortable. :confused:

The Nikon D70s produces more noise, but this is only a problem in certain situations, and the noise difference isn't ginormous because you'll have noise in both images. The kit lens of the D70s is better. The build is clearly better. It's more comfortable in most people's hands. You change the settings by turning those circular dials on the back of the camera and don't need the LCD to do so, and I MUCH prefer this method. The Nikons have a longer battery life.
Too bad it only transfers photos to your computer at USB 1 type speeds, while the Rebel XT and similarly priced competition out there use USB 2.

After thinking about it for a long time and holding both in my hands, I'm going to change my mind and buy the Nikon D70s instead. A camera is only a tool. You still need to USE the camera that you buy, and I'm guessing that the D70s will be better to use. Rebel XT photos will be less noisy at high ISO, but your photo quality will be poor with BOTH cameras if you don't learn about the settings, and that's what is going to make the difference. :)

If you hold the Rebel XT and D70s, and think the Rebel XT is still good, then get the Rebel XT. Many people are happy with it.

kwajo.com
Nov 4, 2005, 08:57 AM
I love the Nikon D70, but it bugs me that people only discuss Canon nad nikon cameras. Pentax, Konica-Minolta and Olympus all make great cameras too. Pentax *ist series uses the exact same CCD sensor as the D70 and has numerous things better (or worse) that Nikon, usually at a lower price, and Pentax has a great lens-making history. Konica-Minolta has a great stabilization system built into their recent models too. so remember, consider all your options, and don't be blind-sided by the CN train

snickelfritz
Nov 5, 2005, 01:48 AM
Canon digi-cams almost universally come closer to analog photo quality than virtually any other brand I've looked at.
Not sure if it's the glass, the sensor or the firmware, but the color, sharpness, noise and detail are all very nicely balanced.
BTW, the Canon 20D is almost certainly the ideal camera to be looking at if you're truly serious about becoming a pro, but can't yet afford a high-end DSLR.

quickie comparison; the Canon trounces the Nikon quite noticeably and is actually comparable to the 20D in terms of image quality.
Nikon D50 (left) Canon 350D (right)
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/NikonD50/Samples/Compared/Studio/d50_iso0200-crops.jpghttp://www.dpreview.com/reviews/NikonD50/Samples/Compared/Studio/350d_iso100-crops.JPG

dogbone
Nov 5, 2005, 03:25 AM
The Nikons have a longer battery life.
Too bad it only transfers photos to your computer at USB 1 type speeds, while the Rebel XT and similarly priced competition out there use USB 2.

This is not an issue because you don't want to be transferring via the camera anyway only in an emergency. You can buy a flash reader for about $15 which will read faster than directly from the camera at usb2.

Dark
Nov 5, 2005, 11:29 AM
Canon digi-cams almost universally come closer to analog photo quality than virtually any other brand I've looked at.
Not sure if it's the glass, the sensor or the firmware, but the color, sharpness, noise and detail are all very nicely balanced.
BTW, the Canon 20D is almost certainly the ideal camera to be looking at if you're truly serious about becoming a pro, but can't yet afford a high-end DSLR.

quickie comparison; the Canon trounces the Nikon quite noticeably and is actually comparable to the 20D in terms of image quality.
Nikon D50 (left) Canon 350D (right)
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/NikonD50/Samples/Compared/Studio/d50_iso0200-crops.jpghttp://www.dpreview.com/reviews/NikonD50/Samples/Compared/Studio/350d_iso100-crops.JPG



Whoah, too bad im trying to compare it to the d70s. But that is a very good comparison you have there. I dont know, i really think im just going to get the Canon. Either way im going to be getting a great camera, and the Canon is smaller, better for me to carry around everywhere.

Abstract
Nov 6, 2005, 07:19 PM
It's a good camera! :)

I went to around 7 camera stores yesterday (no big box stores, just photography stores) in Sydney, and it was pretty interesting.

- 3 sales people recommended getting the D70s because the lenses were better.

- 2 recommended getting the Rebel XT because the lenses were better, and Canon had more lense choices.

- 1 said it doesn't matter which one I buy, but said the Rebel XT was better for me because it was cheaper. He also recommended a Panasonic of some sort with lots of manual controls.

(So that's 3 Rebel XT recommendations, and 3 D70s recommendations total.)

- 1 guy gave me a blind test and showed me 3 photographs taken with 3 different cameras (all cameras that I would be interested in, he said), and asked me to pick which one I liked the most. Coincidentally, I picked the photo taken with the D70s as being the best, the Rebel XT as 2nd, and a particular Olympus model was 3rd. The Rebel XT produced a photo with colours as dull and "washed out" as my rev B's PowerBook's LCD (which has a horrid LCD), and while that photo issue could be fixed using software later, I know I won't do that for every photo I take. I'm too lazy. ;) The OIympus did as well as the D70s in this regard, but I'm quite sure that the colour of the sky isn't the same shade of blue that I saw in the Olympus photo. :p :D

Mike Teezie
Nov 6, 2005, 11:15 PM
Another vote for the Rebel XT. I love mine to death.

BakedBeans
Nov 8, 2005, 02:55 AM
Whoah, too bad im trying to compare it to the d70s.

You would get the same results from the d70 as its the same sensor (80% sure its the same sensor anyway, cant be bothered to look).

The Nikon d70 is slightly bigger and slightly better build quality (it also looks really, really nice), the canon has more features and better picture quality (As shown above). When i first read about the d70 being better build quality i went to check them out side by side, i was expecting the Canon to be awful quality, when it REALLY isn't, its sturdy but light, It feels a lot better with the grip on it, not that much worse then the 20D (although smaller) the D70 is equal in terms of feel to the 20D and a Bit better than the 350D.

In terms of noise and ISO the Canon wins fairly convincingly, although I' sure the nikon fans will say this is false. One thing is that you dont even get ISO100 on the Nikon, thats not a great thing in my opinion.

When people say there is Zero Difference between 6 and 8 megapixels, they are wrong. There isnt a huge difference but there IS a difference

Although every time i here Ken Rockwells hideous comments about 4 and 16 megapixels being roughly the same... i have to chuckle.

Canon and Nikon have some really good lenses, however i feel canon are much better at the long end and equal at the wide end (Better if you want to spend LOTS of money).

EDIT: Although, Nikon have released the D200 that might be worth a look. Either way you get a good camera. I would wait to buy this until you see the results though as they have crammed another 4 million pixels onto the same size sensor (Probably increasing already 'not great' noise levels)



DISCLAIMER: the above recommendation is based on fact but is to be taken as opinion only. If you disagree with this opinion good... Please ignore this and don't bother to quote me.

Abstract
Nov 8, 2005, 03:29 AM
Although every time i here Ken Rockwells hideous comments about 4 and 16 megapixels being roughly the same... i have to chuckle.


Well I didn't LITERALLY mean zero difference, but if you look at the sample images, its just 300 pixels or so in the horizontal and vertical directions. If we were comparing 6MP (D70s) against a 10 or 12MP camera, then sure, that would be something to consider very closely.

And yeah, the 20D is much better quality and much MUCH nicer to hold. I held it when I went to Sydney to look at cameras, which I described earlier. I'd get definitely get THAT one if I were to get a Canon.

You're really not going to lose with either camera. Opinions are split quite evenly as well judging from my experience going to 7 stores in one day, and from this board, and so 50% of photographers are going to disagree with you no matter what.

Anyway, hope you enjoy the Rebel XT. ;) You've gotta post photos you take here so that we can criticize you. ;)

combustible
Nov 9, 2005, 04:39 PM
i just got myself a nikon d50. why? Because i have nikon lenses. If i had Canon lenses i would get a Canon.
I don't think it makes much of a difference to the amateur or semi-pro.
The most important part of the camera is the lens.
The most important part of photography is light.
Before you get a camera, get a book. One that shows you, for example, what an f-stop is and how to use it properly.
If you don't learn the theory behind the basic functions of a d/slr, you'll just shoot in automatic mode, and you might as well get a compact if you want to do that.

ksz
Nov 12, 2005, 07:12 AM
I am quite thrilled with the specs of the Nikon D200. We have yet to see a gallery of images from a production version of the D200 at various ISOs, particularly at 400, 800, and 1600 where it really gets interesting. Nikon went with a CCD at 10.2 MP, developed a new CAM-1000 autofocusing system that might rival the D2X, redeveloped the user-interface with high-quality fonts and menus, and boosted just about every other spec known to mankind. All for $1699. If image quality holds up, this becomes a no-brainer and becomes the digital version of my F100 film camera. Now we wait until December 15...

pubwvj
Nov 21, 2005, 04:32 PM
Sorry to ask a question in your thread, but along the lines of point and shoot not being ideal for learning photography, and an SLR being a big jump, what's in the middle? I'd like something in the middle if they make such a thing. Maybe like a point and shoot but with a manual focus lens, I have no idea.

I just posted some comments on my search for a new camera that may be interesting. In a nut shell, what is good depends a lot on your goals. I want point and shoot size with full manual controls, AA batteries, great sensor and perfect lens. Oh, and not very expensive. Gotta make some compromizes on that list I think... :)

I ended up ordering the FujiFilm FinePix E900 this afternoon and will have by next week so I can offer some feedback then. This is an inbetween camera. The thread below explains my reasoning:

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?p=1925753#post1925753

poolin1243
Nov 21, 2005, 05:33 PM
i vote for a 10d on the canon side...for 700 bucks u can get the body PLUS a battery grip which can be so important....

remember...its usually the indian...and not the arrow...
but on that note...remember to buy good glass!

MattG
Nov 22, 2005, 08:39 AM
I really like my Rebel XT. Like others have said though, regardless of which camera you buy, don't cheap out on the lens. Get a good lens!!!

-hh
Nov 23, 2005, 01:06 PM
...Has anyone had experience with this camera before? If so, how was it and would you recommend it? If not, why and what other camera in the same price range would you reccomend. Any input would really be appreciated.

For someone who's going to be at least a serious amateur or go Pro, when it comes to SLR's, your pragmatic choice is between Nikon or Canon product lines, since these are the two companies with very broad and deep product lines.

Best bet here is to look firsthand at the current body offerings and see what "fits your hand" best, as well as the design of the controls interface...see what you like and what doesn't make sense for you.

It is important to look at both, because what you're really doing isn't buying a camera: you're really buying into a lens system for the next 10-20 years, and if you get into it seriously, you can very quickly have more money invested in your lenses than in your camera bodies.

Personally, I made the jump from an old manual SLR (a Pentax K-1000) to an autofocus SLR around 10 years ago, and I ended up going with Canon over the Nikon, so my lens mount was chosen for me at that time.

Over the past several years, I've slowly bought around $1500 worth of glass for that film camera, so that became a cost factor when I decided to get a dSLR quite recently: it was a question of "Spend X for Canon Y versus Spending (X+$1500) for Nikon Z?".

From this perspective, the technical performance differences between the Canon vs Nikon dSLR's would have to be great enough for me to overcome the value of my existing lens investments...as time goes on and I buy more (and more expensive) lenses, this bar gets raised higher and higher.

So while I'm using Canon ... and will continue to buy Canon in the future ... there's a financial reason underlying why I'm doing so. Fortunately, Canon's arguably as good as Nikon (or better), so its not a hard decision to make.

You're approaching this with a clean slate, so this isn't a constraint for you - - that is, until you buy any system. As such, you'll want to consider the future in your decisions now, with a lot of it being to prevent a brand that might be a dead-end or have limited future flexibility/utility. This is why so many people end up choosing Canon/Nikon.


Getting to specific recommendations, since you already have a non-SLR digitial camera, I'd be inclined to suggest that you might want to actually consider a film 35mm SLR. There's a lot of great stuff that a digital camera can do today because of its immediacy of feedback and ability to easily correct bad exposures and so forth (including your current point-n-shoot), but shooting film may help you for the very reason that it doesn't have these things, so it will force you to be more thoughtful and disciplined about your composition and exposure choices. Think of it as "Tough Love" to really make you learn the craft. :)

Also, the technology on film cameras is quite mature and hasn't changed much over the past few years much: a good body is a good investment that won't depreciate overnight and be completely obsolete in 18 months. This is why the item that's now on the top of my "short list" is an EOS-3 body.

Finally, there's some very good how-to books written by John Shaw. The basic introduction section in each book is pretty much identical, but he covers some really good ground, plus has some great tips for less common subjects (snow, etc). Look through what Amazon has and put a couple of them on your Wish List for Christmas.


-hh

PS: I'm also in New Jersey (northwestern), so if you do end up getting the Rebel XT, let me know...I can loan you some of my lenses if you want to experiment and/or go up to the Water Gap or someplace for a photo shoot.

Danksi
Nov 23, 2005, 01:49 PM
I've a Rebel XT black body and Sigma lens on order at a local camera shop, since most reviews suggest the std canon lens isn't very good. I'll then be able to judge the D70s and Rebel XT together for myself. This combo actually works out slightly cheaper than the standard Canon kit.

I had a play with the D70s last week and it felt very solid, fairly heavy in fact and a little on the large side. Size is a real consideration for me as I want to be able to pack it easily on rides and trips - as far as I can tell from pictures, the Rebel's quite a lot small than the D70s.

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_reviews/d70s/d70s_rebelxt.jpg

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_reviews/d70s/d70s_rebelxt_back.jpg

I had a 35mm Minolta SLR until I gave it to my Dad last year. It took nice pics, but I could never remember the manual settings I'd used for the 'cool' pics. I'm hoping I'll learn quicker with the digital.

Zeke
Nov 26, 2005, 12:38 PM
I have to second the XT...it's a great camera. The D70s is really competing with the 20d so they don't really compare well. In any case, don't order from expresscameras. Do a search on resellerratings for any place you might order from. I wouldn't recommend buying from bestbuy as you'll end up spending much more than you'd like. Order from someplace like buydig.com and then buy a mack warranty to cover the camera if you're concerned about it. I second the getting a good lens...the kit lens is really not very good (not bad and will get you started but you'll be upgrading eventually). I've had a dSLR for 5 months and started with a kit lens...now I have:

Tamron 28-75 XR Di LD
Tamron 19-35
Canon EF 50 1.4

maestro55
Nov 27, 2005, 03:21 PM
I will share a few thoughts, and this will be very biased because I have never used the Nikon D70 or any other Nikon DSLR. I did however get to spend the evening with the Canon Rebel XT last homecoming my ex-yearbook advisor came and asked me to get some photos of her granddaugther. I took various photos while I had use of that camera, the camera was set in its "Program" mode. It has the basic (35-55mm lens I believe) lens kit on it. I have MUCH MUCH to learn about photography, but I really liked the Rebel XT. It did end up taking great photos, a lot better than other cameras that I have used. Too bad I can't afford one myself.

pubwvj
Nov 28, 2005, 05:23 PM
Friday I got a Fuji FinePix E900. I like it. It is a good pocket camera. After I've used it a bit more I'll post comments.

Clix Pix
Nov 28, 2005, 11:33 PM
On the pre-order list at my local camera store for the D200....this has been a long time coming and I hope that none of us will be disappointed! Certainly from everything I've read so far this new camera will be a very nice addition to the Nikon line and will bridge the gap between the D70/D70s and the D2x... I think that there are many of us out here who have loved the D70/D70s and who are now ready to move upward beyond that but who aren't exactly willing to plunk down $$$ for a professional-level camera body. And, as has been noted in this thread, once you get into a DSLR and lenses, you're really not talking about a "camera," you're talking about a "system," and that usually means a substantial investment....therefore many people who have been using the D70/D70s have not decided to jump ship and go to another brand (ie, Canon) because of all the money already put into Nikon lenses. Others, like me, remain loyal to Nikon because we just plain prefer the way Nikon cameras feel and respond and/or are happy with the selection of lenses available....

This isn't to say that Nikon or Canon or any other manufacturer doesn't make mistakes here-and-there: I've got some unused Coolpixes sitting in the camera closet that just never did fulfill my needs (while others --older models -- did).... This past summer when I was in a situation where I wanted to buy a small P&S camera I moved away from the Nikon Coolpix line altogether and went with a Casio. Point here being that while brand loyalty is nice, sometimes you DO have to realize that a particular manufacturer may not be producing what you really need...and so you look elsewhere.

The bottom line here is that choosing a camera and system is a very individual decision based on many factors and is not one to be taken lightly.

OTB

Danksi
Nov 29, 2005, 01:01 AM
On the pre-order list at my local camera store for the D200...

Nice. A ways above my experience. The Rebel XT I have on order will take some growing into personally. I've a friend who loves his D70s, but it's too 'big' and heavy for my needs - which the Rebel XT seems to address well.