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View Full Version : How to break someone's iPod:




TheMonarch
Feb 21, 2006, 10:57 PM
Step 1: Put it on top of your 230 watt subwoofer...

41393
41395

Step 2: :(

This isn't my iPod, but a family member's. I don't know who put it there, but its sorta my fault, since I tried to hide the sub under that little table and I didn't tell my family that:

Subwoofer= giant magnet = Electronics death

The iPod is now dead, with a sad faced icon :(

*Sigh*



2nyRiggz
Feb 21, 2006, 11:01 PM
Thats sad. well time for an upgrade....nice sub, how much time that glass drop off the table with the sub blasting?


Bless

Phat_Pat
Feb 21, 2006, 11:38 PM
so would a sub effect a tv set?

or how about an Xbox 360

i dont know why i never thought of this but its under the TV table....

jkelly888
Feb 21, 2006, 11:39 PM
sucks about the ipod. but thanx for the warning even if it was unintentional

Chaszmyr
Feb 21, 2006, 11:40 PM
so would a sub effect a tv set?

or how about an Xbox 360

i dont know why i never thought of this but its under the TV table....

Any electronic device can receive some adverse effects from a giant magnet (As found a sub), but hard drives are what you need to watch out for in particular. Try keeping your sub at least 3 feet away from anything important.

Phat_Pat
Feb 21, 2006, 11:41 PM
Any electronic device can receive some adverse effects from a giant magnet (As found a sub), but hard drives are what you need to watch out for in particular. Try keeping your sub at least 3 feet away from anything important.
could the sub cause some discoloration in a television?

penguinman
Feb 21, 2006, 11:47 PM
could the sub cause some discoloration in a television?
yep, magnets affect the vaccuum in tv sets.. or the electrons.. i dont know the technical stuff, but magnets (found in all speakers) discolor tv sets and monitors

Phat_Pat
Feb 22, 2006, 12:12 AM
yep, magnets affect the vaccuum in tv sets.. or the electrons.. i dont know the technical stuff, but magnets (found in all speakers) discolor tv sets and monitors
ehhh no wonder.... thanks

now back to that iPod...

atari1356
Feb 22, 2006, 12:17 AM
You can't even reformat/restore it after that?

There have been a couple of times when I've had to gently remind my wife not to set the digital camera/computer equipment near my guitar amp. Luckily nothing has happened yet.

CanadaRAM
Feb 22, 2006, 12:30 AM
yep, magnets affect the vaccuum in tv sets.. or the electrons.. i dont know the technical stuff, but magnets (found in all speakers) discolor tv sets and monitors
OK, for all you whippersnappers, listen up. A CRT (Cathode Ray Tube) as found in most TVs (other than plasmas, LCDs and LCD/DLT projection units) and in tube-style computer monitors (that's what your dad used, son, before there were LCDs) consists of an electron gun, a deflection yoke, a mask or grille, and a phosphor target (the inside of the display glass). The gun shoots electrons toward the target, the deflection yoke (electromagnets) aim the beam of electons by bending it with magnetic deflection, the electrons are masked by the shadow mask (or wire grid, in a Trinitron design) to break them up into discrete pixels, in patterns of red, green and blue circles or stripes. The phosphors on the target glow when hit by the beam.

The deflection yoke scans the electron beam down the screen in a zigzag pattern very rapidly, as the gun fires at the appropriate time for each pixel that is wanted to be lit.

Since magnets are used to aim the electons, what is happening when you bring a powerful magnet near a CRT is that the magnetic field deflects the electron beam in its path to the phosphors: this causes colour change, or fringed patterns of colours on the screen 'coz the electrons are now hitting the wrong pixels.

LCDs are not affected because they use direct transistor control over each pixel on the screen, so they don't rely on magnetic aiming and focussing of a beam.

If you leave a magnet near a CRT too long, the shadow mask can become permanently magnetized itself, and persist in distorting the picture after you have taken away the magnet -- you've seen a "de-gaussing" button or menu control on monitors? That is a de-magnetizing procedure that removes the effects of redsidual magnetization of the internal components. Plus it makes a cool noise and light show whgen you press it. ;)

evilgEEk
Feb 22, 2006, 12:42 AM
...Plus it makes a cool noise and light show whgen you press it. ;)
Definitely the best part. :D

I know all about the adverse effects of magnets and whatnot, but I've had my 5G ipod in a dock on top of my subwoofer many, many times (hooked up to the TV) with nothing happening. I know I'm playing with fire, and eventually I'll get burned, but so far I've had no problems.

My sub is right next to my TV as well, which I really need to move because I have noticed some discoloration of late. Hmmm... where to move it to...??

Now, back to the iPod. Is this something that Apple can restore for you if it's still under warranty or if you have AppleCare? It's just a software restore that I would think any Apple Store could take care of?

redAPPLE
Feb 22, 2006, 01:22 AM
i have this jbl encounter speaker set, which is said to be designed to use with the iPod. it has a sub. does it mean, placing the iPod with the dock would ruin the iPod.

the last week told me to listen to more people in the know.

CanadaRAM
Feb 22, 2006, 01:28 AM
i have this jbl encounter speaker set, which is said to be designed to use with the iPod. it has a sub. does it mean, placing the iPod with the dock would ruin the iPod.

the last week told me to listen to more people in the know.
It depends how powerful thge magnet is in the speaker, whether the speaker is magnetically shielded (many speakers intended for use with computers are) and how far the iPod is from the speaker. Magnetism follows the inverse square rule - move it 2 x further away, and the power of the magnetism is 4 x less. 3 times further, it is 9 x less.

The JBL almost certainly is shielded and has a relatively puny magnet.

TheMonarch
Feb 22, 2006, 10:07 PM
Nope. The iPod is dead. I can't even reformat the thing, my Mac sees nothing, and its out of warranty.

RIP: 20GB 4G B/W HP iPod :(


Man, that sub screwed it up pretty bad too, instead of the commonly heard clicking, its a screetchy whining noise... Sounds like its in pain:(

And to think, what if it was my PowerBook that ended up on that table? :eek:

Flynnstone
Feb 22, 2006, 11:33 PM
yep, magnets affect the vaccuum in tv sets.. or the electrons.. i dont know the technical stuff, but magnets (found in all speakers) discolor tv sets and monitors

yup ... the electrons. Can't really affect vacuum because its nothing really :)

Magnets will affect unshielded CRTs. LCD, DLPs are unaffected.

[edit] CanadaRAM has the details. I didn't read enough.

Also I doubt that the Sub's magnet "injured" the iPod. The vibration more likely.
Magnets don't injure electronics. A magnet "could" flip bits on the platters and screwup the format. But a sub or any speaker I know isn't strong enough to do that.

Flynnstone
Feb 22, 2006, 11:43 PM
Man, that sub screwed it up pretty bad too, instead of the commonly heard clicking, its a screetchy whining noise... Sounds like its in pain:(


Is it the sound of the hard drives read head scraping the magnetic material off of the platters?
If anything, the vibration could have been the problem. Not the magnets.

jadekitty24
Feb 23, 2006, 09:45 AM
Seeing as how the warranty is expired, and you really have nothing to lose, did you try taking it apart? I swear taking things apart and putting them back together again will do wonders. Sometimes.

Eraserhead
Feb 23, 2006, 10:01 AM
if you only use it by USB (not firewire) you could also replace the hard drive inside, you should be able to get a replacement for about $100, the problem is that it then won't work with firewire for some reason...

mrichmon
Feb 23, 2006, 10:29 AM
if you only use it by USB (not firewire) you could also replace the hard drive inside, you should be able to get a replacement for about $100, the problem is that it then won't work with firewire for some reason...

Sorry, but this advice is incorrect. If you replace the hard drive then the iPod will function just as it originally did. The hard drive in the iPod has nothing to do with the interface between the iPod and the computer.

If you have a scratching/scraping noise from the iPod then chances are that you've had a head crash. This could either be caused by the sub-woofer magnets slightly deflecting the drive head. But more likely it has been the vibration from the sub-woofer that has caused a head crash.

Hard drive specifications define a maximum amplitude and frequency for environmental vibrations during drive operation. Placing an iPod that close to a sub-woofer probably exteeded the specifications.

BTW, sub-woofer placement is not that hard. The sounds emitted by a sub-woofer are not directional (unlike other speakers) so you don't need to place a sub in the middle of your main speakers. The sub-woofer just needs to be in the same volume of air as the listener... behind the couch, off in the corner of the room, anywhere it fits. (And away from any electronics you care about. :) )

Eraserhead
Feb 24, 2006, 01:06 PM
Sorry, but this advice is incorrect. If you replace the hard drive then the iPod will function just as it originally did. The hard drive in the iPod has nothing to do with the interface between the iPod and the computer.
You're probably right, however when looking at replacing the hard drive in my 3G iPod, i read in many places that a replacement drive wouldn't work with Firewire when you just get a non Apple Toshiba replacement disk for some reason...

Mord
Feb 24, 2006, 01:46 PM
put the ipod in the freezer for a night then try formating it, i resurected a 4g 40GB ipod like that a while back.

rockthecasbah
Feb 24, 2006, 01:52 PM
RIP: 20GB 4G B/W HP iPod :(
well im not so sad now that it's not an Apple-made iPod, but an HP one. i spit on HP iPods..tee hee :p

Edot
Feb 24, 2006, 02:05 PM
You should definitely put something on that table so that doesn't happen again. If the table is occupied by stuff, people probably wont put stuff on it.

Laser47
Feb 24, 2006, 02:40 PM
well im not so sad now that it's not an Apple-made iPod, but an HP one. i spit on HP iPods..tee hee :p
HP ipods are made by apple. Hp ipods are exactly the same as ipods sold from apple. The only difference is that it has the HP logo on the back.

adk
Feb 25, 2006, 05:15 PM
How old was the subwoofer? I just realized that I have an external HD sitting on my subwoofer, but it's apparently shielded, since my data still exists.

NicP
Feb 26, 2006, 07:04 AM
Are you sure it was the sub that did this? the ipod looks like it would be pretty far away from the magnet, it would have to be a pretty heafty magnet!

macOSX-tastic
Feb 26, 2006, 11:34 AM
what about with regards to magnetic shielding in speakers? dont some subwoofers have them too?

i have creative iTrigues, anyone know?


S

tundra-desert
Mar 6, 2006, 05:15 PM
Any advice on how to permanently render an iPod useless AND keep it eligible for replacement under an extended warranty. The battery is shot and I do not simply want a replacement battery installed by Apple. I prefer that the whole unit is replaced; therefore, the need to make it irreparable; yet not void the service agreement.

Menacing, I know.

Jay42
Mar 6, 2006, 05:25 PM
A quality subwoofer (especially those designed for home theater) are generally well magnetically shielded. Most spec. sheets will specify. This is to prevent interference with other electronics (like iPods ;) ) and prevent other devices from interfering with the sound from the sub. While I certainly cannot say that all sub woofers are shielded, a good deal are, so there is not much need to go crazy here.

As for suggestions on destroying an iPod, I usually throw it down (in attempt to catch it when its falling) on rough city sidewalks. Although my 3G still works to my amazement, I have been able to inflict some good damage to the case.

Mord
Mar 6, 2006, 05:28 PM
without takeing the thing apart no, but if you take it apart you could just buy a replacement battery for 10 bucks.

Kingsly
Mar 6, 2006, 06:57 PM
This may break some post rules... so I am warning everyone: hypothetical situations only!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

In response to the above post asking if there is a way to render an iPod useless:
1) To the best of my knowledge, Apple simply gives you a new iPod if the battery really is a goner. They DO NOT replace batteries.
2) I would imagine if one was to "accidentally" drop their iPod onto a large magnet and in the process of picking it up sprained their back and were unable to straighten up, resulting in leaving for an extended period of time and perhaps rubbing the iPod all over the magnet until all that was left of the HDD platter was a nice coaster for cups (seriously, I use them for my table, they work really well and make good conversation pieces) I would have to assume that, unfortunately, the iPod would be toast and Apple would have no way of knowing what surface the iPod "was gently placed" onto. Purely speculation on my part.
On that note: someone I know fried their iPod plugging it into a car stereo (somehow there was a short in the system and it cooked the logic board via the 1/8" jack) and Apple replaced it when the said person told them "it just stopped working..."
Personally, I love Apple too much to cheat them like that and would probably end up confessing in tears to the bewildered genius bar rep.

Lebowski
Mar 6, 2006, 08:57 PM
first of all, if the sub is designed as a home theater sub, it should be magnetically shielded (as are all speakers used in home theater setups). This is unless you are using a loudspeaker/PA system speakers, which are usually not shielded. I have 3 7.1 systems in my house, and all of them have the subs within a foot or two of largescreen HD sets, and no probs with any of them.

most subs used in home theater systems are 10" or smaller, most home theater in a box subs are around 6.5" which would not have a very powerful magnet at all, and i doubt it would fry your ipod.

I have a sub in my car that has a HUGE magnet, HUGE, as in the freaking sub came in a wooden shipping crate, and weighs over 50lbs, and its sitting within a foot of several different "brain" units for my car audio system, and the gigantic magnet in the sub hasnt caused one issue with the equipment in the trunk.

i am willing to bet that the sub had zero to do with it, just a weird coincidence.

aaron.lee2006
Mar 7, 2006, 07:24 PM
don't feel bad m8. I got my old mini run over by a car:P

TheMonarch
Mar 7, 2006, 08:09 PM
Update. I think this iPod is on the verge of death, ever since it got on top of the sub its shown a sad faced icon. I just let it sit there ever since, and today I checked just for the heck of it, and it was alive! :eek:
Honestly, I don't know what happened, but I'm still weary... I haven't connected it to any computer yet (Initially when found on top of the sub, neither my PowerBook nor my PC would even acknowledge it was there) but I'm afraid to do so.

I checked the manual on my HT and it did mention about magnetic interference. Apparently only the speakers that are designed to be near the TV are magnetically shielded [Left, Center, Right] but warned about the other speakers.

The sub is 10" 230 watt powered weighing in @ little more than 30 pounds bought fall 2005 [As part of a Home Theatre in-a-box]. It is located about 4 feet from my LCD TV. It is hidden under the table for asthetic and space saving reasons.

Now I don't know whats wrong with the iPod. If it was the sub, then why does it work now? Is there any way I can verify if it was or wasn't?

csTYCOON
Mar 7, 2006, 09:09 PM
There are ways to test if the sub wasn't shielded.

Could be coincidence that it happend in that specific spot.:o

Flynnstone
Mar 7, 2006, 09:41 PM
don't feel bad m8. I got my old mini run over by a car:P

Your mileage may vary :D

Sorry about the mini. Sounds like an interesting story.

ChrisBrightwell
Mar 7, 2006, 09:48 PM
How old was the subwoofer? I just realized that I have an external HD sitting on my subwoofer, but it's apparently shielded, since my data still exists.Same here ... I've had several on top of mine for years.

myshoeshurt
Mar 8, 2006, 07:15 PM
This is why I like to be sure all my speakers and subs are magnetically shielded!

Felldownthewell
Mar 8, 2006, 07:35 PM
Oh wow, I just realized that my computer is right up against my sub. I guess my sub just isn't stroung enough to damage my HDD. That is both good and bad at the same time....


Anyway, sorry bout the ipod. I have had many-a-problem with mine, but I can't say I have ever used magnetics to break it. Usually I just break it by...dropping it... or it just breaks because t doesn't like me. :(

Hope the owner gets a nice upgrade!

bense27
Mar 8, 2006, 09:14 PM
have you tried the support documents on apple.com about what to do when the sad face comes up?

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=61771

onthat
Mar 8, 2006, 10:25 PM
I'm just gonna add...My boss just purchased a really big electric pencil sharpener (it'll do any size cut) and put it right next to the computer monitor. Not an hour later, I came back and he was raising hell. Apparently electric pencil sharpeners rely on some sort of electro magnet...CRT monitor is dead.

MacsomJRR
Mar 8, 2006, 10:37 PM
Are you positive that the "magnetics" from the sub destroyed the iPod?