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View Full Version : Spelling Errors! Its LOSE not LOOSE


Music_Producer
Oct 10, 2006, 02:10 AM
I'm generally not anal, but there seems to be a shocking rise in posts that have atrocious spelling errors. I understand when someone makes a typo.. or tries to spell something really hard.. but basic mistakes? Come on! E.g.

"I don't want to loose my job"

What? Is your job tight? Its LOSE.. not LOOSE! LOOSE is the opposite of tight. The correct term is "I don't want to lose my job" I find this mistake almost everywhere.. including front pages of prominent web sites and/or magazines. Its almost as if the dictionary is going to be re-written to include this term for "Loss/Lose"

Next one is .. "Its there cat.. they can do what they want".. its THEIR.. not THERE. Or "Their going to come tomorrow".. its.. um.. "They're or They are"

The funniest one I've seen is "I was not aloud to go in there" ALOUD?!!!! Its allowed. lol. Another one was "I'm so board today"

Anyone else find this surprising?

Surf and Turf
Oct 10, 2006, 02:12 AM
It irks me too. the next time i read lose instead of loose. i will loose it.

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 02:34 AM
I'm generally not anal, but there seems to be a shocking rise in posts that have atrocious spelling errors. I understand when someone makes a typo.. or tries to spell something really hard.. but basic mistakes? Come on! E.g.

"I don't want to loose my job"

What? Is your job tight? It's LOSE.. not LOOSE! LOOSE is the opposite of tight. The correct term is "I don't want to lose my job" I find this mistake almost everywhere.. including front pages of prominent web sites and/or magazines. It's almost as if the dictionary is going to be re-written to include this term for "Loss/Lose"

Next one is .. "It's there cat.. they can do what they want".. it's THEIR.. not THERE. Or "Their going to come tomorrow".. it's.. um.. "They're or They are"

The funniest one I've seen is "I was not aloud to go in there" ALOUD?!!!! It's allowed. lol. Another one was "I'm so board today"

Anyone else find this surprising?

It's = Contraction of "It" and "is"
Its = possessive, example: The dog's tail is wagging. Its tail is wagging.


To answer your question; no, I don't find it surprising.

bousozoku
Oct 10, 2006, 02:38 AM
It's = Contraction of "It" and "is"
Its = possessive, example: The dog's tail is wagging. Its tail is wagging.


To answer your question; no, I don't find it surprising.

Thank you. I'm glad I didn't make any corrections today. :D

Chundles
Oct 10, 2006, 02:44 AM
Words Americans can't spell:

- Definitely
- Ridiculous
- The correct form of "lose/loose"
Ooooh, this is going to get letters...

Don't worry about the British English v. American English spellings, they don't count. It's the above three that really get my goat.

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 02:44 AM
Thank you. I'm glad I didn't make any corrections today. :D

No problem. I'm in "one of those moods" today, so...
I wouldn't mind becoming your Deputy of sorts, really :rolleyes:

Nermal
Oct 10, 2006, 02:50 AM
I've been absolutely astounded in the past by proper printed signs, documentation etc. containing obvious grammatical or spelling errors. A while ago, as we were coming into autumn, a local garden centre had a sign saying something like "get your autum plants here" in big bold letters.

Some fortunately notice their mistakes, I've mentioned in the past about a local motel with a "studio s available" sign out the front - you can clearly see that they've removed the apostrophe from "studio's" :p

mad jew
Oct 10, 2006, 03:01 AM
These threads are always a sign that Apple has gone too long without a new product...

mouchoir
Oct 10, 2006, 03:03 AM
Words Americans can't spell:

- Definitely
- Ridiculous
- The correct form of "lose/loose"
Ooooh, this is going to get letters...

Don't worry about the British English v. American English spellings, they don't count. It's the above three that really get my goat.

You've picked out my worst offender – 'ridiculous'. In fact, that's the first time I've seen it spelt correctly!

It's always 'rediculous' or some other bastardised version! :eek:

It's = Contraction of "It" and "is"
Its = possessive, example: The dog's tail is wagging. Its tail is wagging.


To answer your question; no, I don't find it surprising.

I must admit to messing up that one... :o

Lollypop
Oct 10, 2006, 03:06 AM
These threads are always a sign that Apple has gone too long without a new product...

Agreed, we need some real news ASAP... people on this forum come from all over the world, I personally come from a country with 9 official languages, I admit I do a bangup job of screwing up the 2 I know, cmon people dont LOSE it over a few spelling mistakes :D :cool: ...

dops7107
Oct 10, 2006, 03:09 AM
"Breathe" vs "breath". I reckon a good 50% don't know the difference and is my favourite bugbear.

Nermal
Oct 10, 2006, 03:14 AM
I personally come from a country with 9 official languages

Nine? :eek:

It's bad enough having three here (although I only acknowledge the existence of two of them :p)

mad jew
Oct 10, 2006, 03:16 AM
Yeah, bleating is not a language Nermal.

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 03:23 AM
I must admit to messing up that one... :o

Everyone makes mistakes, don't sweat it. :cool:

I just thought it deserved some mention, considering the nature of the first post.

Nermal
Oct 10, 2006, 03:26 AM
Yeah, bleating is not a language Nermal.

:eek:!

Seriously, our third official language is... wait for it... sign language :rolleyes:

Foggy
Oct 10, 2006, 03:38 AM
I get really irritated by people using "Your" instead of "You're"

bousozoku
Oct 10, 2006, 03:47 AM
No problem. I'm in "one of those moods" today, so...
I wouldn't mind becoming your Deputy of sorts, really :rolleyes:

You're extremely convincing. Even a blind man can see that. :p

On the local t.v. news, I've become accustomed to the reporters saying "There's been some problems." or something like that where they should have used a plural form. Equally the less/fewer (singular/plural) thing bothers me. I suppose it happens outside the U.S.A. but it certainly seems as though there are a lot of imprecise people out there.

Ezekiel
Oct 10, 2006, 03:47 AM
As long as I can read it and get the message then I don't really care much. I find that people that pick out spelling mistakes on a forum (unless it is completely unintelligible) have far to much time and don't leave a life that is remotely full enough.

I would stop worrying about it and do something remotely more productive that starting threads about it, and if you do feel the need to pull people up on it, why not do it in a nice way instead of telling them how annoying they are.

Just my opinion on the matter.

gauchogolfer
Oct 10, 2006, 03:54 AM
For whatever reason my eye is drawn to typos/poor grammar in most things I read: forums, advertisements, magazines, etc. I'm not really sure why, but it seems to jump out at me, and thus can be distracting. Unless I'm in a particularly snarky mood, though, I generally won't point it out to the OP. I hesitate to start those kind of comments for fear of detracting from the ultimate point of MR, which is to have interesting discussions and/or get/give help from the community.

So yes, it is annoying, and I have a hard time ignoring it, but I try not to get too wrapped up in it. Participating in forums on macbidouille.com in my average French helps me have more patience, since many of our members here do not speak English as their native language, and I understand how easy it is to make mistakes in that situation.

Honestly, I get much more annoyed by people who write in 'text-speak' than I do with the occasional loose/lose you're/your its/it's board/bored mistake.

mad jew
Oct 10, 2006, 03:59 AM
Seriously, our third official language is... wait for it... sign language :rolleyes:


Really, you just make it too easy for us. :D

Nermal
Oct 10, 2006, 04:03 AM
Really, you just make it too easy for us. :D

I know, it's a serious problem :(

MacBoobsPro
Oct 10, 2006, 04:09 AM
I think a lot of the erroneous grammar arises from the environment we frequent; sometimes it is much easier and quicker to miss out an apostrophe but still get you're :D message across.

The spelling errors are something different and cannot really be excused.

BTW: There was a lot of 'control + command + d' happening in this post so I didn't make a complete tit of myself. I am usually very good at spelling I guess I'm just getting lazy. :D

Lollypop
Oct 10, 2006, 04:12 AM
As long as I can read it and get the message then I don't really care much. I find that people that pick out spelling mistakes on a forum (unless it is completely unintelligible) have far to much time and don't leave a life that is remotely full enough.

Same here, it might contribute to the decay of the quality of the respective language (english in this case) but as long as I understand what is being said I wont say a thing.

Seriously, our third official language is... wait for it... sign language :rolleyes:

Are you serious? Im to lazy to google right now, but I just hope that my government doesnt hear of it, we might just end up with a 10th language!

Foggy
Oct 10, 2006, 04:18 AM
I think a lot of the erroneous grammar arises from the environment we frequent; sometimes it is much easier and quicker to miss out an apostrophe but still get you're :D message across.


Almost tempted to drive up to Sheffield just to give you a smack round the head ;) :D

MacBoobsPro
Oct 10, 2006, 04:23 AM
Almost tempted to drive up to Sheffield just to give you a smack round the head ;) :D

Your more than welcome to. :D

EDIT: Ooh heres one for you. Should the 'to' at the end of my post be 'to' or 'too'?

a456
Oct 10, 2006, 04:28 AM
I'm generally not anal, but there seems to be a shocking rise in posts that have atrocious spelling errors. I understand when someone makes a typo.. or tries to spell something really hard.. but basic mistakes? Come on! E.g.

"I don't want to loose my job"

What? Is your job tight? Its LOSE.. not LOOSE! LOOSE is the opposite of tight. The correct term is "I don't want to lose my job" I find this mistake almost everywhere.. including front pages of prominent web sites and/or magazines. Its almost as if the dictionary is going to be re-written to include this term for "Loss/Lose"

Next one is .. "Its there cat.. they can do what they want".. its THEIR.. not THERE. Or "Their going to come tomorrow".. its.. um.. "They're or They are"

The funniest one I've seen is "I was not aloud to go in there" ALOUD?!!!! Its allowed. lol. Another one was "I'm so board today"

Anyone else find this surprising?

The immediacy of the web makes more common the use of homonyms - as we absent mindedly type - and perhaps this is the time that the grip of Samuel Johnson and the OED is loosened from our throats as we embrace once again the freedom of earlier eras arguably richer than our own in art and literature. For it may paradoxically help us to understand once again poetry and its use of ambiguity.

MacBoobsPro
Oct 10, 2006, 04:30 AM
The immediacy of the web makes more common the use of homonyms - as we absent mindedly type - and perhaps this is the time that the grip of Samuel Johnson and the OED is loosened from our throats as we embrace once again the freedom of earlier eras arguably richer than our own in art and literature. For it may paradoxically help us to understand once again poetry and its use of ambiguity.

Exactly

Foggy
Oct 10, 2006, 04:40 AM
Your more than welcome to. :D

EDIT: Ooh heres one for you. Should the 'to' at the end of my post be 'to' or 'too'?

*Inserts fingers in ears * LALALA I'm not listening, I'm not listening

(Or should that be fingers in eyes and not reading?)

bousozoku
Oct 10, 2006, 04:44 AM
Your more than welcome to. :D

EDIT: Ooh heres one for you. Should the 'to' at the end of my post be 'to' or 'too'?

It shouldn't be at the end of the post at all. It's a preposition.

a456
Oct 10, 2006, 04:46 AM
It shouldn't be at the end of the post at all. It's a preposition.

And 'your' should be 'you're', it's a contraction of 'you are' :)

a456
Oct 10, 2006, 04:49 AM
Your more than welcome to. :D

EDIT: Ooh heres one for you. Should the 'to' at the end of my post be 'to' or 'too'?

Should read: 'You're more than welcome to come to Sheffield and smack me around the head.'

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 04:51 AM
As long as I can read it and get the message then I don't really care much. I find that people that pick out spelling mistakes on a forum (unless it is completely unintelligible) have far to much time and don't leave a life that is remotely full enough.

I would stop worrying about it and do something remotely more productive that starting threads about it, and if you do feel the need to pull people up on it, why not do it in a nice way instead of telling them how annoying they are.

Just my opinion on the matter.

I generally agree, however:
Common phrases that are butchered also leave me in a state of discomfort. For example:

"leave a life" should be lead a life, unless you plan on dying in the near future (in which case I'm sorry to have corrected you. My sincerest apologies).

I've never heard "pull people up on it", so I can't judge whether or not it is, in fact, an accurate phrase. I'm much more inclined to suggest the following phrase in the hope that people can "read it and get the message" much better: call people out on it. That will be all for now.

The immediacy of the web makes more common the use of homonyms - as we absent mindedly type - and perhaps this is the time that the grip of Samuel Johnson and the OED is loosened from our throats as we embrace once again the freedom of earlier eras arguably richer than our own in art and literature. For it may paradoxically help us to understand once again poetry and its use of ambiguity.

Excellent post :D

Music_Producer
Oct 10, 2006, 04:52 AM
Your more than welcome to. :D

EDIT: Ooh heres one for you. Should the 'to' at the end of my post be 'to' or 'too'?

It's 'You're' or 'You are' .. not 'Your' :p

Everyone makes mistakes, don't sweat it. :cool:

I just thought it deserved some mention, considering the nature of the first post.

That was an error on my part regarding grammar.. not spelling. Yes, I did mean to use it's for 'it is' except for the cat bit. I had a feeling that someone would point it out, but boy you are quick! :)

As long as I can read it and get the message then I don't really care much. I find that people that pick out spelling mistakes on a forum (unless it is completely unintelligible) have far to much time and don't leave a life that is remotely full enough.

Wow, you can't start a thread these days without having Dr. Phil analyze you. I am quite content living my empty life, as I am sure you 'leave' your rich and rewarding life. :rolleyes:


I did not start this thread with the intention of letting people know how annoying they can be when they make spelling mistakes. Its just that, like gauchogolfer commented, it can be distracting. Especially when you see it happen all the time, you think "How do people get basic things wrong?" I don't point out mistakes to people either, I started this thread to see if anyone else notices these things.

If you don't really 'care much' about it.. then you just get worse with your spellings. Like Elron pointed out, now I will keep the 'it's' and 'its' in consideration when I type something. You don't care about it.. so you use words like 'leave' instead of 'live'. I know our ancestors lived on trees.. but come on :)

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 04:54 AM
It's 'You're' or 'You are' .. not 'Your' :p



That was an error on my part regarding grammar.. not spelling. Yes, I did mean to use it's for 'it is' except for the dog bit. I had a feeling that someone would point it out, but boy you are quick! :)



Wow, you can't start a thread these days without having Dr. Phil analyze you. I am quite content living my empty life, as I am sure you 'leave' your rich and rewarding life. :rolleyes:


I did not start this thread with the intention of letting people know how annoying they can be when they make spelling mistakes. It's just that, as gauchogolfer commented, it can be distracting. Especially when you see it happen all the time; you think "How do people get basic things wrong?" I don't point out mistakes to people either, I started this thread to see if anyone else notices these things.

If you don't really 'care much' about it.. then you just get worse with your spellings. Like Elrond pointed out, now I will keep the 'it's' and 'its' in consideration when I type something. You don't care about it.. so you use words like 'leave' instead of 'live'. I know our ancestors lived on trees.. but come on :)

O RLY?

Hahaha, please don't take offense, this thread is making my day! :D :cool: And it's all in good fun, right?

a456
Oct 10, 2006, 04:57 AM
I did not start this thread with the intention of letting people know how annoying they can be when they make spelling mistakes. Its just that, like gauchogolfer commented, it can be distracting. Especially when you see it happen all the time, you think "How do people get basic things wrong?" I don't point out mistakes to people either, I started this thread to see if anyone else notices these things.

If you don't really 'care much' about it.. then you just get worse with your spellings. Like Elron pointed out, now I will keep the 'it's' and 'its' in consideration when I type something. You don't care about it.. so you use words like 'leave' instead of 'live'. I know our ancestors lived on trees.. but come on :)

I think we have to accept that typos happen though, and it is only these that reinforce our own sense of correct spelling and grammar.

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 04:57 AM
I think we have to accept that typos happen though, and it is only these that reinforce our own sense of correct spelling and grammar.

How very astute of you.

MacBoobsPro
Oct 10, 2006, 04:59 AM
It's 'You're' or 'You are' .. not 'Your' :p



I know it is you muppet :D That's what the smiley is for. ;)

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 05:01 AM
Why can't all discussions be like this? :)
I love the banter and the quick wit. And, as far as I know, we haven't offended anyone (with the exception of people who take themselves a bit too seriously). Good job, all of you. Carry on. :D

Music_Producer
Oct 10, 2006, 05:01 AM
O RLY?

Hahaha, please don't take offense, this thread is making my day! :D :cool: And it's all in good fun, right?

Lol.. you're too much. Of course its (drat.. it's) all in good fun! I have completely lost control over my grammar but I'm a little relieved that I can still spell. :eek:

c23roo
Oct 10, 2006, 05:04 AM
Seems like an appropriate place to vent about my biggest pet peeve: reasonably intelligent people who use the magical word 'alot.' I've even seen it as 'allot,' as in, "I like this particular thread allot."

Now, these same people don't seem to use the word 'alittle,' so why is it we feel as though 'alot' is acceptable? The problem with this one is that you never know if it's just a typo (forgot the space) or if the person truly intended to invent a word...

Ahhh (breathing deeply) it's nice to get that out there. You know, I eventually fell in love with a smart woman who persists in using the word 'alot' - and (despite a long-held belief that I could never get past it) now it only bothers me alittle.

- c

Maybe love does truly conquer all...

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 05:04 AM
Lol.. you're too much. Of course its (drat.. it's) all in good fun! I have completely lost control over my grammar but I'm a little relieved that I can still spell. :eek:

Hahaha, I'm glad. :)
I am inclined to agree... my spelling isn't what it used to be.

I should make note of the fact that I am currently writing an History essay, which could explain my current abilities at spotting incorrect usage of the English language. Shame on me; I'm a cheater! :rolleyes:

Edit:
This is a sincere question, is it grammatically correct to use "an" here? I seem to recall reading it in numerous books, but I cannot recall whether this is correct in the modern usage. Anyone?

Music_Producer
Oct 10, 2006, 05:07 AM
I know it is you muppet :D That's what the smiley is for. ;)

I know you knew that (*waits for Elrond to correct my atrocious grammar*) Thats why I put a tongue-stick smiley after my statement too :D

I know you knew
I knew you knew

Lol, that reminds me. I've seen this a lot as well - "You really new her?" :rolleyes:

Music_Producer
Oct 10, 2006, 05:11 AM
Hahaha, I'm glad. :)
I am inclined to agree... my spelling isn't what it used to be.

I should make note of the fact that I am currently writing an History essay, which could explain my current abilities at spotting incorrect usage of the English language. Shame on me; I'm a cheater! :rolleyes:

That reminds me. You know how easy it was in school to write an essay? After IMs and emails, etc.. I find it a little hard to sit down and write a good essay. If my teacher saw what I wrote these days, I have no doubt she would whack me.

Hey, at least I don't say 'Nookyoolar' :D

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 05:11 AM
I know you knew that (*waits for Elrond to correct my atrocious grammar*) Thats why I put a tongue-stick smiley after my statement too :D

I know you knew
I knew you knew

Lol, that reminds me. I've seen this a lot as well - "You really new her?" :rolleyes:

I think that I may just be out of business. You seem to have corrected yourself, already.

And, yes, I've heard that one as well. Terrible.

That reminds me. You know how easy it was in school to write an essay? After IMs and emails, etc.. I find it a little hard to sit down and write a good essay. If my teacher saw what I wrote these days, I have no doubt she would whack me.

Hey, at least I don't say 'Nookyoolar' :D

And it's not only that it used to be much easier in that sense: it simply was easier. Now I find myself constantly distracted by IMs and posting on a particular message-board... :rolleyes:

emotion
Oct 10, 2006, 05:14 AM
Merom not 'memron'.

gauchogolfer
Oct 10, 2006, 05:14 AM
Not to pile on to you here Music_Producer, but you do realize that you misused 'Its' in the thread title, right? Just a bit of irony for you there :). Unless it was intentionally done to get peoples' attention, in which case, bravo.

a456
Oct 10, 2006, 05:15 AM
So, where are the C2D MBPs then?:)

arkitect
Oct 10, 2006, 05:16 AM
Not so much a spelling error but misuse…

Why do people call out: "Here! Here!"

When it is should be "Hear! Hear!"

:confused:

a456
Oct 10, 2006, 05:21 AM
Not so much a spelling error but misuse…

Why do people call out: "Here! Here!"

When it is should be "Hear! Hear!"

:confused:

How do you know the difference when people are calling out?

MacBoobsPro
Oct 10, 2006, 05:24 AM
How do you know the difference when people are calling out?

ROFLMAO :D

arkitect
Oct 10, 2006, 05:27 AM
How do you know the difference when people are calling out?

:) :) I Have very sensitive ears :)

But I guess I should have said: When they "call out" in writing… as people are wont to do on Macrumors.

Example: "We want our 8 Cores in a Conroes today!"
Response: "Here! Here!"…

Music_Producer
Oct 10, 2006, 05:28 AM
Not to pile on to you here Music_Producer, but you do realize that you misused 'Its' in the thread title, right? Just a bit of irony for you there :). Unless it was intentionally done to get peoples' attention, in which case, bravo.

Yes, I realized that once Elrond pointed out the difference between 'its' and 'it's' :o That is incorrect use of grammar though.. *not* a spelling mistake.. hehe!

Lol@ memron for Merom.. I've actually even seen someone type 'Mormon' :eek: For all you know, mac worshipping might really become a ritual!

Music_Producer
Oct 10, 2006, 05:30 AM
:) :) I Have very sensitive ears :)

But I guess I should have said: When they "call out" in writing… as people are wont to do on Macrumors.

Example: "We want our 8 Cores in a Conroes today!"
Response: "Here! Here!"…

That just means they want them 'here' already.. in their local Apple stores :p

And what is 'as people are wont to do on macrumors' ? :D

arkitect
Oct 10, 2006, 05:33 AM
That just means they want them 'here' already.. in their local Apple stores :p

And what is 'as people are wont to do on macrumors' ? :D

Tut! You Philistine! That is "posh" speak that is… ;)

I'll just go away before I dig any deeper… :o

MacBoobsPro
Oct 10, 2006, 05:34 AM
:) :) I Have very sensitive ears :)

But I guess I should have said: When they "call out" in writing… as people are wont to do on Macrumors.

Example: "We want our 8 Cores in a Conroes today!"
Response: "Here! Here!"…


Doesnt it come from showing agreement 'over here' not agreement as in 'hear me agree?'

Chundles
Oct 10, 2006, 05:35 AM
Something I've noticed of late is people using "common" where they mean "come on."

I've seen "I mean, common!" instead of "I mean, come on!" so many times recently and it's really starting to irritate me. They're two different sets of words, you may as well say "I mean elephant bollocks" if you're going to use "common" in place of "come on."

It's just stupid.

And as for all these "I don't care as long as it gets the message across" people, I consider using proper grammar and spelling a mark of courtesy and respect for your fellow person. Even an attempt is good. But for those who constantly type in ridiculous abbreviations, don't structure a sentence or type as though they're having a conversation on MSN or AIM, in my opinion you are showing me disrespect and as such I'm not going to pay much attention to what you have to say.

It really takes little effort to craft a post that is coherent and well thought-out. Fast typing is no excuse for not thinking. Put some effort in.

RedTomato
Oct 10, 2006, 05:35 AM
:eek:!

Seriously, our third official language is... wait for it... sign language :rolleyes:

I know some of the people who campaigned for that. It's not just 'sign language' - it's New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL), which is native to NZ and evolved through several hundred years of the deaf community there.

Calling it 'sign language' is like saying 'we reconise spoken language as a national language'. Yes, but which spoken language?

NZSL is historically related to British Sign Language (BSL) cos of immigration, but it's gone off on its own track and is now a NZ language in its own right.

Are you claiming that NZ should ignore a language that is used by a community across NZ and nowhere else, the only language used fluently by many members of that group, with a rich history of poetry and performance in that language?

Most scandinavian countries reconise their respective native sign languages, the UK has just (sort of) reconised its own BSL as a national language (tho still not with the same status as Welsh, despite being used by far more people than Welsh)

Anyway, returning you to your bickering over spelling - see my next post below.

arkitect
Oct 10, 2006, 05:36 AM
Doesnt it come from showing agreement 'over here' not agreement as in 'hear me agree?'

Actually it originated from Parliament… House of Commons/Lords.

"Hear him! Hear him!" as an encouragement to a speaker making a speech. At least that was what I was taught way back in the Dark Ages. :)

It definitely is not "Here! Here!" ;)

Chundles
Oct 10, 2006, 05:38 AM
I know some of the people who campaigned for that. It's not just 'sign language' - it's New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL), which is native to NZ and evolved through several hundred years of the deaf community there.

Calling it 'sign language' is like saying 'we reconise spoken language as a national language'. Yes, but which spoken language?

NZSL is historically related to British Sign Language (BSL) cos of immigration, but it's gone off on its own track and is now a NZ language in its own right.

Are you claiming that NZ should ignore a language that is used by a community across NZ and nowhere else, the only language used fluently by many members of that group, with a rich history of poetry and performance in that language?

Most scandinavian countries reconise their respective native sign languages, the UK has just (sort of) reconised its own BSL as a national language (tho still not with the same status as Welsh, despite being used by far more people than Welsh)

Anyway, returning you to your bickering over spelling - see my next post below.

New Zealand Sign Language??

You mean instead of signing "Fish" they sign "Fush?"

MacBoobsPro
Oct 10, 2006, 05:39 AM
Actually it originated from Parliament… House of Commons/Lords.

"Hear him! Hear him!" as an encouragement to a speaker making a speech. At least that was what I was taught way back in the Dark Ages. :)

It definitely is not "Here! Here!" ;)

Fair enough. I was born just after the Dark Ages. :)

RedTomato
Oct 10, 2006, 05:40 AM
IIRC some sort of kerkuffle over the word 'Medieval'.

Seems that back when Yahoo was the main search engine / free email host, it was auto-changing instances of the word 'Medieval' to 'Medireview' or something similiar.

Their reasoning seemed to be that as many viruses included the word 'eval' as a programming keyword, removing 'eval' from email attachments hosted by them would sort things out.

Caused no end of fuss with people who had 'eval' as part of their email addresses.

Some dumb students even started taking up the new spellings I think.

bousozoku
Oct 10, 2006, 05:40 AM
And 'your' should be 'you're', it's a contraction of 'you are' :)

I considered that to be intentionally misspelt. Otherwise, I would have mentioned it. ;)

Foggy
Oct 10, 2006, 05:40 AM
New Zealand Sign Language??

You mean instead of signing "Fish" they sign "Fush?"

You owe me a new keyboard - mine is now soaked in coffee :D

Foggy
Oct 10, 2006, 05:42 AM
I considered that to be intentionally misspelt. Otherwise, I would have mentioned it. ;)

I believe it was there to intentionally wind me up :p

Music_Producer
Oct 10, 2006, 05:47 AM
Something I've noticed of late is people using "common" where they mean "come on."
Yes, that irritates the bloody hell out of me.

And as for all these "I don't care as long as it gets the message across" people, I consider using proper grammar and spelling a mark of courtesy and respect for your fellow person. Even an attempt is good. But for those who constantly type in ridiculous abbreviations, don't structure a sentence or type as though they're having a conversation on MSN or AIM, in my opinion you are showing me disrespect and as such I'm not going to pay much attention to what you have to say.

It really takes little effort to craft a post that is coherent and well thought-out. Fast typing is no excuse for not thinking. Put some effort in.

Thank you..finally there are some people in this world who think making an effort to spell right or have a proper conversation is a good thing. I'll make it a point to buy you a beer if I ever visit Australia :)

I've noticed though, that it's mostly Americans who are horrible at spelling (the really basic stuff), and, quite frankly.. they don't care if anyone corrects them.

Queso
Oct 10, 2006, 05:51 AM
I personally come from a country with 9 official languages.
9? It was 11 when I lived there. Which two lost out?

iMeowbot
Oct 10, 2006, 05:56 AM
How do you know the difference when people are calling out?
I guess it's a mute point (and where in the world did that one come from? Are there places where moot and mute are pronounced the same?) :p

Scarlet Fever
Oct 10, 2006, 06:03 AM
i dont mind leaving out apostrophes in words (as you can tell by the second word in my post :p). The thing which irritates me most is when people use MSN speak in the forums, like "How do u do dis?" GRR!!! TAKE THE TIME TO WRITE YOU INSTEAD OF U!

people writing iPods as I-PODS, and similar with I-MAC, I-BOOK is annoying as well.

ahh i feel much better now :D

EDIT: For a thread about something as basic as improper grammar (not grammer :cool: ), it is amazingly popular. Looks like almost half the threads on the ForumSpy are replies to this thread!

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 06:19 AM
EDIT: For a thread about something as basic as improper grammar (not grammer :cool: ), it is amazingly popular. Looks like almost half the threads on the ForumSpy are replies to this thread!

I really feel like I've contributed, then. First time I can recall getting the first (not original) post in. Hooray for me!

Glen Quagmire
Oct 10, 2006, 06:38 AM
The thing that annoys me the most is incorrect use of apostrophes. People use apostrophes in the most inappropriate places. I'm not just talking about confusing "it's" and "its", but when people use a plural, especially a plural that's the name of something (like iMac or iPod), for reasons I just cannot fathom, they think it's necessary to insert an apostrophe.

So you get stuff like this:

"When are the new iMac's coming out?"
"How loud are Mac Pro's?"
"I own six iPod's."

I must have missed the school lesson where people were taught that using apostrophes to denote plurals was correct. Oh wait, it's not correct. SO WHY DO YOU DO IT?

Correct use of the apostrophe is not a difficult thing to master.

In respect of spelling/grammar/punctuation mistakes in general, unless you have a good excuse (dyslexia or you are a non-native English speaker), such mistakes just make me think that you're not terribly intelligent and are careless. Your posts here are all people have to go on when forming an opinion of you. If your posts are full of elementary spelling mistakes, rampant apostrophe's [sic] and so on, it paints a very poor picture of you.

Squire
Oct 10, 2006, 07:04 AM
How do you know the difference when people are calling out?

Yup. That one got an audible chuckle out me, too. Nice one.

Props to the starter here. The "loose" vs. "lose" issue is one that has been driving me nuts for years.

Some interesting sites:
ending a sentence with a preposition (http://www.ojohaven.com/fun/broken.rules.html)
apostrophes with plurals (http://englishplus.com/grammar/00000135.htm)

-Squire

Queso
Oct 10, 2006, 07:09 AM
Correct use of the apostrophe is not a difficult thing to master.
It is surprisingly difficult when you were taught it incorrectly in the first place, as I was. I'm always messing up on the it's vs. its thing. :(

But I have no such excuse for starting sentences with And all the time. That's 100% my fault.

calculus
Oct 10, 2006, 07:17 AM
rampant apostrophe's [sic]
Ah, that well known heraldic symbol the apostrophe rampant...

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 07:18 AM
In respect to spelling/grammar/punctuation mistakes in general, unless you have a good excuse (dyslexia or you are a non-native English speaker), such mistakes just make me think that you're not terribly intelligent and are careless. Your posts here are all people have to go on when forming an opinion of you. If your posts are full of elementary spelling mistakes, rampant apostrophe's [sic] and so on, it paints a very poor picture of you.

Or, better In regards to, or with respect to.

iGav
Oct 10, 2006, 07:30 AM
Poor grammar and spelling is unarguably less annoying than people whom feel the need to point out others errors in threads. :rolleyes:

calculus
Oct 10, 2006, 07:33 AM
Poor grammar and spelling is unarguably less annoying than people whom feel the need to point out others errors in threads. :rolleyes:
Is this sentence a test for us?:D

Music_Producer
Oct 10, 2006, 07:34 AM
Poor grammar and spelling is unarguably less annoying than people whom feel the need to point out others errors in threads. :rolleyes:

Oh God, here we go again..

Brize
Oct 10, 2006, 07:46 AM
Or, better In regards to, or with respect to.

Unless you're British, in which case 'in respect of' and 'with regard to' are preferred.

Queso
Oct 10, 2006, 07:47 AM
Poor grammar and spelling is unarguably less annoying than people whom feel the need to point out others errors in threads. :rolleyes:
Hence it's now been moved to a thread of its own. :)

P.S. How was that on the apostrophe front?

skunk
Oct 10, 2006, 07:49 AM
Hence it's now been moved to a thread of its own. :)

P.S. How was that on the apostrophe front?Better than iGav's, which should of course have read who and others'...:rolleyes:

OzMo
Oct 10, 2006, 08:09 AM
You mean instead of signing "Fish" they sign "Fush?"
And "chups". The mind boggles at how they sign numbers beyond 5 :eek:

jdechko
Oct 10, 2006, 09:35 AM
Your more than welcome to. :D

EDIT: Ooh heres one for you. Should the 'to' at the end of my post be 'to' or 'too'?

You guys missed one. It should be "here's" not "heres". "Here's" is a contraction for "here is".

:)

I'd agree, though, that grammar and spelling are often neglected in schools. I think that IM and the internet in general have cause grammar and spelling rules to be put off further, based on the lack of proper grammar and spelling. I try to do my best to keep the grammar rules here on MR, but sometimes, a mistake will slip.

obeygiant
Oct 10, 2006, 09:38 AM
i wouldnt want to lose my loose girlfriend.

iGav
Oct 10, 2006, 09:47 AM
Better than iGav's, which should of course have read who and others'...:rolleyes:

Teehee.

But really people, it's a forum for f**ks sake... not an english class *sighs*. These threads crop up every so often, and I just think... how ********* anal do you have to be, to feel the need to correct someone on a forum :rolleyes: I can just imagine how every little missed placed . , ' " etc must feel like a long, slow ****** up the arse, I dread to think of the frenzy they get worked in to when they receive a text message. :p

Ezekiel
Oct 10, 2006, 09:57 AM
Wow, you can't start a thread these days without having Dr. Phil analyze you. I am quite content living my empty life, as I am sure you 'leave' your rich and rewarding life. :rolleyes:




Awww, picking up on a typo. You are definitely "better" than me now, just as you are "better" than people who put loose in place of lose. You must feel you have really accomplished something in life by being able to belittle people because of the odd typographical error. You are also a hypocrite for picking up on others spelling or grammar, when your own is average.

I rate misspelling right up there with famine and war in the middle east :rolleyes: . MY point being is that if you get this worked up over a mistake on the internet, then surely you lead life at an incredibly fulfilled level? everything must be perfect in your life for you even to care enough to make a stand against these horrific human beings that might make a mistake every now and then.

Personally, if I write an article for print or maybe some other work that requires spelling and grammar to be correct, then I would take the time to get it 100% perfect, until then 95% will do, especially when it is a forum on the internet.

MY advice is to just chill out about it, its a forum not the national press or a application for employment, don't let it "really irritate the hell out of you".

bousozoku
Oct 10, 2006, 10:09 AM
Yes, I realized that once Elrond pointed out the difference between 'its' and 'it's' :o That is incorrect use of grammar though.. *not* a spelling mistake.. hehe!

Lol@ memron for Merom.. I've actually even seen someone type 'Mormon' :eek: For all you know, mac worshipping might really become a ritual!

I half expected that someone who correct your its/it's mistake with its', as I've seen more than a few do. Where they got that, I'm not sure.

I believe it was there to intentionally wind me up :p

It would have been too late by that time. You seemed quite wound up already. ;)

2nyRiggz
Oct 10, 2006, 10:38 AM
The grammar threads again:rolleyes:

Make it a sticky so we don't forget "MR is the Grammar nazi headquarters"


Bless

4np
Oct 10, 2006, 10:40 AM
I'm generally not anal, but there seems to be a shocking rise in posts that have atrocious spelling errors. I understand when someone makes a typo.. or tries to spell something really hard.. but basic mistakes? Come on! E.g.

"I don't want to loose my job"

What? Is your job tight? Its LOSE.. not LOOSE! LOOSE is the opposite of tight. The correct term is "I don't want to lose my job" I find this mistake almost everywhere.. including front pages of prominent web sites and/or magazines. Its almost as if the dictionary is going to be re-written to include this term for "Loss/Lose"

Next one is .. "Its there cat.. they can do what they want".. its THEIR.. not THERE. Or "Their going to come tomorrow".. its.. um.. "They're or They are"

The funniest one I've seen is "I was not aloud to go in there" ALOUD?!!!! Its allowed. lol. Another one was "I'm so board today"

Anyone else find this surprising?

I have actually looked these spelling errors up (Loose my job (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=108594), Aloud to (http://www.google.nl/search?hl=nl&q=site%3Aforums.macrumors.com+%22aloud+to%22&btnG=Zoeken&meta=), there cat (can't find it)).

I actually thought these mistakes could have been made by non-native speakers, however it turned out that most of these people actually are native speakers ;)

®îçhå®?
Oct 10, 2006, 10:45 AM
Not surprising as people dont really care.
We are geeky and like science not english.

deputy_doofy
Oct 10, 2006, 10:51 AM
I'm generally not anal, but there seems to be a shocking rise in posts that have atrocious spelling errors. I understand when someone makes a typo.. or tries to spell something really hard.. but basic mistakes? Come on! E.g.

"I don't want to loose my job"

What? Is your job tight? Its LOSE.. not LOOSE! LOOSE is the opposite of tight. The correct term is "I don't want to lose my job" I find this mistake almost everywhere.. including front pages of prominent web sites and/or magazines. Its almost as if the dictionary is going to be re-written to include this term for "Loss/Lose"

Next one is .. "Its there cat.. they can do what they want".. its THEIR.. not THERE. Or "Their going to come tomorrow".. its.. um.. "They're or They are"

The funniest one I've seen is "I was not aloud to go in there" ALOUD?!!!! Its allowed. lol. Another one was "I'm so board today"

Anyone else find this surprising?

These kind of things irk the #### out of me. Then, when you point it out, people say, "Well, it's only a message board. Who cares?"

It seems to me, anyway, that one SHOULD care how they present themselves in public, regardless (catch that? NOT IRregardless :p) of anonymity.

Typos are one thing. We all make those mistakes, but for godsakes, don't use a word if you're (SEE? Not your :p) going to use the WRONG word altogether and not know the problem.

It's vs. its
their vs. there vs. they're
where vs. were vs. we're vs. wear
than vs. then
loose vs. lose

The list goes on and on and on...

Brize
Oct 10, 2006, 10:56 AM
Not surprising as people dont really care.
We are geeky and like science not english.

We? Speak for yourself. :rolleyes:

And since when were science and English mutually exclusive?

xov
Oct 10, 2006, 10:58 AM
Hahaha, I'm glad. :)
I should make note of the fact that I am currently writing an History essay ...

This is a sincere question, is it grammatically correct to use "an" here? I seem to recall reading it in numerous books, but I cannot recall whether this is correct in the modern usage. Anyone?
One usually sees an used with historical rather than history. Since the accent is not on the first syllable, people tend to think an historical sounds more correct than a historical. I remember a cover of Time Magazine (I think) with An Historical (something) in big bold letters.

However, the rule is that an is used before words that begin with a vowel sound. Therefore, correct usage is
a history
a historical
an honor
an unusual
a usual

RedTomato
Oct 10, 2006, 11:22 AM
Not surprising as people dont really care.
We are geeky and like science not english.

I'm a geek.

I work as chief technology officer for a small company.

I also try to use good english or at least be aware of my errors. I've sold my fiction writing for thousands of pounds. (i.e. good but don't give up on the day job)

I also lecture on art at an art gallery, and as an artist, have won thousands of pounds of funding (again, good but don't give up on the day job)

I built my own RAID5 server, can read (but not write) some short programs in C++, am comfortable in Terminal, and other minor geeky things.

Don't give me that bullcrap about 'two cultures'. I am pretty sure that both Steve Jobs and the Woz have better english (when they try) than I or many people here do.

Even ubergeek Linus Torvalds has a lovely way with words and grammar, and English is nowhere near his first language.

Ezekiel
Oct 10, 2006, 11:27 AM
I'm a geek.

I work as chief technology officer for a small company.

I also try to use good english or at least be aware of my errors. I've sold my fiction writing for thousands of pounds. (i.e. good but don't give up on the day job)

I also lecture on art at an art gallery, and as an artist, have won thousands of pounds of funding (again, good but don't give up on the day job)

I built my own RAID5 server, can read (but not write) some short programs in C++, am comfortable in Terminal, and other minor geeky things.
Don't give me that bullcrap about 'two cultures'. I am pretty sure that both Steve Jobs and the Woz have better english (when they try) than I or many people here do.

Even ubergeek Linus Torvalds has a lovely way with words and grammar, and English is nowhere near his first language.

Having good English and being word perfect 100% of the time on a forum that is used for pleasure are completely different things though.

This is recreation, this isn't a job, an exam or anything vitally important enough to get worked up about.

skunk
Oct 10, 2006, 11:49 AM
However, the rule is that an is used before words that begin with a vowel sound. Therefore, correct usage is
a history
a historical
an honor
an unusual
a usualWhat happens if you drop your aitches?

Queso
Oct 10, 2006, 11:54 AM
What happens if you drop your aitches?
A haitch should nevvah be dropped tho innit?

Chundles
Oct 10, 2006, 11:54 AM
What happens if you drop your aitches?

'Enry 'Iggins 'its you.

MACDRIVE
Oct 10, 2006, 11:56 AM
It's PowerBook, MacBook, and MacBook Pro. Get it right people! http://deephousepage.com/smilies/tantrum.gif

skunk
Oct 10, 2006, 11:59 AM
It's PowerBook, MacBook, and MacBook Pro. Get it right people! http://deephousepage.com/smilies/tantrum.gifThen why isn't it MacDrive???

MACDRIVE
Oct 10, 2006, 12:05 PM
Then why isn't it MacDrive???

Aaaaahhhh!!!! http://deephousepage.com/smilies/banghead.gif

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 12:10 PM
One usually sees an used with historical rather than history. Since the accent is not on the first syllable, people tend to think an historical sounds more correct than a historical. I remember a cover of Time Magazine (I think) with An Historical (something) in big bold letters.

However, the rule is that an is used before words that begin with a vowel sound. Therefore, correct usage is
a history
a historical
an honor
an unusual
a usual

Cool, thanks. :) Learned something.

That's my problem with people getting all tetchy over this sort of thread: it shouldn't be considered as a horrible thing (which they do), because it's a way for people to improve their language skills and present themselves as informed and educated individuals. Pointing our, sarcastically, that this is as high on your priority list as famine and war merely proves the point that you are unwilling to correct your grammar and present yourself in such a way that people can take you seriously. Let alone the fact that such a comment is ridiculous beyond belief: I think I speak for the majority here when I say that we don't intend to place grammar at the height of such a list. We just want to improve the little things over which we actually have this power.

It certainly is ironic, though, that the people so quick to point out the uselessness of our endeavors (American spelling, yes) are apparently not able to correct their own grammar.

And on that note:
Poor grammar and spelling is unarguably less annoying than people whom feel the need to point out others errors in threads.

Sorry, iGav, it won't happen again. :cool: (Though I see 3 mistakes.)

Glen Quagmire
Oct 10, 2006, 01:11 PM
But really people, it's a forum for f**ks sake... not an english class *sighs*. These threads crop up every so often, and I just think... how ********* anal do you have to be, to feel the need to correct someone on a forum :rolleyes: I can just imagine how every little missed placed . , ' " etc must feel like a long, slow ****** up the arse, I dread to think of the frenzy they get worked in to when they receive a text message. :p

How very eloquent. Swear words, sexual content. A post to which the rest of us can only aspire. Pathetic. Oh, and it's "misplaced", not "miss placed". Is that all you have to offer? Petty insults?

Writing standards matter no matter what the medium - be it email, in a letter or wherever. If a person can't be bothered to ensure that their post (or whatever) is spelt correctly, then why should I bother reading it? Why should I waste my time trying to decipher a load of poorly-punctuated nonsense? I have better things to do with my time, to be frank, especially if the communication in question is as appalling as that quoted at the top of this post.

The English language, especially in its written form, can be wonderfully expressive and lyrical. Quite why some people seem to feel the need to wreck it due to poor education or simply not caring (by far a worse crime) is beyond me. I am not singling you out, iGav, but you do provide a convenient example of what riles me.

Still, ignorance is bliss and all that. Continue on your merry way.

xov
Oct 10, 2006, 01:12 PM
What happens if you drop your aitches?
An 'ooligan in an 'at was riding an 'orse ... :D

Nermal
Oct 10, 2006, 01:33 PM
I know some of the people who campaigned for that. It's not just 'sign language' - it's New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL), which is native to NZ and evolved through several hundred years of the deaf community there.

I didn't mean to offend anyone, but I believed that sign language isn't really a language. The OED defines a language as "the method of human communication, either spoken or written, consisting of the use of words in a structured and conventional way."

However, I'm not trying to start an argument.

Jaffa Cake
Oct 10, 2006, 01:33 PM
What happens if you drop your aitches?You develop a glottal stop to compensate. At least, that's what we do around my way and it's always worked fine for me.

Jaffa Cake
Oct 10, 2006, 01:42 PM
The OED defines a language as "the method of human communication, either spoken or written, consisting of the use of words in a structured and conventional way."Language can also be defined as 'any nonverbal method of expression or communication', which in my book at least works to describe sign language.

Nermal
Oct 10, 2006, 01:44 PM
Language can also be defined as 'any nonverbal method of expression or communication', which in my book at least works to describe sign language.

It certainly does. I will accept that I was mistaken.

wimic
Oct 10, 2006, 03:15 PM
I'm generally not anal, but there seems to be a shocking rise in posts that have atrocious spelling errors. I understand when someone makes a typo.. or tries to spell something really hard.. but basic mistakes? Come on! E.g.

"I don't want to loose my job"

What? Is your job tight? Its LOSE.. not LOOSE! LOOSE is the opposite of tight. The correct term is "I don't want to lose my job" I find this mistake almost everywhere.. including front pages of prominent web sites and/or magazines. Its almost as if the dictionary is going to be re-written to include this term for "Loss/Lose"

Next one is .. "Its there cat.. they can do what they want".. its THEIR.. not THERE. Or "Their going to come tomorrow".. its.. um.. "They're or They are"

The funniest one I've seen is "I was not aloud to go in there" ALOUD?!!!! Its allowed. lol. Another one was "I'm so board today"

Anyone else find this surprising?


This is, quite possibly, one of my biggest pet peeves when it comes to spelling errors.... I've argued until I was blue in the face with people about this before. :mad:

i think the trouble is that words like OOZE have two Os, therefore making it seem only logical that LOOSE would be pronounced L-OOZE... which, in fact, is spelled lose..

The English language is both a beautiful and confusing thing :rolleyes:

vniow
Oct 10, 2006, 03:50 PM
Merom not 'memron'.


Its actually spelled 'Moron'. Just like this thread.

thedude110
Oct 10, 2006, 03:51 PM
For it may paradoxically help us to understand once again poetry and its use of ambiguity.

Link? (http://www.amazon.com/Necessary-Angel-Reality-Imagination-Vintage/dp/0394702786/sr=8-1/qid=1160513354/ref=pd_bbs_1/104-7430308-7711105?ie=UTF8)

Am a bit starved for poetry talk at the moment and your picking at ambiguity has piqued my interest.

Elrond39
Oct 10, 2006, 03:58 PM
How very eloquent. Swear words, sexual content. A post to which the rest of us can only aspire. Pathetic. Oh, and it's "misplaced", not "miss placed". Is that all you have to offer? Petty insults?

Writing standards matter no matter what the medium - be it email, in a letter or wherever. If a person can't be bothered to ensure that their post (or whatever) is spelt correctly, then why should I bother reading it? Why should I waste my time trying to decipher a load of poorly-punctuated nonsense? I have better things to do with my time, to be frank, especially if the communication in question is as appalling as that quoted at the top of this post.

The English language, especially in its written form, can be wonderfully expressive and lyrical. Quite why some people seem to feel the need to wreck it due to poor education or simply not caring (by far a worse crime) is beyond me. I am not singling you out, iGav, but you do provide a convenient example of what riles me.

Still, ignorance is bliss and all that. Continue on your merry way.

Oh, my! English used in its proper form! And a well-reasoned argument as well! Good job! :p :D

Its actually spelled 'Moron'. Just like this thread.

But isn't a thread an inanimate object? And can such a characteristic be attributed to it in light of this fact?

Slowly, but surely, this thread is moving toward poetry and philosophy.

Cube54
Oct 10, 2006, 04:50 PM
Am I the first to post this? I didn't read any posts that covered the topic.

The 2 most horrible words in the English language when used together. Which seems to be in every other sentence, especially in America.

-> you know

Well, no I didn't

KingYaba
Oct 10, 2006, 04:56 PM
Do people know how to press command shift colon on their keyboards? That is, if you type posts using Safari or TextEdit?

gauchogolfer
Oct 10, 2006, 04:58 PM
Do people know how to press command shift colon on their keyboards? That is, if you type posts using Safari or TextEdit?

Why go to that trouble? I prefer to enable 'check spelling as you type' to keep a constant eye on things.

mkrishnan
Oct 10, 2006, 05:02 PM
Do people know how to press command shift colon on their keyboards? That is, if you type posts using Safari or TextEdit?

I didn't. But then I also prefer in-line checking. It's the single best thing about Safari, in my book, and *the* thing I miss when I am using Firefox. :o Of course if you go and add "Memron" and "degregate" and so on to it, you're still SOL! :D

KingYaba
Oct 10, 2006, 05:03 PM
Trouble? :D You are only pressing three keys!

MultiM
Oct 10, 2006, 05:28 PM
thanx, i achually staid late at werk to read this hole discushen...

Very funny!

Cube54
Oct 10, 2006, 05:29 PM
This is, quite possibly, one of my biggest pet peeves when it comes to spelling errors.... I've argued until I was blue in the face with people about this before. :mad:

i think the trouble is that words like OOZE have two Os, therefore making it seem only logical that LOOSE would be pronounced L-OOZE... which, in fact, is spelled lose..

The English language is both a beautiful and confusing thing :rolleyes:

Trust me, I'm originally from Calgary :cool:

Calgary women are loose and the Calgary Flames will lose! :D

bousozoku
Oct 10, 2006, 06:03 PM
Am I the first to post this? I didn't read any posts that covered the topic.

The 2 most horrible words in the English language when used together, which seems to be in every other sentence, especially in America.

-> you know

Well, no I didn't.

You didn't do a few things. ;)

Cube54
Oct 10, 2006, 06:12 PM
You didn't do a few things. ;)


, which

Darn Mac keyboard every time I go to type the word witch I drop the comma and forget the w. Just being polite I guess.

bousozoku
Oct 10, 2006, 06:23 PM
, which

Darn Mac keyboard every time I go to type the word witch I drop the comma and forget the w. Just being polite I guess.

Are you giving me another opportunity here? :D That's quite generous of you.

Cube54
Oct 10, 2006, 06:27 PM
Are you giving me another opportunity here? :D That's quite generous of you.

Your Call :D Find out You know

MACDRIVE
Oct 10, 2006, 06:52 PM
How about probably?

If you're from a trailer park in West Virginia, you would write it as prolly.

Irritates me to no end. :mad:

c23roo
Oct 10, 2006, 07:04 PM
What I really appreciate is the wonderful reaction one receives when one attempts (however humbly presented) to correct spelling/grammatical errors that others have made. In attempting to clean up the sloppiness, people take great offense when you wish that, say, an official document representing your company/school/hospital/organization is at least written in reasonably proper language and grammar.

I can forgive much of the postings/text messages/email content - as people are not as likely to proofread (which is a different thing from spell-checking - many don't know this).

I don't mind so much having the sarcastic - 'Oh, thanks, English major!' - as I usually reply, "No, English speaker."

- c

n8236
Oct 10, 2006, 07:14 PM
I need to lern how to reed :)

840quadra
Oct 10, 2006, 07:16 PM
This thread is Annyoung!

bousozoku
Oct 10, 2006, 07:35 PM
This thread is Annyoung!

Are you trying to write Korean? :D

mad jew
Oct 10, 2006, 07:54 PM
Or are you just randomly naming threads after dead film stars (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polly_Ann_Young)? Can I name this one Rowena Wallace (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=241652)?

Doctor Q
Oct 10, 2006, 07:55 PM
It's worth pointing out that the forum rules state:Corrections. There is no need to point out another poster's spelling or grammatical errors unless you think it is causing confusion. Remember that not all members are native English speakers. Communication, not correctness, is our goal.It's listed under "Minor rules", so it's not a big deal, but we do discourage people from pointing out specific mistakes by others unless they really affect the discussion. (I should have typed "effect the discussion" to see if anybody would notice, but I just couldn't stand to.)

Complaining about the general lack of good spelling habits, in the forums or in the real world, is fine.

mad jew
Oct 10, 2006, 08:02 PM
I like to use correct spelling and grammar when possible. I've learnt a few tips from this thread and I don't mind being correct out there. *Points to rest of MacRumors*

I understand where this rule is coming from, but if I'm making a consistent error, I'd like to know about it.

jsw
Oct 10, 2006, 08:03 PM
I like to use correct spelling and grammar when possible. I've learnt a few tips from this thread and I don't mind being correct out there. *Points to rest of MacRumors*

I understand where this rule is coming from, but if I'm making a consistent error, I'd like to know about it.
I believe you meant "corrected" above. It's hard to be certain, though, because you're so often correct in your posts. ;)

mad jew
Oct 10, 2006, 08:09 PM
*Sips morning coffee*


Thanks mate. :D

skoker
Oct 10, 2006, 08:14 PM
You people need a good dose of Leno™

http://www.nbc.com/nbc/The_Tonight_Show_with_Jay_Leno/headlines/

Squire
Oct 10, 2006, 09:44 PM
Are you trying to write Korean? :D

I got it. ;)

-Squire

bousozoku
Oct 10, 2006, 10:00 PM
I got it. ;)

-Squire

That makes two. :D Maybe, we should have a Korean club...or not.

angelneo
Oct 10, 2006, 10:45 PM
This thread is Annyoung!
Annyong! (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0367279/quotes)
Annyong? (http://www.tkrs.ca/framepages/Korea%20Info%20Frame/phrases.htm)

MrSmith
Oct 11, 2006, 04:50 AM
~Who did you give it to?~

I think people who put the preposition at the end and/or use 'who' instead of 'whom' as the interrogative or object are lower than a rhino's testicles.

:D

Seriously...people who type i instead of I as in 'i am' annoys me. They wouldn't dream of doing that when writing, so why do it with a keyboard? Just too lazy. On a global scale it's not that important, but most people have standards in many aspects of their lives. For example, who here would go to work knowing they had holes in their (under)pants? Apart from the three that should be there, to preempt any wise guys. Could make it a poll :D

skunk
Oct 11, 2006, 05:30 AM
The English language, especially in its written form, can be wonderfully expressive and lyrical. Quite why some people seem to feel the need to wreck it due to poor education or simply not caring (by far a worse crime) is beyond me. I am not singling you out, iGav, but you do provide a convenient example of what riles me.

Still, ignorance is bliss and all that. Continue on your merry way.Spelling is one thing - and not so very important, in my opinion, as long as the meaning comes across. Some people can spell, some find it more difficult. What is annoying is when people use the wrong word.

MrSmith
Oct 11, 2006, 05:48 AM
What is annoying is when people use the wrong word.

"Banana. Think different."

Are ya pissed? :)

Mr Skills
Oct 11, 2006, 05:57 AM
But I have no such excuse for starting sentences with And all the time. That's 100% my fault.

I consider myself a grammar nut but I am still happy to start a sentence with "and" if I consider it stylistically good. Grammar should be about helping you express yourself *more*, not limiting expression. :)

.


.

Elrond39
Oct 11, 2006, 06:18 AM
I consider myself a grammar nut but I am still happy to start a sentence with "and" if I consider it stylistically good.

Stylistically good? Are you sure about that one? :cool:

Mr Skills
Oct 11, 2006, 06:53 AM
Stylistically good? Are you sure about that one? :cool:

Is that a criticism of the phrase "stylistically good", or disbelief that starting a sentence with "and" or "but" could ever have style?

.


.

Elrond39
Oct 11, 2006, 07:08 AM
Is that a criticism of the phrase "stylistically good", or disbelief that starting a sentence with "and" or "but" could ever have style?

Neither, really. I just felt that the phrase "stylistically good" seemed awkward. I think it is correct, linguistically, but it doesn't feel right. That's the only reason.

MrSmith
Oct 11, 2006, 07:31 AM
Neither, really. I just felt that the phrase "stylistically good" seemed awkward. I think it is correct, linguistically, but it doesn't feel right. That's the only reason.

Adverb + adjective = kosher, in my book.

Maybe because 'good' is a word like 'nice' that has such a broad meaning it sounds almost uneducated to use it. As if one doesn't have the intelligence to think of a suitable word and so uses it as a filler. Like my mother's favourite: 'thingy'. Not saying she's unintelligent: she had me :D :cool:

revenuee
Oct 11, 2006, 07:45 AM
Words Americans can't spell:

- Definitely

Don't worry about the British English v. American English spellings, they don't count. It's the above three that really get my goat.


I misspell it all the time --- i don't know what it -- i butcher it so well that even spell check can't fix it

MultiM
Oct 11, 2006, 09:09 AM
To be serious for a moment, I find that when my language skills slide and I consistently fail to use proper grammar and spelling, then other aspects of my life are in decline as well. When I care about how I present myself in writing, then it becomes apparent that other things are improving. Language and its' use can be an indicator of respect, not only for the self but for others.

I won't take you or what you have to say seriously if you use the wrong word, whether in context or spelling. Who could when you refuse to learn , or are too lazy, to express yourself correctly?

In my not-so-humble opinion, for what little it's worth.

gauchogolfer
Oct 11, 2006, 09:14 AM
To be serious for a moment, I find that when my language skills slide and I consistently fail to use proper grammar and spelling, then other aspects of my life are in decline as well. When I care about how I present myself in writing, then it becomes apparent that other things are improving. Language and its' use can be an indicator of respect, not only for the self but for others.

I won't take you or what you have to say seriously if you use the wrong word, whether in context or spelling. Who could when you refuse to learn , or are too lazy, to express yourself correctly?

In my not-so-humble opinion, for what little it's worth.

:cool: :cool: :cool:

I agree with your point; the only way that people here get to know us is via our writing, so why not put the best foot forward?

savar
Oct 11, 2006, 09:39 AM
I work with a lot of people for whom English is a second language...we get humorous emails sometimes. Here's (to the best of my recollection) a funny one:

"Leaving 2p today. Grandmother is at airport because coming back from INDIA."

Here I was thinking India was the name of a country, but actually its an acronym. Still haven't figured out what it stands for, though.

Chundles
Oct 11, 2006, 09:43 AM
I work with a lot of people for whom English is a second language...we get humorous emails sometimes. Here's (to the best of my recollection) a funny one:

"Leaving 2p today. Grandmother is at airport because coming back from INDIA."

Here I was thinking India was the name of a country, but actually its an acronym. Still haven't figured out what it stands for, though.


AIR INDIA = After I return I'll never do it again.

dejo
Oct 11, 2006, 09:54 AM
My biggest gripe is the people that consistently have poor spelling and/or grammar, don't proofread their posts, and admit they are too lazy or in a hurry to take the effort to proofread. Those are the people that end up in my ignore list. If they can't be bothered to ensure some sense of readability, I can't be bothered to read what they have to say.

bousozoku
Oct 11, 2006, 10:50 AM
My biggest gripe is the people that consistently have poor spelling and/or grammar, don't proofread their posts, and admit they are too lazy or in a hurry to take the effort to proofread. Those are the people that end up in my ignore list. If they can't be bothered to ensure some sense of readability, I can't be bothered to read what they have to say.

The trouble is that some of them have good points but poor presentation. I do tend to ignore cries for help when they've admitted to not searching and there are 10 or more threads on the subject, some of which are in plain sight.

emw
Oct 11, 2006, 10:55 AM
I do tend to ignore cries for help when they've admitted to not searching...Or if the title is "Please HLEP!" Double-whammy. ;)

bousozoku
Oct 11, 2006, 11:25 AM
Or if the title is "Please HLEP!" Double-whammy. ;)

It's impressive when they've been on MacRumors for 1-2 years and still do that.

Doctor Q
Oct 11, 2006, 01:42 PM
When I spot thread titles like "Help!" or "I have a problem", I try to add something specific to the thread title, in parenthesis, to increase the chances that somebody with the answer will see it and to decrease the chances that somebody with no knowledge or interest in that topic will waste a click.

To date I have never gotten a comment back about these changes, pro or con, so at least nobody seems to mind. I can't tell if the thread starters get the hint for the next time.

Using nonspecific thread titles is listed as a "minor rule" in the forum rules, but changing thread titles seems more helpful than making an issue out of it. After all, these posters are already having bad days, and may be on the verge of psychological collapse because they forgot how to sync their iPod or they can't figure out how to delete an application.

iGav
Oct 11, 2006, 01:57 PM
How very eloquent.

I try. Usually. But you know... sometimes. :rolleyes:


Swear words,

Which I did censor (to accepted journalistic standards). ;)


sexual content.

An analogy dear sir, and I bet it was an accurate one to some. Though I did miss out the word 'dry'. I regret that omission.


A post to which the rest of us can only aspire.

Well, you never know.


Pathetic.

Whilst it may be pathetic, it's arguably less pathetic than taking a somewhat condescending attitude to other peoples language skills, and feeling the need to make a post in a thread that does nothing other than correct a previous posters' grammar.

Now that is pathetic. Anal too.

Though it's not as pathetic as those that feel the need to continue the banter with others at the original posters' expense, which usually occurs when people make the seemingly cardinal sin of calling an iPod an I-pod, or a PowerBook a Powerbook or the biggest of them all... a Mac a MAC, which is than usually followed by some oh, so witty banter about a MAC address. Oh the laughter.


Oh, and it's "misplaced", not "miss placed".

*shrugs* even The Times has spelling mistakes.


Is that all you have to offer?

In this thread probably. These topics crop up reasonably frequently, usually with the same words causing the issues, so I'm sure we'll all be here again at some point, but hey.


Petty insults?

I'm not aiming any of my comments at any individual, more a general observation of what frequently occurs on these boards.


If a person can't be bothered to ensure that their post (or whatever) is spelt correctly, then why should I bother reading it?

Then surely the answer is don't.


Quite why some people seem to feel the need to wreck it... blah, blah, blah.

Personally, I can understand, appreciate and accept that not everyone has such a high level grasp of the english language, and that inevitably on a site of this size, that the quality of the language in members posts is going to vary, and will be affected by an unimaginable amount of variables, whether it be related to their age, their nationality, their quality of education (or lack thereof), their work commitments, their time restrictions or a learning disability etc, and that their posts may contain an error or two of some kind, and that maybe, just maybe it's better to not assume a somewhat self-righteous and condescending attitude by feeling the need to correct every little grammatical error that may be present in a members post.

But that's just me.


Still, ignorance is bliss and all that.

It is isn't it, I'm sure a similar thing could be said about intolerance too.

Regards. :)

emw
Oct 11, 2006, 02:05 PM
a Mac a MAC, which is than usually followed by some oh, so witty banter about a MAC address. You really should proofread your posts, because I have no idea what the heck you're talking about. The phrase "...which is than usually.." is such a blatant butchering of the English language as to be offensive.

If you're going to attempt to communicate on these boards, at least try to post in some sort of coherent way so the rest of us don't have to struggle through your posts. I have half a mind to put you on my ignore list so that I only have to read posts by people who can write as good as me.

If anyone really thinks this is serious, and not poking fun at all the people concerned about these minor typing issues, then, well, I feel sorry for you ;)

skunk
Oct 11, 2006, 02:18 PM
You really should proofread your posts, because I have no idea what the heck you're talking about. The phrase "...which is than usually.." is such a blatant butchering of the English language as to be offensive.

If you're going to attempt to communicate on these boards, at least try to post in some sort of coherent way so the rest of us don't have to struggle through your posts. I have half a mind to put you on my ignore list so that I only have to read posts by people who can write as good as me.

If anyone really thinks this is serious, and not poking fun at all the people concerned about these minor typing issues, then, well, I feel sorry for you ;)I so agree, too.

iGav
Oct 11, 2006, 02:45 PM
I have half a mind to put you on my ignore list

Why stop there... report me to Q and have me banned. Heehee :-)

Mr Skills
Oct 11, 2006, 02:49 PM
One usually sees an used with historical rather than history. Since the accent is not on the first syllable, people tend to think an historical sounds more correct than a historical. I remember a cover of Time Magazine (I think) with An Historical (something) in big bold letters.

However, the rule is that an is used before words that begin with a vowel sound. Therefore, correct usage is
a history
a historical
an honor
an unusual
a usual

In the UK, upscale publications will often put "an" before any word that starts with an "h". I believe this is because words that start with 'h' usually come originally from French, in which the 'h' is never pronounced. We only re-started pronouncing the 'h' in the last 200 years or so. But in terms of the generally accepted modern usage, you are absolutely correct. :)

Incidentally, this is also why 'h' is pronounced "aitche" and not "haitche" - which is a sure sign of someone trying too hard sound posh :D

.

.

Doctor Q
Oct 11, 2006, 03:21 PM
Isn't / called a slash? Are there people who doubt this? I've been hearing a radio ad that says to go to companyname dot com forward slash productnameIf they didn't say forward, would people really type backslashes in their URLs?

emw
Oct 11, 2006, 03:25 PM
If they didn't say forward, would people really type backslashes in their URLs?C:\GOOD\QUESTION\DOCTOR.Q

It could just be a habit for some people.

mad jew
Oct 11, 2006, 04:26 PM
When I spot thread titles like "Help!" or "I have a problem", I try to add something specific to the thread title, in parenthesis, to increase the chances that somebody with the answer will see it and to decrease the chances that somebody with no knowledge or interest in that topic will waste a click.

To date I have never gotten a comment back about these changes, pro or con, so at least nobody seems to mind. I can't tell if the thread starters get the hint for the next time.


That's very nice of you. You probably don't get any feedback because the thread starter never notices. If you have time, maybe quickly post in their thread or PM them, explaining what you've done. I'm sure they'll appreciate it and hopefully remember to use a more specific title next time. :)

gnasher729
Oct 11, 2006, 05:45 PM
Seems like an appropriate place to vent about my biggest pet peeve: reasonably intelligent people who use the magical word 'alot.' I've even seen it as 'allot,' as in, "I like this particular thread allot."

Some people allot a lot of their time to correct spelling.

MrSmith
Oct 11, 2006, 05:51 PM
Some people allot a lot of their time to correcting spelling.

;) :cool: :D

gnasher729
Oct 11, 2006, 05:58 PM
Corrections. There is no need to point out another poster's spelling or grammatical errors unless you think it is causing confusion. Remember that not all members are native English speakers. Communication, not correctness, is our goal.

Actually, it is quite important to point out other poster's spelling or grammatical errors. Remember that not all members are native English speakers, and therefore may have significant problems understanding incorrect English. Someone who learned English lets say at a school in France or Italy or Germany as a second or third language may be very confused when "their" or "there" is used instead of "they're", and will generally have a much harder time understanding anything with spelling errors. There is also the possibility that a non-native English speaker might assume that British or American posters know their spelling, and start copying their mistakes.

gnasher729
Oct 11, 2006, 06:13 PM
The grammar threads again:rolleyes:

Make it a sticky so we don't forget "MR is the Grammar nazi headquarters"


Bless

It's "Grammer Nazi", not "Grammar Nazi" :D

BTW. I like the use of "rediculous" for things that are so rediculous, they don't even deserve a correctly spelt "ridiculous".

I remember an artical about an English teacher complaining about the use of "kewl" instead of "cool". When I read it, I thought that "kewl" is really the correct spelling for someone desperately trying to be "cool" but failing miserably.

Doctor Q
Oct 11, 2006, 06:33 PM
Actually, it is quite important to point out other poster's spelling or grammatical errors. Remember that not all members are native English speakers, and therefore may have significant problems understanding incorrect English. Someone who learned English lets say at a school in France or Italy or Germany as a second or third language may be very confused when "their" or "there" is used instead of "they're", and will generally have a much harder time understanding anything with spelling errors. There is also the possibility that a non-native English speaker might assume that British or American posters know their spelling, and start copying their mistakes.If you see that happening, then the "causing confusion" condition applies and you can correct spelling in line with the rules.

But the rules weren't intended to be taken quite so literally, and the rule evolved from our general call for civil discussion, free of teasing and rudeness that can clutter threads without serving a useful purpose.

MrSmith
Oct 11, 2006, 06:57 PM
... the rule evolved from our general call for civil discussion, free of teasing and rudeness that can clutter threads without serving a useful purpose.

As should apply in any communication. But the topic of this thread is grammar and spelling, and some people apparently take the view that this thread shouldn't exist at all. Correcting people's grammar or spelling - especially without addressing the subject of their post - is rude. But here the topic of debate is the standard of English in general. I don't see why this is annoying people. Hell, I can stand up and make a statement about my sexual orientation and nobody will bat an eyelid, but mention apostrophes and all hell breaks lose. :)

bousozoku
Oct 11, 2006, 07:14 PM
As should apply in any communication. But the topic of this thread is grammar and spelling, and some people apparently take the view that this thread shouldn't exist at all. Correcting people's grammar or spelling - especially without addressing the subject of their post - is rude. But here the topic of debate is the standard of English in general. I don't see why this is annoying people. Hell, I can stand up and make a statement about my sexual orientation and nobody will bat an eyelid, but mention apostrophes and all hell breaks lose. :)

"As should apply in any communication." is a fragment, not a complete sentence. ;)

You're right, though. More people will react to spelling errors than to sexual orientation or to something else that the general public finds more important. Generally, I let things go but a few people's posts are so incredibly difficult to read that correction has to be done to even come close to the original intent.

English is an odd language because it rarely sounds the way it's written. The only language more obtuse is French and if it were written the way it sounds, it would be a lot shorter. :D

Music_Producer
Oct 11, 2006, 07:21 PM
As should apply in any communication. But the topic of this thread is grammar and spelling, and some people apparently take the view that this thread shouldn't exist at all. Correcting people's grammar or spelling - especially without addressing the subject of their post - is rude. But here the topic of debate is the standard of English in general. I don't see why this is annoying people. Hell, I can stand up and make a statement about my sexual orientation and nobody will bat an eyelid, but mention apostrophes and all hell breaks lose. :)

Which is why I started this thread.. as I saw an increase in the number of incidents regarding basic spelling errors such as 'knife/nife' 'knew/new' 'lose/loose/loze/looze' 'quite/quiet' 'then/than' etc. It certainly wasn't a thread to point out mistakes that people make and make them look like idiots. It was more like "Wow, I can't believe how these spelling errors seem to pop up everywhere. It's almost like a new trend"

However, some people actually attacked me instead of acknowledging their errors and trying to make an improvement. If someone criticizes me for whatever mistake I might have made, I quite respect that and try to see what I did wrong.. and correct it. I certainly don't reply back with a rude tone.

With basic courtesy and manners having gone to the dogs, we now seem to be losing our basic language/spelling skills as well.

Music_Producer
Oct 11, 2006, 07:32 PM
Awww, picking up on a typo. You are definitely "better" than me now, just as you are "better" than people who put loose in place of lose. You must feel you have really accomplished something in life by being able to belittle people because of the odd typographical error. You are also a hypocrite for picking up on others spelling or grammar, when your own is average.

Personally, if I write an article for print or maybe some other work that requires spelling and grammar to be correct, then I would take the time to get it 100% perfect, until then 95% will do, especially when it is a forum on the internet.

MY advice is to just chill out about it, its a forum not the national press or a application for employment, don't let it "really irritate the hell out of you".

First of all, it's not a typo. 'Leave' and 'live' are two very different words, with different meanings. If you type 'I want to liv my life/I want to livr my life'.. then yes, it is a typo. When you say 'I want to leave my life' I'm sorry.. that is not a typo. That sounds like you are tired of living and wish to live no more. So get your facts straight. Even Elrond39 corrected you on that.

Secondly, you were the one who commented that people who point out spelling errors are the ones who don't lead complete lives. That was quite uncalled for, and quite a stupid comment. I replied back in a rather humorous manner.. comparing you to Dr. Phil. You never quite understood the entire reason this thread was started in the first place. It was NOT to make fun of people who mess up on their spellings. So I would appreciate it if you would first understand what a thread is about before making retarded comments.

My grammar is average, no doubt about that. However, I do make a conscious effort to make sure that I don't spell like a 4 year old. The way people use words these days don't even qualify as spelling mistakes. They just entirely substitute the word for something else! Your post was the perfect example.

MrSmith
Oct 11, 2006, 07:39 PM
"As should apply in any communication." is a fragment, not a complete sentence. ;)*
Which leads to another point. [another fragment :D ] While forums are not chat rooms, we still write on forums as we speak, not as we would write. The aim is to communicate as spontaneously as possible, as in face-to-face communication. Therefore, it has become acceptable for formal grammar to be sacrificed...but only to the extent we don't sound like morons. :D

*I know you were teasing, BTW

Doctor Q
Oct 11, 2006, 08:16 PM
When I see bad misspellings, I tend to think people were careless. If it's a regular habit of theirs, I assume they are poor spellers or care little for correct spelling. Sometime I figure out that they aren't native English speakers. Of course, they might simply be in more of a hurry than those who proofread more carefully.

If some members are "less educated" about spelling and grammar than others, will posting corrections help them learn? It's a nice thought, but I think that most of the time the cost is too high, namely the chance that they will take offense, become shy about posting at all even when they have something to say, and the requirement that everyone else reading the thread see that "off-topic" discussion.

It occurs to me that "less educated" not only doesn't mean dumb, but it might mean "not yet finished with their basic education". Many of our members have not yet graduated from high school, and even some middle schoolers qualify to join. So perhaps they are still learning to spell and will improve over time. Then again, maybe we should be correcting them all the time to help them improve their grades!

In answer to Music_Producer's original question, I notice the widespread lack of proper spelling, but no I'm not surprised.

FredAkbar
Oct 11, 2006, 09:54 PM
Isn't / called a slash? Are there people who doubt this? I've been hearing a radio ad that says to go to companyname dot com forward slash productnameIf they didn't say forward, would people really type backslashes in their URLs?
Still better than when they say "backslash" for a regular slash, à la "apple dot com backslash iTunes.*" Bugs the hell out of me, because it's just plain incorrect. You can't go to apple.com\itunes; it just doesn't work. Why spend all that energy to add that extra syllable, just to make it incorrect, when "slash" would have been fine in the first place?

*I made that one up; don't worry, I've never heard Apple do this. Not that we hear very many Apple advertisements on the radio...

savar
Oct 11, 2006, 10:13 PM
AIR INDIA = After I return I'll never do it again.

Nice... did you make that up?

Squire
Oct 11, 2006, 10:21 PM
When I see bad misspellings, I tend to think people were careless. If it's a regular habit of theirs, I assume they are poor spellers or care little for correct spelling. Sometime I figure out that they aren't native English speakers. Of course, they might simply be in more of a hurry than those who proofread more carefully.

If some members are "less educated" about spelling and grammar than others, will posting corrections help them learn? It's a nice thought, but I think that most of the time the cost is too high, namely the chance that they will take offense, become shy about posting at all even when they have something to say, and the requirement that everyone else reading the thread see that "off-topic" discussion.

It occurs to me that "less educated" not only doesn't mean dumb, but it might mean "not yet finished with their basic education". Many of our members have not yet graduated from high school, and even some middle schoolers qualify to join. So perhaps they are still learning to spell and will improve over time. Then again, maybe we should be correcting them all the time to help them improve their grades!

In answer to Music_Producer's original question, I notice the widespread lack of proper spelling, but no I'm not surprised.


Excellent points. I think threads like these let people "vent" a bit without any of the normal fallout that would occur in another thread.

[Speaking of which, why would somebody come into a thread to criticize the topic? I just don't understand. If someone started a thread about, say, the new Porsche Cayman, I wouldn't post a comment criticizing the idea of discussing the car. It just doesn't make sense.]

I also agree with the formal vs. informal comment above. Yes, we write here in a conversational manner so nitpicking about grammar (which, by the way, isn't as black and white as it used to be) on a regular basis (i.e. in other threads) is a bit much. But, to return to my original point, I think these threads are good for the mental health of those forum readers who actually care about what they write.

-Squire

aquajet
Oct 11, 2006, 11:47 PM
As long as the ideas come across clearly, I don't really care about incorrect grammar and/or spelling. Unless of course it's difficult to understand what you're trying to communicate. But that almost never happens here.

As long as we're on the subject, there are a few things that I'd like to get off my chest. I've seen a few rather intelligent posters here that consistently mix up the following words (sorry if this has been hashed out already):

"There" is an adverb. Let's see it in action:

The cheesecake is over there.

There comes a point in a man's life in which there's nothing else to do but kill yourself. (notice the second "there" is a contraction of "there" and "is")

"There" can also be used as an exclamation:

There, there, you're back in good 'ol 1985.

You're an *******! So there!

"Their" is a possesive adjective:

I watched somebody eat their cheesecake.

Their cheesecake tastes like ass.

"They're" is a contraction of "they" and "are":

They're going to demand a refund because the cheescake was moldy.

While we're at it, let's clear up something else:

There's no such word as "alot". It's "a lot", as in:

That's a lot of cheesecake.

I've also seen "allot" used in place of "a lot". It is indeed a verb, and is correctly used in the following sentence:

Each group was allotted five slices of cheesecake.


Alrighty, I think that's it. Feel free to correct me if I've overlooked anything. :)

Doctor Q
Oct 12, 2006, 01:27 AM
Nice lesson, aquajet. Thank you. You should post one of these each week until we're all properly trained.

I thought of another aspect to this topic: pride of ownership. I want my posts to look nice, or at least correct, because they represent me here, just as I'd want my house to look nice if visitors stopped by. And it's a lot easier to type a post with a bit of care than it is to clean the house!

MrSmith
Oct 12, 2006, 01:38 AM
aquajet > Services > Summarize :rolleyes:

Ezekiel
Oct 12, 2006, 01:49 AM
[Speaking of which, why would somebody come into a thread to criticize the topic? I just don't understand. If someone started a thread about, say, the new Porsche Cayman, I wouldn't post a comment criticizing the idea of discussing the car. It just doesn't make sense.

It makes perfect sense to me, surely people are free to comment on something that they find belittling and hypocritical in a public forum? To post your annoyance at others spelling when your own is completely average is hypocrisy of the highest order.

Maybe I should start a thread about hypocrites, arrogance and belittlement, if I actually cared enough to do so that is. Which I don't.

It's almost laughable that posters are allowed to make "retard" comments with no basis whatsoever. I was a copywriter for four years, I think I know the different between the words "live" and "leave" although when writing informally in a forum environment, I don't expect one mistake in a thousand to be turned around on me and told that I spell like a four year old, especially when you go through the OP's history and spot numerous mistakes.

I don't care about IQ, I don't care about English degree's and I don't care about the odd spelling mistake, I just care about having a chat in an informal way. What next, paying a copywriter to check your posts on a forum? maybe I will send my posts directly to the editor of the Times to check through before submitting.

I feel like I am being portrayed as a complete idiot and have been made to feel intellectually inadequate because I didn't check back through my post in which I made a mistake. Completely unreasonable (especially considering how low the level of English is from the OP).

Ezekiel
Oct 12, 2006, 01:51 AM
Nice lesson, aquajet. Thank you. You should post one of these each week until we're all properly trained.

I thought of another aspect to this topic: pride of ownership. I want my posts to look nice, or at least correct, because they represent me here, just as I'd want my house to look nice if visitors stopped by. And it's a lot easier to type a post with a bit of care than it is to clean the house!

So if you do happen to make a spelling mistake is it reasonable to think less of you as a person, not having known you or your background? Would it make you any less of a person, it certainly wouldn't have any influence on how I thought of you (unless you started spelling like "hi m8 wat u doin i jus got a nu mac itz gr8").

I care much more about what you say, not if you put two letters instead of one. I wonder if Einstein ever made a spelling mistake, an idiot surely.

bousozoku
Oct 12, 2006, 02:06 AM
So if you do happen to make a spelling mistake is it reasonable to think less of you as a person, not having known you or your background? Would it make you any less of a person, it certainly wouldn't have any influence on how I thought of you (unless you started spelling like "hi m8 wat u doin i jus got a nu mac itz gr8").

I care much more about what you say not if you put two letters instead of one. I wonder if Einstein ever made a spelling mistake, an idiot surely.

Einstein put his un-cashed pay cheques in a drawer, not realising what they were. He was brilliant at science and maths and not so good at a lot of other things.

In some instances, the spelling and grammar errors make what people are writing too difficult to decode, especially in a technical environment when capitalisation and the case of letters in measurements counts.

Ezekiel
Oct 12, 2006, 02:09 AM
Einstein put his un-cashed pay cheques in a drawer, not realising what they were. He was brilliant at science and maths and not so good at a lot of other things.

In some instances, the spelling and grammar errors make what people are writing too difficult to decode, especially in a technical environment when capitalisation and the case of letters in measurements counts.

Yes, I fully agree. If I need to write something formal I will write a draft, then correct a final draft. my English is very very good although, I suppose that depends on if I am typing on a forum or typing where English is vital. I feel that just because I am standing up for people that cannot spell, that I am instantly being looked upon as somebody stupid. It's unjust and unfair.

MrSmith
Oct 12, 2006, 02:21 AM
I feel that just because I am standing up for people that cannot spell, that I am instantly being looked upon as somebody stupid. It's unjust and unfair.
Well, I don't think anyone here is talking about people who can't spell, i.e., dyslexic people.

bousozoku
Oct 12, 2006, 02:55 AM
Yes, I fully agree. If I need to write something formal I will write a draft, then correct a final draft. my English is very very good although, I suppose that depends on if I am typing on a forum or typing where English is vital. I feel that just because I am standing up for people that cannot spell, that I am instantly being looked upon as somebody stupid. It's unjust and unfair.

Never worry. We can find other reasons to come to that conclusion. :D :)

Ezekiel
Oct 12, 2006, 03:03 AM
Never worry. We can find other reasons to come to that conclusion. :D :)

;D

If people judge me on what I say and still don't like me, they are more than welcome!

Squire
Oct 12, 2006, 03:08 AM
I don't care about IQ, I don't care about English degree's and I don't care about the odd spelling mistake, I just care about having a chat in an informal way. What next, paying a copywriter to check your posts on a forum? maybe I will send my posts directly to the editor of the Times to check through before submitting.
(My emphasis above and below)

...which is exactly why I don't understand your interest in this thread. Before the little feud between you and the OP began, nobody was singled out; there were only general comments about the rampant mistakes in posts.

I feel like I am being portrayed as a complete idiot and have been made to feel intellectually inadequate because I didn't check back through my post in which I made a mistake. Completely unreasonable (especially considering how low the level of English is from the OP).
Last edited by Ezekiel : Today at 04:06 PM.

Is that so? :D

Just kidding.

-Squire

Music_Producer
Oct 12, 2006, 03:50 AM
I was a copywriter for four years, I think I know the different between the words "live" and "leave" although when writing informally in a forum environment, I don't expect one mistake in a thousand to be turned around on me and told that I spell like a four year old, especially when you go through the OP's history and spot numerous mistakes.

I don't care about IQ, I don't care about English degree's and I don't care about the odd spelling mistake, I just care about having a chat in an informal way. What next, paying a copywriter to check your posts on a forum? maybe I will send my posts directly to the editor of the Times to check through before submitting.

I feel like I am being portrayed as a complete idiot and have been made to feel intellectually inadequate because I didn't check back through my post in which I made a mistake. Completely unreasonable (especially considering how low the level of English is from the OP).

Funny how every post of yours (in this thread) has been edited. Perhaps you found the need to edit them and correct your mistakes after referring to a dictionary?

I still don't think you understand my point. You seem absolutely convinced that I am trying to belittle people who cannot spell. You don't make spelling mistakes Ezekiel, you simply use different words!

Anyway, since you've worked as a copywriter (it's obvious why they never promoted you to the post of an editor).. you obviously have a more stronger command over the English language than I do. I've worked as a doctor, as a musician and as a currency trader. Who am I to be good at English?

Let's take a look at some of your posts -

1.

I think England will go out there with a fairly week looking team tonight and beat croatia convincingly, I've seen it a million times. English teams that are expected to have a hard game win, English teams that are expected to win, lose.

*Its weak.. not week*

2.

Plagerism is alive and kicking

Please feel free to copy my posts and let me know the mistakes that I might have made. I am a non-native English speaker.. you are not. I don't have to be excellent at English.. my professions do not demand it. However, you work as a copywriter and yet you make childish errors. I am not sure where you are going with these attacks.. it simply makes you look less credible. I don't care if I am typing something in a forum, an SMS, or an e-mail. I make it a point to spell correctly, if not.. at least use the right words. You surely have intelligence, use it for *everything* and not just segregate it for certain tasks.

Geez, it's not like you're trying to spell Medulla Oblongata or something.. but if you can't discern the difference between 'weak' and 'week' 'live' and 'leave' then I don't know what to think.

We can keep attacking each other, if that's what you want. I have no interest in doing that. If you thought I was trying to 'belittle' people who cannot spell or cannot determine what word to use, then I apologize. That wasn't what I was trying to do. No, I wasn't trying to make you look like an idiot either. I would appreciate it though, if you didn't jump into my thread and label my life as 'unfulfilled'

Oh.. and it's not 'English degree's'.. it's 'English degrees' :D

Squire
Oct 12, 2006, 04:19 AM
Psst...Music_Producer...quick, get rid of the double superlative in line six of your post. (Hint: Ditch the word more.) :D

-Squire

<edit> Sorry. It's a double comparative not superlative. :D
(This thread is fun.)

Music_Producer
Oct 12, 2006, 04:37 AM
Psst...Music_Producer...quick, get rid of the double superlative in line six of your post. (Hint: Ditch the word more.) :D

-Squire

Lol Squire.. :D At least I didn't use 'Moor' :eek:

MrSmith
Oct 12, 2006, 04:38 AM
Psst...Music_Producer...quick, get rid of the double superlative in line six of your post. (Hint: Ditch the word more.) :D

-Squire

Psst...Squire...it's a comparative not a superlative

:D:D

Etc.

Squire
Oct 12, 2006, 04:44 AM
Psst...Squire...it's a comparative not a superlative

:D:D

Etc.

Nice. That was the most stupidest mistake I've made in this thread. (There. That was a double superlative.) ;)

-Squire

bousozoku
Oct 12, 2006, 04:56 AM
It's still better to use Asian languages. It's really tough to go wrong writing Chinese, Japanese, or Korean since the computer works with you in a kind of forced spell check.

English just needs a new writing method to avoid mistakes. :D

annk
Oct 12, 2006, 05:26 AM
It's still better to use Asian languages. It's really tough to go wrong writing Chinese, Japanese, or Korean since the computer works with you in a kind of forced spell check.

English just needs a new writing method to avoid mistakes. :D

Yeah, except that you can make some funny mistakes in Chinese when you aren't looking carefully enough, and pick the wrong character by mistake. People will usually still know what you mean, but it's pretty obvious you weren't paying attention when the little row of choices came up on the screen. :p

MrSmith
Oct 12, 2006, 05:51 AM
At least with an alphabet system if you have an understanding of the underlying phonics you can sound out words and attempt to match them with the corresponding letters/symbols. With kanji you either know it or you don't. Kana, on the other hand, would be nice in our system.

Gasu E.
Oct 12, 2006, 08:00 AM
I guess it's a mute point (and where in the world did that one come from? Are there places where moot and mute are pronounced the same?) :p

If "a point is that which has no part" (Euclid), then a "mute point" would be "that which has no non-speaking part."

Gasu E.
Oct 12, 2006, 08:17 AM
Im tiered of this discusion, lets get some piece all ready.

Mr Skills
Oct 12, 2006, 08:39 AM
From the BBC website:



Owed Two A Spell Chequer

Eye halve a spelling chequer
It came with my pea sea
It plainly marques four my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea
Eye strike a key and type a word And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh
As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee four two long
And eye can put the error rite
Its rare lea ever wrong
Eye have run this poem threw it
am shore your pleased two no
Its letter perfect awl the weigh
My chequer tolled me sew.

:D

aquajet
Oct 12, 2006, 12:36 PM
aquajet > Services > Summarize :rolleyes:

I don't know how to take this post.

To be frank, I'm a horrendous speller. I have to use the spelling checker nearly every time I post. :o

bousozoku
Oct 12, 2006, 12:46 PM
Yeah, except that you can make some funny mistakes in Chinese when you aren't looking carefully enough, and pick the wrong character by mistake. People will usually still know what you mean, but it's pretty obvious you weren't paying attention when the little row of choices came up on the screen. :p

Yes, you have to be awake while you're writing. ;) Of course, it's easier in Chinese to do those kinds of things since they don't have an auxiliary writing system.

At least with an alphabet system if you have an understanding of the underlying phonics you can sound out words and attempt to match them with the corresponding letters/symbols. With kanji you either know it or you don't. Kana, on the other hand, would be nice in our system.

By itself, kana leads to the same types of mistakes, so it's no good that way. Kanji prevents those mistakes with some kana to tie it together.

Anonymous Freak
Oct 12, 2006, 04:31 PM
It's = Contraction of "It" and "is"
Its = possessive, example: The dog's tail is wagging. Its tail is wagging.


I always liked "It's wagging its tail." Shows both uses rather clearly.

Other examples:

"The two gentlement went too far going to the fair."

"He was close to the door he had to close so he could change his clothes."

"I wasn't allowed to read that aloud."

"They're going over there to get their keys."

Doctor Q
Oct 12, 2006, 05:06 PM
It's nice to see affect and effect used correctly on occassion.One good effect of literacy is that it will affect your ability to learn.Just remember that effect is a noun; affect is a verb.

Perhaps the language would be better off if we threw one word away and used only the other (as many already do). After all, the meanings are closely related and others words work perfectly well as both noun and verb, even with unrelated meanings. Example: defect. Which is odd, since the noun defect applies to something that is not working perfectly well! :)

gauchogolfer
Oct 12, 2006, 05:11 PM
Just remember that effect is a noun; affect is a verb.


I know that you know, Dr.Q, but 'effect' can also be a verb. "We must effect the change we wish to see in the world."

But I didn't need to bring it up. Sorry. I was trying to head off even more confusion.

MrSmith
Oct 12, 2006, 05:19 PM
By itself, kana leads to the same types of mistakes, so it's no good that way. Kanji prevents those mistakes with some kana to tie it together.
How so? There is only one way to write tomodachi in hiragana or katakana, and every first grader could write it. In English there are various phonemes for each sound. In this case, why not frend?

Doctor Q
Oct 12, 2006, 05:46 PM
I was trying to head off even more confusion.Me too, which is why I didn't mention that less-frequent use. But I suppose you are right, that we have to give people all the facts or we're not giving a complete lesson. If I was teaching this in a classroom, however, I'd save that for Lesson II.

aquajet
Oct 12, 2006, 05:49 PM
Another common one that deserves mention: effect/affect. Both can function as either a noun or a verb (in a couple of different senses), although affect as a noun is a term used in psychology. Affecting is an interesting case in that it can function as an adjective. Let's look at some examples:

effect as a noun:

•Too much cheesecake can have a negative effect on your bowels.

•We ate cheesecake while watching the train pass and observing the Doppler effect.

•Please pick up your personal effects from the kitchen after finishing your cheesecake.

effect as a verb:

•Eating too much cheesecake can effect a stomach ache.

affect as a verb:

•Eating too much cheesecake can adversely affect your bowels.

•I will continue to affect a desire for cheesecake throughout these examples. In reality, I can't stand the stuff.

affecting as an adjective:

•After a nearly fatal accident, watching him make a cheesecake was a highly affecting moment. I was thrilled to see him up and about again.

Edit: Looks like Q beat me to it. :)

bousozoku
Oct 12, 2006, 06:08 PM
How so? There is only one way to write tomodachi in hiragana or katakana, and every first grader could write it. In English there are various phonemes for each sound. In this case, why not frend?

There is only one correct way to write tomodachi but there are many variations of incorrect ways to write it. Write the kana for tomodachi incorrectly and try to convert it to kanji and you're definitely not going to get what you want and you'll know it right away. As kana, there is no "spell" checking and it's actually more problematic than the Roman alphabet with a spell checker.

MrSmith
Oct 12, 2006, 06:44 PM
There is only one correct way to write tomodachi but there are many variations of incorrect ways to write it. Write the kana for tomodachi incorrectly and try to convert it to kanji and you're definitely not going to get what you want and you'll know it right away. As kana, there is no "spell" checking and it's actually more problematic than the Roman alphabet with a spell checker.
There is only one symbol for the sound to, one for mo, etc., and if you know how the word sounds (tomodachi, not tomadachi, say) then you can spell it without problem. You don't have to worry about choosing the correct digraph or other nonsensical combination like ough.

You are correct that if you don't know hiragana then a spell-checker isn't going to help you find it, but that's a spurious argument because you wouldn't be writing Japanese in the first place if you didn't know how to write kana.

Wow. I'm becoming a whiz at [(/)I] :)

Links
Oct 13, 2006, 02:27 AM
among
and
between

This kind of usage bugs me.
"We went to the pine forest and found him between the trees."
"He divided his money between 6 of his best friends"

1. Between is used in speaking of only two things, people, etc.:: we must choose between two equally unattractive alternatives.

Among is used for collective and undefined relations of usually three or more:
| agreement on landscaping was reached among all the neighbors.

But where there are more than two parties involved, between may be used to express one-to-one relationships of pairs within the group or the sense 'shared by':
| there is close friendship between the members of the club; | diplomatic relations between the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.

2 : Between you and I, | between you and he, etc., are incorrect; between should be followed only by the objective case: | between you and me, | between you and him, etc.

Doctor Q
Oct 13, 2006, 02:50 AM
Here's one that drives me crazy: further vs. farther.

But not the way other people misuse them. It's me. I can never remember which is which, so I avoid both of them. Shame on me!

I can always look them up, nod my head, and follow the directions, and people are always happy to remind me of the rule, but when it comes time to use one of them, I've usually forgotten once again! :o

bousozoku
Oct 13, 2006, 03:19 AM
There is only one symbol for the sound to, one for mo, etc., and if you know how the word sounds (tomodachi, not tomadachi, say) then you can spell it without problem. You don't have to worry about choosing the correct digraph or other nonsensical combination like ough.

You are correct that if you don't know hiragana then a spell-checker isn't going to help you find it, but that's a spurious argument because you wouldn't be writing Japanese in the first place if you didn't know how to write kana.

Wow. I'm becoming a whiz at [(/)I] :)

Well, not precisely a spurious argument. Little children don't know how to write kana necessarily but they can speak Japanese. Imagine if the western world suddenly needed to learn to read and write Japanese? Can you say "spelling errors"? Someone told me that they were going to sing Carrie Okie that night and I started to ask who she was and then, I realised that they were talking about kara oke. ;)

imacintel
Oct 13, 2006, 08:59 AM
Words Americans can't spell:

- Definitely
- Ridiculous
- The correct form of "lose/loose"
Ooooh, this is going to get letters...

Don't worry about the British English v. American English spellings, they don't count. It's the above three that really get my goat.

Canadian English?


Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious


:D

MrSmith
Oct 13, 2006, 09:11 AM
Well, not precisely a spurious argument. Little children don't know how to write kana necessarily but they can speak Japanese. Imagine if the western world suddenly needed to learn to read and write Japanese? Can you say "spelling errors"? Someone told me that they were going to sing Carrie Okie that night and I started to ask who she was and then, I realised that they were talking about kara oke. ;)
Exactly. The problem lies with English spelling, not kana. To all intents and purposes kana is error-free. There are various systems for writing Japanese with English letters (e.g. the Hepburn system) and these are error free because there is a 1-to-1 relationship with the kana they represent. Yes, if someone doesn't know how to speak a language then they shouldn't try to write it.

Are we going round in circles here? :D

bousozoku
Oct 13, 2006, 11:33 AM
Exactly. The problem lies with English spelling, not kana. To all intents and purposes kana is error-free. There are various systems for writing Japanese with English letters (e.g. the Hepburn system) and these are error free because there is a 1-to-1 relationship with the kana they represent. Yes, if someone doesn't know how to speak a language then they shouldn't try to write it.

Are we going round in circles here? :D

Yes, you are. :D Anyway, I know when to stop flogging the decomposing equine so I'm going to leave it alone now.

annk
Oct 13, 2006, 11:47 AM
Which and that.

One evening at dinner when I was in high school, my mother asked if I knew the difference between which and that. I didn't but she gave me a couple sentences to remember. I still have to stop and think and go through the sentences when I need to write something, but at least I have a way to do it.

("She likes books that make her laugh" = she likes books that make her laugh, but we don't know anything about her opinion of any other books)

("She likes books which make her laugh" = she likes all books, and books make her laugh)

Doctor Q
Oct 13, 2006, 02:01 PM
Good examples, annk. I think of it in mathematical terms (no surprise there): that adds a condition producing a subset, which identifies an equality or existing subset. I usually put a comma before which but not before that."books that make her laugh": {x ∊ books | x makes her laugh}

"books, which make her laugh": books ⊆ things that make her laughSince I used the phrase "things that make her laugh" in the second definition, we can apply my that definition and getbooks ⊆ {x ∊ things | x makes her laugh}which is of course a perfectly reasonable way to say that she laughs at all books. If those sets are equal, not a proper subset, then don't bother tickling her. :rolleyes:

If English were as nice as mathematics, we'd be a lot better off, but we'd need more math symbols on our keyboards!

mooncaine
Oct 13, 2006, 02:12 PM
I know that you know, Dr.Q, but 'effect' can also be a verb. "We must effect the change we wish to see in the world."

But I didn't need to bring it up. Sorry. I was trying to head off even more confusion.

To add further confusion, "affect" can be used as a noun, as in the discipline of psychology: "The patient displayed a notable lack of affect in response to the stimuli." This usage is also seen in discussions of Seasonal Affect Disorder.

mooncaine
Oct 13, 2006, 02:26 PM
If English were as nice as mathematics, we'd be a lot better off, but we'd need more math symbols on our keyboards!

Since I began working with computers and the Internet, I came to view language as code: we put the code in, and the other person's brain is the machine that must parse the code and act upon it.

If our writing has errors, then our code is buggy. Sure, some brains can manage to overcome the bugs and move on, but almost all brains slow down in the presence of bugs, if they are well-trained brains, and that means the bugs are causing problems that could have been avoided.

Meanwhile, the other brains, which are not well-trained, tend to miss important meanings in the code and, therefore, they produce errors and faults. They also tend to be slower at producing code of their own.

Moreover, since the untrained brains do not know the difference between buggy code and proper code, they continue to spew out yet more buggy code of their own, further slowing down systems of communication.

Fix the bugs in your code and you'll have the best chance of achieving the desired effect in the most brains.

Doctor Q
Oct 13, 2006, 02:47 PM
You're a good technical philosopher, mooncaine.

Another thought on the topic: It'll be a great day when our computers have algorithms sophisticated enough to recognize, parse, and correclty interpret written and spoken speech, with all its nuances and ambiguities, as well as we humans can already do in childhood.

mediababy
Oct 13, 2006, 03:41 PM
I love it when I see this more now on corporate sites. (Incorrect usage of loose | lose ).
My other favorite is when I see message boards in front of universities & they have incorrect spelling.

Fox news subtitles are notorious for it as well.

The downfall of the United States.

bousozoku
Oct 13, 2006, 03:51 PM
I love it when I see this more now on corporate sites. (Incorrect usage of loose | lose ).
My other favorite is when I see message boards in front of universities & they have incorrect spelling.

Fox news subtitles are notorious for it as well.

The downfall of the United States.

I'm always surprised at how Fox News Channel and their local affiliates seem to be under-educated on English, but over-educated on marketing. That said, all of the Orlando area channels seem to be under-educated.

Doctor Q
Oct 13, 2006, 04:49 PM
Heres a wierd websight, too accomodate you're intrest in mispelings: 100 most often misspelled words in English (http://www.yourdictionary.com/library/misspelled.html).

Dagless
Oct 14, 2006, 06:08 AM
It's also rumour, humour, honour, colour, analyse, virtualise, etc. WHERE DID THE Z COME FROM? "THE Z APPRECIATION SOCIETY"? - but we don't go into that ;)

skunk
Oct 14, 2006, 06:18 AM
WHERE DID THE Z COME FROM?16th and 17th century English, as it happens.

annk
Oct 14, 2006, 12:45 PM
It's also rumour, humour, honour, colour, analyse, virtualise, etc. WHERE DID THE Z COME FROM? "THE Z APPRECIATION SOCIETY"? - but we don't go into that ;)

I think the Great Vowel Shift™ is pretty spooky (and fascinating). I know it happened over a period of time, but it reminds me of my text book in 9th grade history class, which stated that feudalism ended on August 4th, XXXX (can't remember the year). I thought that was very funny. :p

p0intblank
Oct 14, 2006, 12:49 PM
I get really irritated by people using "Your" instead of "You're"

That's my #1 annoyance when it comes to bad grammar. I just can't stand it!

bousozoku
Oct 14, 2006, 04:26 PM
That's my #1 annoyance when it comes to bad grammar. I just can't stand it!

They rarely mess up "I'm" or "I've" or anything pertaining to themselves, though. Well, not really, I've seen a lot of people leave out the apostrophe. You know, they're just to difficult to type.

plinkoman
Oct 14, 2006, 05:00 PM
What really pisses me off is that no one seems to know the difference between the words "then" and "than"

Then is used when there is an order involved. "First I eat, then I play video games."

Than is used as either a comparison, or in a conditional statement (aka, if, than statement). "My pen is bigger than yours", or "If I drink too much, than I will wake up with a hangover".

*edit: Apparently, my english 110 teacher was not entirely correct. I just checked this with the dictionary, and apparently the conditional statement "if, then" is infact then, and not than. Than is used in comparison, exception and conjunction.

but nevertheless, many people still use the wrong one in many cases.

Doctor Q
Oct 14, 2006, 05:24 PM
What really pisses me off is that no one seems to know the difference between the words "then" and "than"I've never noticed people getting that one wrong. But you are probably correct, and now I'm going to notice it! :eek:

bousozoku
Oct 14, 2006, 06:19 PM
I've never noticed people getting that one wrong. But you are probably correct, and now I'm going to notice it! :eek:

It happens a lot on MacRumors. I'm surprised that you've missed it.

dhan
Oct 14, 2006, 08:49 PM
This paragraph from 2003 must really piss everyone off:

Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

http://www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/~mattd/Cmabrigde/ (http://www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/~mattd/Cmabrigde/)

I want to say more, but I'm afraid to type now. Thanks guys. :eek:

MrSmith
Oct 14, 2006, 08:59 PM
Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.
How I sound after ten too many :D

Frmhertuore, the eye sancs and rtses on erevy 7th or 8th wrod on agvaere.