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Sesshi
Dec 13, 2006, 01:41 PM
I thought posting this on a non audiophile forum might elicit some positive answers. Doing so on such forums just gets me sidetracked because far more people have a tendency to recommend what they want instead of what they have.

I'm after some really, really, really comfortable headphones. Many of the 'audiophile' headphones are just too heavy, clampy, whatever. Also any highly localised pressure on top of my head gives me a headache.

I don't really care about the absolute sound quality as long as it doesn't sound terrible. I'd be fairly happy if it for example sounded like a Sennheiser PX100 in terms of overall quality. I need it to go over the head, and around the ears (not over them). Large squidgy cushions a plus, but high weight a definite minus.

Any suggestions?



psychofreak
Dec 13, 2006, 01:44 PM
If you're looking for in-ears, shures are the way to go. I had some troubles (which I posted) at first, and now I love them.

Sesshi
Dec 13, 2006, 01:49 PM
No in-ears. I have the Ultimate Ears UE-10 (which have been remoulded a couple of times), and I don't like using them very much. Does strange things to my ears. Neither do I like the Shures.

zimv20
Dec 13, 2006, 01:50 PM
comfort is subjective, of course, but i can wear my sony 7506's for extended periods w/o trouble. that includes having one ear on, one off for filmsets.

Sesshi
Dec 13, 2006, 01:53 PM
comfort is subjective, of course, but i can wear my sony 7506's for extended periods w/o trouble. that includes having one ear on, one off for filmsets.

The MDR-7506 makes my ears hurt.

zimv20
Dec 13, 2006, 01:56 PM
The MDR-7506 makes my ears hurt.
sonically, i assume you mean. or do you mean comfort-wise?

either way, i have no other recommendations.

Sesshi
Dec 13, 2006, 01:57 PM
sonically, i assume you mean. or do you mean comfort-wise?

either way, i have no other recommendations.

Both actually - it feels like a plunger and sounds like sandpaper :eek:

zimv20
Dec 13, 2006, 02:35 PM
Both actually - it feels like a plunger and sounds like sandpaper :eek:
yikes. i'm interested to know what pair you'll end up with.

bousozoku
Dec 13, 2006, 03:04 PM
Practically anything from Sennheiser is comfortable and better than average.

Ish
Dec 13, 2006, 03:29 PM
Sounds as though you live in London. Why don't you go over to the Apple Store and try them all on? There are plenty in varying prices. Don't know of any other shops that have them all out to try. Most of them seem to think you should buy them on the basis of what you can see in the packet.

Sesshi
Dec 13, 2006, 03:37 PM
@bousozoku: What would you recommend that's really lightweight and comfy then? There's a lot of models in the Sennheiser range - and none I've had so far has turned out to be all that comfortable.

Sounds as though you live in London. Why don't you go over to the Apple Store and try them all on? There are plenty in varying prices. Don't know of any other shops that have them all out to try. Most of them seem to think you should buy them on the basis of what you can see in the packet.

Well... it is kind of gross, trying out something which has been on several hundred, if not thousands of potentially sweaty, cootie-infested, etc heads. Right now I am quite tempted by the Bose Triport which the Apple Store do have. I've only ever tried it and just for short periods but it did seem quite 'invisible' on the head. But I've damaged headphones the way I'm trying to use it now by running over the cable with the chair and dragging the phones from the table as well as putting it down too hard on the desk, something I unfortunately do a lot now I'm working a lot more often from home - to pick up a call, etc. The Triports look about as strong as a paper bag, which worries me.

thedude110
Dec 13, 2006, 03:44 PM
I need it to go over the head, and around the ears (not over them). Large squidgy cushions a plus, but high weight a definite minus.

Any suggestions?

Not sure I get the difference between around/over the ears, and these go more around than over the head, but I like these (http://www.amazon.com/PHILIPS-USA-HS-386-Behind-the-head-Headphones/dp/B0006IWPT0):

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/B0006IWPT0.01._SS500_SCLZZZZZZZ_V1131113023_.jpg

Then, I'm not likely to spend more than $10 on headphones (just don't use 'em enough), and I used Air Canada headphones for a good two years before they finally crapped out on me.

Sesshi
Dec 13, 2006, 03:45 PM
Backphones give me temple/earache.

bousozoku
Dec 13, 2006, 03:52 PM
@bousozoku: What would you recommend that's really lightweight and comfy then? There's a lot of models in the Sennheiser range - and none I've had so far has turned out to be all that comfortable.
...


I'd think that you'd find either the HD477 (130g without cable) or the HD485 (220g without cable) comfortable. There are high specification/higher priced headphones with many brands but I don't see the numbers helping when it comes to light headphones over $100. If you want phenomenal bass, you have to add mass and headphones become uncomfortable.

I've used Sennheiser Open-Aire headphones for hours on end with no discomfort. I can endure my Logitech headset but it's nowhere near as pleasant and my ears ache within 30 minutes.

Sesshi
Dec 13, 2006, 05:01 PM
As I'm given to understand both sit on rather than around the ear, and any type of headphone htat does that gives me discomfort.

ChrisA
Dec 15, 2006, 04:26 AM
....I'm after some really, really, really comfortable headphones. Many of the 'audiophile' headphones are just too heavy, clampy, whatever. Also any highly localised pressure on top of my head gives me a headache.

I bought the AKG K240 about 20 years ago. Not much reason to ever buy another headphone. The sound is near perfect and I can wear them all day The cushions are large enough diameter that they don't go on the ears but around them. AKG calls this "circumaural". On-line price is about $100

They are "open" design so they are best used in a quiet location and they do take a bit of power. But even an iPod can drive them if you turn the iPod volume to maximum. The sund is best described as "accurate". Not the heavy bass that kids go for. These are studio monitor headphones.

http://www.akg.com/mediadatabase/psfile/datei/72/studio_hea4055c1a24d59f.pdf

netdog
Dec 15, 2006, 04:30 AM
I know you said you don't want in-ear as you find them uncomfortable, but I have to give another vote for the Shures.

My 4Cs are incredibly comfortable. The soft liner is amazing. I can't imagine a more comfortable headphone, external or in-ear.

Sesshi
Dec 15, 2006, 05:00 AM
As I said, I have the Ultimate Ears UE-10 (http://www.ultimateears.com/custom/UE-10-Pro.htm) - a custom-fitted pair of in-ear phones. Even with adjustments they do something to my ear. They do not work for me. The same (but worse) goes for ALL the Shures I've had, even with the soft flex tips. Plus, they're a bugger to insert/remove - just not practical for the use I have in mind.

Jasonbot
Dec 15, 2006, 11:09 AM
http://members.aol.com/headphone1/a1cw834.jpg

Mmmmm, I can just see the comfort in those WWII radio operator 'phones! ANd they use a standard jack, even better.

bgalizio
Dec 15, 2006, 11:13 AM
Etymotic ER6 connected with custom molded musicians earplugs.

http://www.etymotic.com/ephp/er6.aspx
http://www.etymotic.com/ephp/erme.aspx

Sesshi
Dec 15, 2006, 06:34 PM
@scottlinux: Dang. They look just up my street... although the impedance of 2.2Kohms is kind of steep for my amp to power.

And how many times must I say...
NO EFFIN IN EARS?

Thanks. Any advance on the Triports?

Oirectine
Dec 17, 2006, 02:18 AM
I don't remember the brand or model number (I think the exact pair I used is actually discontinued but they still make similar headphones) but when last I was in my (music) school's computer labs, I used these headphones that I literally forgot I was wearing a couple times. They're SO big that they fit entirely around the ear, not even touching them, and the headband was just a couple pieces of elastic so you can barely feel it. It was really amazing. The sound quality was just superb, as well. The drawbacks are that the things are HUGE, and probably expensive, as well. But yeah, I could barely feel them. I wish I could remember what brand they were (I'm 90% leaning towards AKG but might've been Audio-Technica).

Oh wait! Now that I actually go back and read the thread, I agree with Chris:

I bought the AKG K240 about 20 years ago. Not much reason to ever buy another headphone. The sound is near perfect and I can wear them all day The cushions are large enough diameter that they don't go on the ears but around them. AKG calls this "circumaural". On-line price is about $100

product26
Dec 17, 2006, 02:38 AM
I have these:
AKG K240 Studio (click for specs) (http://www.akg.com/products/powerslave,mynodeid,186,id,252,pid,252,_language,EN.html)
http://www.akg.com/mediadatabase/pspic/image//50/image1079364426_k240studio4055cb4939d21.jpg (http://www.akg.com/picture.php?txt=%3Cstrong%3EFor%20image%20download%3A%20right%20click%20image%2C%20click%20%22Save%2 0Picture%20%28Image%29%20As%22%2C%20click%20%22Save%22.%3C%2Fstrong%3E&pic=/mediadatabase/pspic/hires//29/k240studio4055cb4939d21.jpg)
Click The image for a very high resolution image

Notice the design, they are intended for long studio sessions, comfort in mind. They are designed to self adjust, and sort of just 'float' on your head. The sound quality is great, they are studio quality.

sammich
Dec 17, 2006, 03:05 AM
You should have a look at these:

Sennheiser HD590 (http://www.sennheiserusa.com/newsite/productdetail.asp?transid=004590)

Having used it for couple of years I haven't regretted one second it owning it. Virtually weightless, no pressure/very evenly distributed around the head fantastic sound quality, plus they don't cook your ear even for hours on end.

They were around AUD$300 when I got them, I don't think they make them anymore. Perhaps you can leftover stock somewhere.

Sesshi
Dec 17, 2006, 01:38 PM
I know I know, it's getting into nitpick territory but it does bother me - the K240 is too heavy. I have a K701 which is the same weight and after a while that weighs on my head.

(no I am not a weed. I guess I'm just particular about comfort)

ChrisA
Dec 17, 2006, 10:03 PM
I know I know, it's getting into nitpick territory but it does bother me - the K240 is too heavy......

Only one option left: Studio monitor speakers.

Sesshi
Dec 18, 2006, 03:11 AM
Got'em already.

bousozoku
Dec 18, 2006, 03:42 AM
Only one option left: Studio monitor speakers.

Those will really be heavy on his poor, delicate ears. ;)

theblotted
Dec 21, 2006, 03:45 AM
give 7506 another try. but with:

-Beyer DT250 felt pads: makes 7506 uber comfortable to wear, i can wear'em 8 hours straight without any pain. it'll sit on your ears instead of pressing against it. 1-800-293-4463 Just ask for the velour pads for the DT-250. They cost $17 + $5 shipping.

-different sponge layers: i'm using AKG 240's sponge over the metal diaphragm. changed the clarity and detail of sonics dramatically. experiment with other kinds.

hey, at least it's a cheaper alternative. a good one at that. i do music for a living and above mods have helped a great deal.

Sesshi
Dec 21, 2006, 04:18 AM
If I was doing that, I could just get the DT250 of course. The 250's on the upper end of the acceptable weight scale and I do find the earpads comfortable. I might get a set and let the Triport and the 250 fight it out.

dogbone
Dec 21, 2006, 04:29 AM
@Sheshi,

OK, I know you said 'around' and not 'on' the ears but I still think you should consider a pair of 'on ears' that have a unique solution. The Koss Porta Pro, they are extremely light and very comfortable. They have temple pads which take all pressure off the ears, and the ear pieces have a 3 way locking position where you can make them come even further from the ear. The net result is ultimat comfort.

The sound quality is, unbelievable. Rich, tight base and sparkling highs, with a very open sound. They even make a $6 dollar transitor radio sound good. Oh, and they also fold up into a tiny bundle. They also have a lifetime guarantee that Koss will honor faithfully.

http://www.itkom.com.ua/portapro_big-new.jpg
http://www.mobile-review.com/mp3/review/image/koss/porta-pro/pic02.jpg

Sesshi
Dec 21, 2006, 04:48 AM
I actually found they put pressure ON the temples, maybe I had it set wrong or something - it's possible. Sound quality was OK but I would go pick the Sennheiser PX100 given the choice. But neither are in contention at this time.

Sesshi
Dec 22, 2006, 10:24 AM
A Bose Triport is on the way :D Hopefully will be with me in the new year.

dllavaneras
Dec 25, 2006, 12:02 AM
Ever since I used my first over-the-ear headphone, there's no going back to any of the others :D

I currently own 3.

Aiwa HP-223 (http://www.amazon.com/Sharp-HPX223S-Aiwa-Style-Headphones/dp/B000220DDU): By far the most comfortable of the 3, Lightweight, but quite big. Sound's ok, definitely not the best of the 3. They have a bit of trouble with bass, and the treble is a bit distorted. It not that bad, though. Definitely better than all the in-ears I've used. They are a dream on your ears. Extremely comfortable.

Stanton Dj Pro 60 (http://www.amazon.com/Stanton-DJ-Pro-60/dp/B00070DW6M/sr=8-1/qid=1167025183/ref=sr_1_1/002-8424667-3019203?ie=UTF8&s=musical-instruments): The least comfortable (they don't go completely over the ear, unless you have a small head :p ) of the three, but the best sound quality of them all. Small, really light, and they only start bothering me after 4-5 hours. A quick readjustment and I'm good to go.

The third pair I have is by Jwin, but I can't remember the model. Here's (http://farm1.static.flickr.com/138/332457549_13bbc07f7c_o.jpg) a pic of me using these headphones. Not a really good pic, but it's the only one I've got right now. Durable as hell, and really comfy. They've been with me for 3 years now, and have withstanded downpours, rock climbing, rappel (all kinds, even down a waterfall) and they still work :) The sound quality's in between the other two.

Let us know how your Triport sounds and feels!

djdawson
Dec 28, 2006, 11:49 AM
I know it's a bit late, but I really, really like my Audio-Technica ATH-A900's. Great sound and oh so comfy, but a bit pricey. There's a picture at this Yahoo shopping link:

http://shopping.yahoo.com/p:Audio-Technica%20ATH-A900%20Headphones:1993413188

HTH

Sesshi
Dec 28, 2006, 02:32 PM
I know it's a bit late, but I really, really like my Audio-Technica ATH-A900's. Great sound and oh so comfy, but a bit pricey. There's a picture at this Yahoo shopping link:

http://shopping.yahoo.com/p:Audio-Technica%20ATH-A900%20Headphones:1993413188

HTH

Yeah - I thought about going back to Audio-Technicas but they're very heavy: The A900 tips the scales at 300g's and there was something about the A900's sound that I eventually found kind of rough after a while. And it was at that sort of point where I'd even trade some sound quality for something that sounded smoother. No sign of the Triports yet.

Sesshi
Jan 16, 2007, 03:20 PM
Let us know how your Triport sounds and feels!

I think in terms of feel, I've found the perfect headphone. The Triports are fairly lightweight and they sit on the ear and my head in a way that I find hard to fault. They're fully circumaural, the pads cushion just enough to make the headphones 'disappear'.

Soundwise I'd agree with many of the reviews that the bass is overemphasised, but only if you're reviewing these in a cubicle, at home, etc. But - I've found this attribute very effective as a portable headphone, especially with iPods which have a slight bass reduction in any case. Apart from the bass I find the rest of the sound is harder to fault than I first thought. Treble and midrange clarity is fine for a headphone of this price, and it's obvious from the manual that the bass over-emphasis is actually designed in to the product bearing in mind its intended use as a semi-portable phone. And if you de-emphasise the bass using EQ, the Triport does a very creditable job even for home use.

I'm slightly dumbfounded as thinking myself an audiophile and checking out 'audiophile' websites I've got used to the disparaging comments against Bose. It's actually a fairly decent headphone.

zimv20
Jan 16, 2007, 03:42 PM
cool, glad you found something you like. thanks for the review, too.

bsummersett
Feb 9, 2007, 07:40 PM
I second the AKG K240 Studio headphones. Definitely the most comfortable and best sounding headphones I've ever used.

amd4me
Feb 9, 2007, 09:15 PM
@bousozoku: What would you recommend that's really lightweight and comfy then? There's a lot of models in the Sennheiser range - and none I've had so far has turned out to be all that comfortable.



Well... it is kind of gross, trying out something which has been on several hundred, if not thousands of potentially sweaty, cootie-infested, etc heads. Right now I am quite tempted by the Bose Triport which the Apple Store do have. I've only ever tried it and just for short periods but it did seem quite 'invisible' on the head. But I've damaged headphones the way I'm trying to use it now by running over the cable with the chair and dragging the phones from the table as well as putting it down too hard on the desk, something I unfortunately do a lot now I'm working a lot more often from home - to pick up a call, etc. The Triports look about as strong as a paper bag, which worries me.

No highs no lows must be BOSE.

Sesshi
Feb 10, 2007, 04:50 AM
No highs no lows must be BOSE.

Are you a Head-Fi.org member by any chance?

BCains
Feb 10, 2007, 08:16 AM
I have closed-back Audio-technica ATH-M40fs (http://www.audio-technica.com/cms/headphones/7c784888146c212e/index.html) and absolutely love them.
Great sound balance, excellent freq range and they weigh 250g.

devilot
Feb 10, 2007, 08:17 AM
Are you a Head-Fi.org member by any chance?Don't hafta be to learn that mantra. I've read that quite a few times here on MR. :p

Sesshi
Feb 10, 2007, 08:55 AM
I suppose it comes from embittered audionerds who have been browbeaten into the selection of Bose by their better halves over their choice of a more impressive looking (and not significantly better, although the difference in their head is a hundredfold) esoteric setup which they wanted :p

Nevertheless nothing Bose that I've tried or had has given me any major reason for complaint when used in the way it's intended to be. I think the Wave is OK for people who want that sort of thing. I agree there's better sounding, but in that mode of use it's more about the package. I prefer the UE-10Pros when flying but I've found the QC's to be very comfortable and pretty effective. The Triport isn't as incisive sounding as probably its nearest competitor - the Sennheiser HD25 - but it's a whole new world in terms of wearing comfort and is perfect for me for casual use.

Sidetrack here but as I've said many times before on this forum - although it's been more usually on the subject of Macs vs PC's - you might like to give something a fair shake before you trash it just because every other nerd around you does, because the chances are they they've never done that too. I've had other apparently intelligent, apparently decent people sending me hostile PM's because I speak from practical experience, I'm direct about it and that disagrees with their one-sided opinions - and I find it amusingly offensive ;)

amd4me
Feb 10, 2007, 08:52 PM
Are you a Head-Fi.org member by any chance?
No,I actually like amazing sound.
BOSE is'nt terrible but far too expensive for what you get!

Sesshi
Feb 10, 2007, 09:27 PM
All right, which comfortable, circumaural, reasonably portable and isolated headphone would you recommend which sounds better than the Bose for less money?

nose
Feb 11, 2007, 04:02 AM
Grado fan here! and yes I'm a Head-Fi member too..

I myself prefer the supra-aural over the circumaural headphones partly do to the smaller size. I feel like I got a football helment on me head with the cricumaurial headphones on. the supra-aural design is one of the things that make Grado sound so good or to the ones that prefer them. they are light weight and the headband is sturdy enough that it can be bent out and away from the ears to conform to your head if it's big or you have ears that are sensitive and tender. I myself prefer the tight fit but I am also one that prefer boots laced tight over comfy shoes worn loose. they also break in in time just like good shoes. all models except for the 60's(Soft pads) and 1000's come stock with Bowl pads. if your ears are small they will actually fit inside the Bowl pads. they can be washed and even replaced with 3 different Grado pads with varying comfort and SQ(Bowl, Flat & Soft pads). all 3 pads can be purchased from www.ttvj.com

the 60's sale for $69 and is one of the best reviewed headphones for making a headphone upgrade at it's price point. I have the 80's and the 225's. all Grado's are easily driven by an iPod for they are 32ohms yet a headphone amp will bring out the best in them. they are also open end headphones which I also prefer. SQ is suppose to be better with open end and they also allow me to hear things going on in the background. they come stock with nice heavy cabling instead of the flimsy cabling many headphones come with. the 60's and 80's come stock with a 1/8th Mini jack.

for a slightly different sound signature made by Grado there is also the Alessandro series. the MS1's are considered a very good headphone at $100.

Grado's are actually what turned me back into listening to headphones. they sound that good to me!

:apple: :cool: just 2 cents worth from a head-fi member..

Sesshi
Feb 11, 2007, 05:27 AM
I suppose it is just like a Head-Fi'er to recommend a totally open, pretty fragile, uncomfortable, supraaural headphone with huge cables when asking for a comfortable, circumaural, reasonably portable and isolated headphone :rolleyes:

nose
Feb 11, 2007, 08:48 PM
I suppose it is just like a Head-Fi'er to recommend a totally open, pretty fragile, uncomfortable, supraaural headphone with huge cables when asking for a comfortable, circumaural, reasonably portable and isolated headphone :rolleyes:

open or closed was not a requirment in your original post, Grado's are far from fragile and sturdier than the Bose you ended up with :D The Triports look about as strong as a paper bag, which worries me. Grado's are very comfortable but that's a matter of opinion. the Bowl pads are thick and cushy and if ya got small ears they are circumaural. I do not think you even knew what circumaural or supra-aural even meant in your original post. Large squidgy cushions a plus Grado's do not have huge cables, there's much larger but they do have very good built cables that can take a bit of abuse and much better than the ones on the Bose.But I've damaged headphones the way I'm trying to use it now by running over the cable with the chair Grado's are very much as portable as the Bose! many use Grado's as portables. and Grado's have a much better SQ at a better price bracket than the Bose! but I forgot SQ was important to you. I don't really care about the absolute sound quality as long as it doesn't sound terrible.

me gonna sit back and enjoy me Grado 225's, HR MicroAmp and DAC connected to me iMac to watch a movie and then some music before bed. peace!
:apple: :cool:


Really comfortable headphones?
I thought posting this on a non audiophile forum might elicit some positive answers. Doing so on such forums just gets me sidetracked because far more people have a tendency to recommend what they want instead of what they have.

I'm after some really, really, really comfortable headphones. Many of the 'audiophile' headphones are just too heavy, clampy, whatever. Also any highly localised pressure on top of my head gives me a headache.

I don't really care about the absolute sound quality as long as it doesn't sound terrible. I'd be fairly happy if it for example sounded like a Sennheiser PX100 in terms of overall quality. I need it to go over the head, and around the ears (not over them). Large squidgy cushions a plus, but high weight a definite minus.

Any suggestions?
__________________

Sesshi
Feb 12, 2007, 04:01 AM
It looks like you were responding to the post above, not my original post.

open or closed was not a requirment in your original post, Grado's are far from fragile and sturdier than the Bose you ended up with :D

Not if the Grados I've had are any evidence to go by. They are pretty fragile headphones - I've had earcups literally drop off and the build quality on models like the RS-1 is very amateurish compared to the competition. It's not just the build quality that's suspect but the design that allows the phones to do stuff like drop off. The bowl pads are like sandpaper and they are in no way circumaural unless you're a pixie. Do you know what circumaural is? It means they go completely around the ear and no part of it sits on the ear. The Grado cable sleeves tear relatively easily and are over-stiff, and that combined with the length makes it less than manageable than even say an AKG K701 cable. As far as a casual use headphone goes, I can actually find a lot more issues to brood over with even on an SR80 than a Triport.

If I really want to listen, I have other systems - speaker based systems considerbly better than any headphone system can manage. If I have to, there are also other better-performing headphones (which I don't find as comfortable as the Triport) I can use.

nose
Feb 12, 2007, 03:59 PM
Sidetrack here but as I've said many times before on this forum - although it's been more usually on the subject of Macs vs PC's - you might like to give something a fair shake before you trash it

It looks like you were responding to the post above, not my original post.



Not if the Grados I've had are any evidence to go by. They are pretty fragile headphones - I've had earcups literally drop off and the build quality on models like the RS-1 is very amateurish compared to the competition. It's not just the build quality that's suspect but the design that allows the phones to do stuff like drop off. The bowl pads are like sandpaper and they are in no way circumaural unless you're a pixie. Do you know what circumaural is? It means they go completely around the ear and no part of it sits on the ear. The Grado cable sleeves tear relatively easily and are over-stiff, and that combined with the length makes it less than manageable than even say an AKG K701 cable. As far as a casual use headphone goes, I can actually find a lot more issues to brood over with even on an SR80 than a Triport.

If I really want to listen, I have other systems - speaker based systems considerbly better than any headphone system can manage. If I have to, there are also other better-performing headphones (which I don't find as comfortable as the Triport) I can use.

you have all this audiophile experience and still chose a set of Bose? over RS-1 and AKG 701? :eek:

last night there was 3 other post on the 3rd page before the one that you posted today. I wonder what happened to them?

I can leave this thread and honestly say you have taught me a lot!

I'm glad your happy with your decision, peace!:apple: :cool:

Sesshi
Feb 12, 2007, 04:24 PM
you have all this audiophile experience and still chose a set of Bose? over RS-1 and AKG 701? :eek:

No I didn't choose it over those two, don't be silly :p And it has to be said the RS-1/K701 have been the least of my 'experiences'.

I wanted a pair of comfortable casual headphones which I could wear for a long time to do all sorts of stuff. As I put it, I didn't need it to be 'audiophile'. For me, for the time I've been using it I have to say it works great for me. Better than the 'audiophiler than thou' choices in a similar bracket such as the Sennheiser HD25 - which fails in a big way on comfort.

But you know what, if you're using it anywhere but inside your home the Triport is better than the RS-1... because you can actually hear the music ;) I never understood people who use Grados on the move for that reason.

nose
Feb 13, 2007, 12:27 AM
No I didn't choose it over those two, don't be silly :p And it has to be said the RS-1/K701 have been the least of my 'experiences'.

I wanted a pair of comfortable casual headphones which I could wear for a long time to do all sorts of stuff. As I put it, I didn't need it to be 'audiophile'. For me, for the time I've been using it I have to say it works great for me. Better than the 'audiophiler than thou' choices in a similar bracket such as the Sennheiser HD25 - which fails in a big way on comfort.

But you know what, if you're using it anywhere but inside your home the Triport is better than the RS-1... because you can actually hear the music ;) I never understood people who use Grados on the move for that reason.

it's not very difficult to hear something directly against your ears! :rolleyes:

not everyone wants to be totally isloated from the world. it's a bit of a plus to have a little outside bleed in to be able to hear what's going on around me. it's not very much different than listening to speakers in or outside of your home, work.. car stereo for example and in the same note portable environments vary with background noise. not everyone is around a jackhammer.

not much into Senn's meself! although many poeple enjoy them. it's obvious the RS-1 and 701's are the least of your experience. for me after even hearing the bottom end of the Grado line I would not want anything less for any listening environment. not even me old STAX. not to mention what the HR MicroAmp and DAC do for me Grado's! makes me Mac sing and they are portable too..

it's good that ya got what ya want and they work just great for you! and as you put it you did not need an audiophile headphone.
cool with me for it's you that you have to make happy, peace! :apple: :cool:

Sesshi
Feb 13, 2007, 02:42 AM
it's not very difficult to hear something directly against your ears! :rolleyes:

not everyone wants to be totally isloated from the world. it's a bit of a plus to have a little outside bleed in to be able to hear what's going on around me. it's not very much different than listening to speakers in or outside of your home, work.. car stereo for example and in the same note portable environments vary with background noise. not everyone is around a jackhammer.

You know, people who say this are most likely to say later on "I get this ringing in my ear. What can I do about it?"

it's good that ya got what ya want and they work just great for you! and as you put it you did not need an audiophile headphone.
cool with me for it's you that you have to make happy, peace! :apple: :cool:

Thanks.

nose
Feb 13, 2007, 04:11 AM
You know, people who say this are most likely to say later on "I get this ringing in my ear. What can I do about it?"


your so negative! not a very happy person are you? I'm so sorry! is there anything I can do to help?

did some one at head-fi hurt your feelings? poor pitiful thing..

Sesshi
Feb 13, 2007, 06:30 AM
your so negative! not a very happy person are you? I'm so sorry! is there anything I can do to help?

I suppose I ought to damp down my sarcasm when making a point. Listening by defeating environmental noise is a major cause of tinnitus. The sound pressure being delivered into your ear by e.g. a Grado when you're turning up the volume to try to listen even in an (lets for generalisation's sake say) low-noise urban outdoor area can easily approach hearing-loss levels. It's one of the major reasons I shy away from open phones for any listening outside of quiet spaces. If you value your hearing, Grados and suchlike will be the very last headphone on your list for portable use.

did some one at head-fi hurt your feelings? poor pitiful thing..

Not at all. It's just that among all the stealth product placements and the peer groups, it's not been of much help to me for quite a while now.

Mr. Amiga500
Feb 13, 2007, 08:32 AM
I've got a Grado SR125 and I agree that the cushions are pretty flimsy and a bit rough. They occasionally fall off and now have cracks in the centre (after a couple years of use though). I've got small ears and they almost fit entirely inside the centre of the cushions, but they're certainly not circumaural. The speaker part presses directly against my ear and gets uncomfortable after about an hour.

The sound quality is great, but you need perfect silence to be able to enjoy it. You can hear any little external noise. While listening to my music, I can hear a dog bark outside or the sound of rustling paper in the next room. I bet I could hear a rat sneeze in the basement. I don't like the distractions. I want headphones that cut me off from the rest of the universe.

Only buy Grado headphones if you also need to listen to external sounds - like the sound of CIA agents sneaking into your house to perform an "extraordinary rendition".

nose
Feb 13, 2007, 05:28 PM
I suppose I ought to damp down my sarcasm when making a point. Listening by defeating environmental noise is a major cause of tinnitus. The sound pressure being delivered into your ear by e.g. a Grado when you're turning up the volume to try to listen even in an (lets for generalisation's sake say) low-noise urban outdoor area can easily approach hearing-loss levels. It's one of the major reasons I shy away from open phones for any listening outside of quiet spaces. If you value your hearing, Grados and suchlike will be the very last headphone on your list for portable use.

listening to headphones period at high volumes is a major cause of tinnitus! and there's mixed reviews on this about open and closed. and in studies unless you have really good isolation headphones on many are still gonna crank the volume up in noisy environments.

not everyone listens at high volumes or feel a need to drown out background noise. I find it a plus that I can hear me cat talk to me, the phone ring, a knock at the door, an automobile screaming up behind me, the person next to me speaking to me, etc.. rather than being isolated from it. no difference than listening to speakers at low volume. background noise can vary to your environment! not everyone is gonna be next to a jackhammer or on a busy street.

Not at all. It's just that among all the stealth product placements and the peer groups, it's not been of much help to me for quite a while now.

when your OP is asking for suggestions and people are giving you their thoughts you should very well show them a little more respect. they were my opinons and my thoughts and I wasn't pushing anything on you. just my thoughts on a few of your post. gather what you need of it and ya can even talk with me about it but please do not act like an ... to me. there was a post at the top of this 3rd page from another member and in few words said the same thing. I do not know where his post went including the other two I posted that seemed to vanish over night.

nose
Feb 13, 2007, 06:08 PM
I've got a Grado SR125 and I agree that the cushions are pretty flimsy and a bit rough. They occasionally fall off and now have cracks in the centre (after a couple years of use though). I've got small ears and they almost fit entirely inside the centre of the cushions, but they're certainly not circumaural. The speaker part presses directly against my ear and gets uncomfortable after about an hour.

The sound quality is great, but you need perfect silence to be able to enjoy it. You can hear any little external noise. While listening to my music, I can hear a dog bark outside or the sound of rustling paper in the next room. I bet I could hear a rat sneeze in the basement. I don't like the distractions. I want headphones that cut me off from the rest of the universe.

Only buy Grado headphones if you also need to listen to external sounds - like the sound of CIA agents sneaking into your house to perform an "extraordinary rendition".

I have a set of SR-80's that me bud gave me that are over 7 years old with original pads that still manage to hold on as well as me new SR-225's. worn yes but I can say they have never fallen off. one of the cool things about Grado's is that those pads can easily be taken off and washed. as well they can be replaced with at least the 3 different Grado replacement pads(Bowls, Flats and Soft) with varying degrees of comfort. many prefer the Flat and Soft pads for comfort over the Bowls. many instead feel the Bowls give the best SQ and have no problem with them.

I also have very small ears and the Bowls fit over me ears with no real pressure on them. what little there is I have long gotten use to. no Grado's are not circumaural but when they fit around your ears with the majority of the pressure around the outside of your ears they just might as well be circumaural. the sturdy metal band can also be bent out to relieve any pressure you may have. I personally prefer the smaller size and lightweight of the Grado's instead of the larger cups that make me feel like I got a football helemet on. not to mention some of the large headbands. Grados are not for everyone and many cannot stand to wear them but I myself as well as others can wear Grado's for hours on end. as much as 10 hours plus meself on wasted days.

xparaparafreakx
Feb 19, 2007, 06:40 PM
For $125, you can get some Denon DJ Headphones, HP 1000.
For about $200, you can get Beyerdynamic DT770.
And if you can, Ultrasone Proline 750 for about $400, I got them for $300 which was a steal.

All of them comfortable, just depands on what you want.

newbie builder
Feb 19, 2007, 07:31 PM
Grado SR80s. Love 'em.