PDA

View Full Version : Student sues to be sole valedictorian


Stelliform
May 10, 2003, 01:17 PM
I read this on CNN (http://www.cnn.com/2003/LAW/05/09/valedictorian.lawsuit.ap/index.html) yesterday.

And I just found this more detailed article. (http://www.southjerseynews.com/issues/may/m050303c.htm)

another.... (http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/magazine/daily/5774517.htm)

.....

trebblekicked
May 10, 2003, 01:45 PM
jesus, that is pathetic. on so many levels. i don't even know what to say. i hate the competitiveness of school in the first place, i hate people who sue for no reason, i hate parents too involved in their kids affairs, i hate people who cry discrimination for very little thing...
obviously i hate a lot of things. this should never have happened. be happy with co-valedictorian. it's a great achievement. not like harvard's going to reject you because there was someone shared the title with you. there are plenty of people in th world who are just as good as you. get used to it. you can't sue them all.

Stelliform
May 10, 2003, 01:50 PM
I have found what could be comments (http://www.homestead.com/swygert/files/archive/2003_04_27_archive.html) from kids in her class. Or they could be false, but they sound convincing

I go to school with Blair at Moorestown High School. We are both seniors and have known each other forever. She is a ridiculous human being. She is dysfunctional as well as her whole family. They are very wealthy and are manipulating our tax dollars to be selfish and attention needy. She was getting a C in Algebra 1- so her parents pulled her out and got her a home tutor so that she'd get an A, and amazingly Blair pulled through to get that A+...incredible eh? There's no reason for anyone to feel bad for Blair, shes pathetic. She was lucky that she was even getting part of the valedictorianship, considering she doesn't come to school and isn't part of our grade. And isn't it just, oh too convenient for Blair that she plans on being successful in college, and studied at Stanford over the summer without help, but couldn't make it through a few hours of high school. Lets be serious, her condition is a joke, the entire senior class at MHS knows it, and is fighting back! No one should feel bad for Blair!
anonymous | Email | 05.06.03 - 4:53 pm | #


Okay, our entire school is against this girl. Just like the post above, she had a C in Latin and switched out of it so that she could miraculously get an A+ by the end of the quarter. What people are not hearing is that this girl is a crybaby and is just trying to fill the shoes of her brother who went to harvard and was his class's valedictorian. I don't believe that she has any condition except for being a mental basketcase. If she had such a chronic fatigue disorder, how was she able to go on our 5 day class trip to florida or numerous mock trial events? I don't feel bad for her and I hope that kenny countersues and becomes the sole valedictorian.
Dave | 05.06.03 - 5:14 pm | #


Also, I forget to comment on the whole gym thing. Gym is the only valid argument that we really have against Blair. The classes she takes are complete b.s. and the grades she gets are extremely inflated. They're not comparable at all to the grades that everybody else receives, yet for some reason, they are. She has been in my classes before and she is not smart at all! I was angry enough that she was going to be a co-valedictorian, but then when i found out that this little brat was suing the school to be the sole valedictorian, my anger level towards her hit an all time high.
Dave | 05.06.03 - 5:20 pm | #


What you have to understand is that it is not only the fact that Blair doesn't have a gym class and therefore it does not factor into her GPA. Also, because Blair doesn't have to take gym, she is able to take yet another AP class. In fact, Blair is able to take more classes than a student enrolled in the high school. At the school, students are limited to the number of classes they can take because of scheduling conflicts and the mere fact that there are only 9 periods in a day. Gym class and lunch take away from where Blair can schedule another credit course. Blair is able to double the course load of a student enrolled in the district, not being tutored at home. And not only is she able to, she does.

It is also interesting to note that Blair does not actually take the same class as her peers enrolled at the high school. Her tutors follow the school's curriculum of the high school but she does not take the same tests as her peers and she does not even take the same final as others in the class. Her grades do not suffer because of pop quizzes. Her teachers (those working in the Moorestown High School, those filling out her report card) receive a letter from her tutor stating the grade that she has earned in that marking period. Never once did her AP Physics teacher see a homework page, quiz, or test showing the grade or the level of difficulty. Are her tests an equal difficulty to those of her peers? Quite frankly, we don?t know.
Anonymous | Email | 05.06.03 - 5:39 pm | #

pyknosis
May 10, 2003, 02:11 PM
Thanks for posting these comments from her schoolmates. They all have good points. When I first read about this story, the article stated that the student suing to be sole valedictorian had already been accepted to 5 ivy league schools, so I couldn't understand why it was such a big deal to be valedictorian. I think, as was suggested above, she's just a spoiled b*tch. Anyways, just to prove how frivolous our legal system has become, she won her lawsuit (CNN article (http://www.cnn.com/2003/LAW/05/09/valedictorian.lawsuit.ap/index.html) ) and is seeking punitive damages of $2 million. Simply unbelievable. It's because of the fact that people like this girl become lawyers that lawyers tend to be the moral bottomdwellers of society.

macktheknife
May 10, 2003, 02:24 PM
Personally, I think the saddest thing about this is the amount of energy wasted on something so meaningless. As the author of the Philadelphia Inquirer noted:

I'd feel differently if being the school's sole valedictorian would affect her in some way. But she's already been accepted at Harvard. She's already won scholarship money. She's well on her way to forgetting all about high school.

I graduated from high school back in 1996 and college back in 2000. I've won my share of honors, awards, etc. And you know what? They mean almost NOTHING in the real world. Will anyone really care that she was the class valedictorian, especially the only body that would ever care (Harvard) has already accepted her? If this girl does not exercise greater tact and human interaction skills, then she'll be in trouble. What is she going to do when her supervisor tells her straight up he doesn't give a damn about her being a class valedictorian? Sue him to make him recognize it? What is she going to when her snobbiness turns everyone against her? Sue them to force them to be her friend?

macktheknife
May 10, 2003, 02:40 PM
BTW, you can read her profile here:

http://www.studentrewards.com/scholarships/discover.html

The girl won a whopping $25k to go to Harvard despite being wealthy enough to have home tutors. Me? I was a perfectly healthy boy without any health problems who graduated from a school in the ghetto where Snoop Doggy Dog and all the other gangsta' rappers attended before they hit it big. I went to UC Berkeley, borrowed more than $15k, and got a part-time job to pay my way through school because my parents were too poor. <sigh>

Let me just add one more thing: I'm not a GQ model or anything, but I'll just say that in addition to suffering from chronic fatigue, she apparently also suffers from a case of ugliness.

P-Worm
May 10, 2003, 03:27 PM
This doesn't make any sense. Why would anyone ruin a reputation they have built over something so meaningless? I have a question. Do any of you think she actually took those AP tests, or did she take the classes? If she took them, I want to see the scores. Three's won't count to me in this case.

P-Worm

lmalave
May 10, 2003, 04:03 PM
Originally posted by pyknosis
Thanks for posting these comments from her schoolmates. They all have good points. When I first read about this story, the article stated that the student suing to be sole valedictorian had already been accepted to 5 ivy league schools, so I couldn't understand why it was such a big deal to be valedictorian. I think, as was suggested above, she's just a spoiled b*tch. Anyways, just to prove how frivolous our legal system has become, she won her lawsuit (CNN article (http://www.cnn.com/2003/LAW/05/09/valedictorian.lawsuit.ap/index.html) ) and is seeking punitive damages of $2 million. Simply unbelievable. It's because of the fact that people like this girl become lawyers that lawyers tend to be the moral bottomdwellers of society.

It gets worse. I'm sure she and/or her brother become a politician or a very successful business person. Her dream job is to be a poverty lawyer? Yeah ********** right. She's just saying what the Ivy League admissions want to hear.

Unfortunately, examples like this teach the unfortunate lesson that the way to get ahead in this world is to work the system as much as possible and bend the rules as much as possible (if not break them outright). Apparently honor is for suckers who just don't have what it takes to win.

Stelliform
May 10, 2003, 04:23 PM
.....

iJon
May 10, 2003, 04:44 PM
my school is like that too. athletics and any sport is credited less than a regular class. if you take a year of athletics you only get semester credit.

iJon

bennetsaysargh
May 10, 2003, 05:26 PM
my school district is so messed up because of state requirements.

that person seems like a snobby spoiled brat who gets everything she wants. i don't understand why she wouldn't want to be co-valedictorian. i want to see if she gets her way or not.

she will have to get uswed to the fact that people are always better than you in something.

rainman::|:|
May 10, 2003, 05:28 PM
well normally i say if a school has a validictorian, it has ONE. if not, fine (actually all the better). If the validictorian candidates have the same GPA, go by extracurricular activities or attendance or something.

But... this situation sounds different, and i can sympathize with the competitiveness. Not directly, i was a D-student for the most part, but in our school the megaperfect students were rallying the school board to award an extra like .2 for an A+, which sort of makes sense, since the other grades have a distinction. But when you realize these kids' GPA would then compete with other (normal) schools' kids' GPAs, it's not really fair at all...

i did support it at the time tho, i actually managed an A+ in like two classes... :)

pnw

macktheknife
May 10, 2003, 05:40 PM
Originally posted by lmalave
It gets worse. I'm sure she and/or her brother become a politician or a very successful business person. Her dream job is to be a poverty lawyer? Yeah ********** right. She's just saying what the Ivy League admissions want to hear.

Yup. Isn't funny how such people have the luxury to say they want to work as a poverty lawyer? After all, mommy and daddy's money will carry them through anything, so they can pretty much persue what they want or say they want. I had friends who bummed around after graduation going to Europe (with their parents' money, of course) and taking a year off trying to decide what to do while I had to scramble to find a job and pay off my student loans.

The most ironic thing is that I'm such a capitalist (I work in finance), but hearing cases like this brings out the Marxist side of me. :D

baby duck monge
May 10, 2003, 06:30 PM
yeah, this girl pretty much is just a petty b*tch. getting this recognition will do nothing other than further her own ego - something that seems like a very bad idea. and if what is said about her pulling out of classes she wasn't doing well in, only to do well with a private tutor is true... majorly sketch!!

most ironic to me, though, is something from her profile page...


An Olympic Torchbearer in 2002. "I was so excited, I could barely sleep!"

so she can do the distance carrying an olympic torch, but she can't manage a PE class. please. there are PE classes at most schools that you can get through with minimal physical exertion.

herr_neumann
May 10, 2003, 08:52 PM
You guys are missing the point. The school was saying she got an advantage because she was given accomadations for her disabilty. Accomadations are given to even things out, not to give an advantage. She was right to sue, the school had the head up their *ss. Oviously no one here knows anyone with a disability or about discrimination.

evil
May 10, 2003, 09:03 PM
daMn.....if there ever wasnt more proof for forced abortions!

lmalave
May 10, 2003, 09:41 PM
Originally posted by herr_neumann
You guys are missing the point. The school was saying she got an advantage because she was given accomadations for her disabilty. Accomadations are given to even things out, not to give an advantage. She was right to sue, the school had the head up their *ss. Oviously no one here knows anyone with a disability or about discrimination.

I agree with you in principle, but her "disability" was "chronic fatigue". Judging from her classmates' comments, apparently what happened is that she would start a class in the classroom, and when she looked headed for a bad grade, she would then drop out of the class due to "chronic fatigue", and finish the class with a tutor that would magically give her an A+.

So I agree with you that in principle a disabled student should not have an "asterisk" next to their valedictorian status because they could not take gym class, and the judge's ruling was a correct one. But I think what people are reacting to is the person not the legal principle. I think a student that fakes a disability so that she can receive grades from her home tutor and boost her GPA does a great disservice to students that actually are disabled.

Stelliform
May 11, 2003, 12:05 AM
.....

rainman::|:|
May 11, 2003, 12:44 AM
for the record, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is a very real and very devistating disorder. But it sounds like she was really taking advantage of it here... missing PE is one thing, and appropriate for the syndrome, but the other stuff sounds shady...

pnw

herr_neumann
May 11, 2003, 01:19 AM
Yeah, but none of us KNOW what her accomodations were. We know what her classmates say, but a bunch of gossiping high school students are exactly the most reliable source. Moreover, it is not like the government does not check into disability claims. They actually make those with disabilities jump through more hoops than they should to get accomodations. I have a feew friends who have some minor mental disabilities and the *ssholes here at UCDavis give them the bare minimum in the way of accomodations. If they thought they might have to pay out $2.5 million they might rethink things a bit. As it is a punative damage I do not think that this girl should get the money though. Punishing the school is not winning the lottery. The money should go to a well established charity of the girl's choosing.

pseudobrit
May 11, 2003, 01:34 AM
The lawsuit describes Kadri's actions as "a malicious and intentional act designed to reduce (her) opportunity for academic success."

Does anyone believe that a Superintendent would actually do this to a student -- single her out to devalue her? I mean, I know a teacher or a disciplinarian or sometimes a principal will do crap like that, but I don't see someone with so little student contact like a Super doing it.

It sounds more to me like somone poked their head in his office and said, "hey, you know that slacker b**** that never shows up -- y'know, the one with the judge dad who threatens to sue us for everything? Yeah, she's about to get valedictorian and some people are pretty upset,"

...and he decided to cause as few waves as possible with the girl and her daddy by doing the co-valedictorian thing. Oh well, some people are never happy.

pseudobrit
May 11, 2003, 01:50 AM
Originally posted by herr_neumann
Yeah, but none of us KNOW what her accomodations were. We know what her classmates say, but a bunch of gossiping high school students are exactly the most reliable source.

The students were in her classes. They were "fellow" honor roll AP students. I'd take them a little more seriously than cheerleader gossip.

Moreover, it is not like the government does not check into disability claims. They actually make those with disabilities jump through more hoops than they should to get accomodations. I have a feew friends who have some minor mental disabilities and the *ssholes here at UCDavis give them the bare minimum in the way of accomodations.

High schools are not under the same type of supervision or government control as State colleges. They're run by local school boards. Things are arbitrary from local district to district.

---

I hope not only that she gets booed but that the entire student body walks out or turns their back on her as she speaks at graduation.

herr_neumann
May 11, 2003, 01:59 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by pseudobrit
[B]The students were in her classes. They were "fellow" honor roll AP students. I'd take them a little more seriously than cheerleader gossip.

KNowing the kids I had my AP and GATE classes with I would give them less credit than cheerleaders. The smart kids gossip for a purpose.

I remember hating the stupid B*tches who gave speeches at my graduation, we heckeled them. The whole valedictorian thing is pretty lame to begin with, the graduating class should vote on who they want to give a speech. My HS had the stupid ass apeach teacher choose. I graduate UCD next month and I couldn't begin to tell you how they choose. Probably more of the same BS. One less reason to walk.....
... the excuses keep coming.... to bad my grandparents would never go for me not walking...


Oh yeah, and we are not a STATE school. UC meaning University of California, not CSU or California State university. Go to a sporting event between a UC and CSU when the UC is the home team, you will hear the State School chants.

pseudobrit
May 11, 2003, 02:30 AM
Originally posted by herr_neumann
Oh yeah, and we are not a STATE school. UC meaning University of California, not CSU or California State university. Go to a sporting event between a UC and CSU when the UC is the home team, you will hear the State School chants.

UCD gets no state funding? I would presume a state authority would have control over the disability accomodations being met, if not, then much like high schools, it's a hit-and-miss locally controlled sort of thing and just because UCD has problems with compliance doesn't mean a high school in NJ will.

herr_neumann
May 11, 2003, 06:05 AM
Originally posted by pseudobrit
UCD gets no state funding? I would presume a state authority would have control over the disability accomodations being met, if not, then much like high schools, it's a hit-and-miss locally controlled sort of thing and just because UCD has problems with compliance doesn't mean a high school in NJ will.

If you wer familiar with the college system here in california you would realize that we have a three tiered system, the lowest being JC (junior college) then CSU then UC. So yes the UC gets state funding, Although it is like 25% of the uc budget and california is cutting $300million from that. And the disablitity accomodations are assigned by the UCD disability coordinator, who give very little in the way of accomodations.
The authority in disability claims is actually a fedral one though, as most claims are under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Our current administration us seeing that the ADA is dismantled. We wouldnt want companies hindered by pesky little guidlines, only individual people (by that I mean individuals that do not have loads of money).

Dignan
May 11, 2003, 11:54 AM
Ok, my comments.

Both these girls are coming here next year. Trust me, both these girls will be nagged for their bullsmokey.

I hope that the girl is suing for the reason she claims, that people didnt want to give her full valedic just cause she is disabled. I also hope that these kids bashing her are only doing so because of the media spotlight and jealousy. But I have a feeling that these might be high hopes. My point is...they both got into Harvard, right? So who cares? Trust me, not everyone at Harvard is like that. People like that, annoying overachiever prefrosh who try waaay to hard their first year, they end up having mental breakdowns or suicide attempts, or they get beaten into the system like everyone else.

Also, her getting 20k package is not a big deal, harvard gives out tons of money, because they want the smartest people, and they can afford it (18 billion endowment, they can afford it.)

But I am glad I wont have to deal with these girls next year....

trebblekicked
May 11, 2003, 01:34 PM
Originally posted by herr_neumann
Oviously no one here knows anyone with a disability or about discrimination.

i knew kids in high school with cysitic fibrosis that would suck it up and go to gym class. they have low impact PE for special needs kids, (in other words, i do know people with disabilities. they'd more likely be pissed at her for milking the system, then suing it when it didn't work out for her)

the kids comments are most likely out of jealousy. take them as you will. oh, and one more thing: she didn't have the stamina to handle a high school course load? HTF is she going to handle harvard?

DakotaGuy
May 11, 2003, 02:08 PM
This exactly reason that my HS quit awarding an actual Valedictorian. The school I teach in now does not award this either. In fact, most schools in my state have stopped this practice. There was a case back in the 80's in my hometown where a kid got beat-up and put in the hospital because he beat someone else for the honor. The Board of Education got rid of it shortly after that. We still award honors based on GPA, but we do not know who is Number 1. I think it works better, since no one really cared and cut throats. The idea is not to compete with your peers, but to compete with yourself to do the best you can do.

Does the honor really matter? I don't know one of the girls that I knew graduated in the top of my class She was a straight A student and she failed out of college. She is 26 andliving at home now working a min. wage job. I graduated 19 out of 25 in a small high school. I graduated from college with honors and my working at my career.

Flyers486
May 11, 2003, 07:39 PM
This girl goes to school in the town next to mine. It has been the talk of the county (Burlington County NJ) for the past week. I have competed against her in Mock Trial competitions, her team winning every year because he father is a Camden County Superior Court Judge. She never seemed to have a dissibility to me when she competed in the courtroom only a bit too rehearsed. Rumors about her have spread like wildfire to my town (right next to eachother and "rivals"). It appears she won't be attending graduation, but will be at her villa in Italy. If she was to attend, however, studetns planed on protesting her speach by turning their backs reading newspapers and such. Quite a sad story, I truly hope it is her parents and not her.

Greg

madmizzen
May 12, 2003, 04:26 AM
Originally posted by herr_neumann
You guys are missing the point. The school was saying she got an advantage because she was given accommodations for her disability. Accommodations are given to even things out, not to give an advantage. She was right to sue, the school had the head up their *ss. Obviously no one here knows anyone with a disability or about discrimination.

Take a closer look at what happened, she was in fact given an advantage by not being required to attend gym. Because of her school's weighted GPA policy the effect of her not being required to complete gym in accordance with county school guidelines set up a situation where she was able to achieve a higher GPA then the highest possible GPA available to her fellow classmates.

It would have been easy for the school to enforce a policy where students unable to attend gym for whatever reason are required to take some other personal enrichment non-academic class in its place. It seems wildly unfair to her colleagues that she, for whatever reason, was able to exempt herself from gym and use that time in a way that the rest of the student body was precluded from.

What your saying is that instead of using disability law to even an otherwise uneven playing field we should use the law to weight situations in favor of whomever we deem to be the most needy.

wwworry
May 12, 2003, 06:08 AM
Her quest to be the sole valedictorian seems a bit petty, yes. But I also wonder about all the indignation shown on this thread. This is some small town girl in highschool where none of us live. What is the point of this virtue? America now seems to revel in it. What is the point of all these manufactured courtroom dramas? unified in our affront. Does it really make us better people to stand in righteous judgement over the fly?

caveman_uk
May 12, 2003, 09:32 AM
What's a valedictorian? Like that 'hazing' thing last week I'm sure the school system in the US uses a different language to everywhere else ;)

Is a valedictorian some sort of best in year award? If it is it does seem really petty and unimportant. I've got a PhD and a degree and people really don't give a damn what I did in school. As it was I just did enough to see myself through to the next stage. What's the point of knocking yourself out when the end result is much the same in the long run?

mactastic
May 12, 2003, 10:12 AM
I seem to remember reading an article a while ago where a diabled student sued to get more time on a standardized test, and didn't want the achievement to be marked with an asterisk. While I totally agree with accomodating as much as possible those with disabilities, the result of this kind of decision where the scores are reported as equal even though they were earned with varying levels of difficulty is that unscrupulous people (usually pushy parents IMHO) will see it as OK to get their kids (and only their kids) into these kinds of special situations where they don't deserve it. The problem is generally not with the people with actual (and truly debilitating to some extent) disability. It is with those who would take advantage of the system to further their own selfish, petty goals. Same goes with ADA, I'm definetly glad we take the accomodation of the disabled into consideration now, but those who abuse it with frivilous claims, or ridiculous requests defy the spirit of the act. Perhaps this girl is disabled, but it seems like she has it better than a lot of other disabled people who do need more assistance. I think the real problem is that there is no way of catagorizing how much "accomodation" a person needs. For example, I had 2 friends in my college classes, both considered "disabled" by the college. One was a quadraplegic, the other had diabetes. Both were treated as equally "disabled" even though the one with diabetes was perfectly normal except for having to test himself and administer shots of insulin occasionally during class. Both were treated the same by the school in terms of available services, early class enrollment etc.
OK end of rant, but once again (as in so many areas of life) a few people will ruin something for the rest of us.

Stelliform
May 12, 2003, 11:56 AM
......

lmalave
May 12, 2003, 12:13 PM
Originally posted by Stelliform
A valedictorian is usually a person who has the highest grades in the graduation class. Apparently many schools handle the process differently. In my highschool we had as many valedictorians as we needed. So if we had 3 perfect scores we had 3 valedictorians. They would pick only one to give a speach at graduation. Usually the one who was most involved.

Apparently at this girl's school there is usually only one. Her brother was valedictorian, so I have a feeling alot of this is to make sure that she is just like her brother.

This reminds me of a conversation I had in my first week of college during orientation. This guy from Tanzania also didn't know what valectorian meant so he asked me. I explained to him that it was given to the person with the highest grade average. So he was like: "Oh, I was valedictorian!". And I was like, oh, that's great, you were valedictorian of your school. And he was like: "No, I'm valedictorian of Tanzania".

Apparently, Tanzania has a national public education system with a uniform curriculum, so they're actually able to rank students nationally. Pretty wild meeting the valedictorian of a freakin' country! :eek:

bennetsaysargh
May 12, 2003, 03:05 PM
Originally posted by lmalave
This reminds me of a conversation I had in my first week of college during orientation. This guy from Tanzania also didn't know what valectorian meant so he asked me. I explained to him that it was given to the person with the highest grade average. So he was like: "Oh, I was valedictorian!". And I was like, oh, that's great, you were valedictorian of your school. And he was like: "No, I'm valedictorian of Tanzania".

Apparently, Tanzania has a national public education system with a uniform curriculum, so they're actually able to rank students nationally. Pretty wild meeting the valedictorian of a freakin' country! :eek:

that's awsome! it would be an honor to be valedictorian of one school, but country is very impressive!

MacFan921
May 12, 2003, 03:06 PM
All arguments about fairness and discrimination aren't really the same in this case. It almost makes me laugh reading the article, saying she was discriminated against. What bothers me is that this girl is not trying to even out the score and bring herself up...she's trying to push somebody down. Other articles have referenced other graduation law suits, but the diference is that those suits involve somebody fighting to become valedictorians themselves, not take the title away from somebody else. She still is receiving the title of valedictorian, but to sue for being the SOLE valedictorian is rediculous and it just shows how greedy and selfish she is. The only argument really valid for me is the one that there should only be one valedictorian. This isn't right because being valedictorian isn't a contest, it's an honor and an award. Certainly, more than one person can be valedictorian without it being any less of an honor. If I was valedictorian when I graduated (I was pretty close too by the way), I would not be bothered at all by having other people share the honor with me, no matter what tiny GPA differences (wasn't it like a .005 difference?) there were.

rainman::|:|
May 12, 2003, 04:58 PM
the answer to this discrimination thing is simple... do away with PE class :D

pnw

DakotaGuy
May 12, 2003, 05:02 PM
Originally posted by paulwhannel
the answer to this discrimination thing is simple... do away with PE class :D

pnw

Paul, I hope you meant that as a joke considering how many children are inactive and overweight these days.

bennetsaysargh
May 12, 2003, 05:20 PM
Originally posted by Abercrombieboy
Paul, I hope you meant that as a joke considering how many children are inactive and overweight these days.

i don't mean for this to be taken offensively, but almost all of the overweight kids in my school just stand there and let all of the preppy athletic kids do all of the work. they talk to each other about anime and video games. doing away with PE i think would be good, or at least cut down on it. bad part about me saying this is by the time any kind of new PE thing would be put in place, i would be out of college!

szark
May 12, 2003, 05:47 PM
My PE classes were always a good mix of team-based and individual subjects, which prevented most people from "coasting" through on other people's abilities.

I definitely don't think PE classes should be eliminated -- quite a lot of students (such as myself) benefit greatly from the exercise we would otherwise ignore. My general state of health dropped considerably once I left high school and PE classes behind.

Regarding the topic of this thread, I think that some sort of low-impact activities should have been devised to work around her disability and allow her to take the PE class.

lmalave
May 12, 2003, 07:39 PM
Originally posted by bennetsaysargh
i don't mean for this to be taken offensively, but almost all of the overweight kids in my school just stand there and let all of the preppy athletic kids do all of the work. they talk to each other about anime and video games. doing away with PE i think would be good, or at least cut down on it. bad part about me saying this is by the time any kind of new PE thing would be put in place, i would be out of college!

Ha, even my college had PE requirements. I went to a tech school...gotta whip those sorry-ass nerds into shape :D

bennetsaysargh
May 12, 2003, 08:12 PM
Originally posted by lmalave
Ha, even my college had PE requirements. I went to a tech school...gotta whip those sorry-ass nerds into shape :D

what kind of requirements were those?

question fear
May 12, 2003, 08:49 PM
Ha, even my college had PE requirements. I went to a tech school...gotta whip those sorry-ass nerds into shape

i hear that. I go to brandeis and we have to complete two semesters of PE to graduate. Granted, it can be filled with something like CPR or power walking, but it has to be health and fitness oriented. whats really funny is that the people who donated our swimming pool had attached a rider that forced students to successfully pass a swim test in order to graduate. luckily we managed to override that my freshman year...not that i dont know how to swim, just that it seemed rather odd that my BA rode on being able to tread water for 2 minutes. Maybe they were trying to teach us real life experience....

anyhow, on topic again, i feel like this entire situation is odd. regardless of weighted/unweighted GPAs, it just seems odd that she would be suing to be sole valedictorian. all the other facts, vis a vis her weighted/unweighted gpa and whether she had special help in her classes, only seem to be important as background to her story...and if anything only make more of a case for co-valedictorianship. think about it: her grades reflect tutoring and not being forced to take gym. so, shes been reasonably accommodated (assuming that her claims/sickness is true-not getting into that debate). the co-valedictorian has had a "normal" experience and her gpa reflects one representative of the avg student excelling. assuming the first student was reasonably accommodated by the actions taken, she was therefore given a nearly equivalent high school experience. ergo, there is no real discrimination, as she, by being given a reasonable accommodation, has essentially been brought level with her peers. and if she, on a peer to peer level, ties with one, then she ties. end of story. or at least thats how i read it.
(if this got too mucked up in its construction, as i often get, i am sorry)
--carly

lmalave
May 12, 2003, 11:20 PM
Originally posted by bennetsaysargh
what kind of requirements were those?

Had to take 4 PE classes. There was a wide variety of PE classes offered, though. Also, each semester of playing a varsity sport counted as 2 PE classes. There was also a swimming requirement. And a writing requirement. And everyone had to take 8 humanities classes, minimum. They were very big into making sure we were well-rounded nerds.

bennetsaysargh
May 13, 2003, 05:52 AM
Originally posted by lmalave
Had to take 4 PE classes. There was a wide variety of PE classes offered, though. Also, each semester of playing a varsity sport counted as 2 PE classes. There was also a swimming requirement. And a writing requirement. And everyone had to take 8 humanities classes, minimum. They were very big into making sure we were well-rounded nerds.

at least they were well-rounded nerds! and could run to the apple store:D:p

Dignan
May 13, 2003, 12:33 PM
A good harvard crimson article about it, harvard student reaction (wanting to reneg on her admission, etc.)

http://www.thecrimson.com/today/article348093.html

Stelliform
May 13, 2003, 10:27 PM
.....

bennetsaysargh
May 14, 2003, 03:31 PM
Originally posted by Stelliform
It is interesting to watch unfold. I am dying to see what happens at graduation. I doubt Harvard will rescend its offer to her. Because we know she will sue. :)

BTW Congrats on your 500 bennetsaysargh. :)

thanks!:D my little brother (10 years old) is so excited. i don't know why.

i am also looking forward to se what happens in this story. funny conversation in the always off topic math class. we could make it a math problem! another day wasted in math!:D:D

tazo
May 16, 2003, 08:47 PM
disabled brat sues to be "biggest" brat. that should be the headline. No offense to any whom this may apply to, but honestly, if you need the selfsatistfaction of being a valedictorian of your high school, a fact that will help you in no way during your normal life, then you have an extremely low self esteem.

runningman
May 20, 2003, 09:09 AM
I think the worse thing about this is that she is using the label of handicap to benefit herself. She supposedly has chronic fatigue syndrome but is able to found and chair 5 different organizations, participate in mock trials, go on 5 day road trips without difficulty and take more than the expected course load of an ordinary student without difficulty. Then uses the argument that she's protecting the handicap student while filing a 2 million dollar lawsuit against a school district which is trying to provide services to handicap people. If lost this will directly affect the districts ability to educate student and this all stems from a .05 difference in GPA between 2 people. I say take the class she substituted for gym and weight it the same. This girl is not stupid as her SAT score testifies she has used the law to her every benefit just as her father stated. But once again might makes right.