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MacRumors
Jul 2, 2007, 12:54 AM
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Reuters reports (http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070702/tc_nm/apple_dc_1) on the activation errors that have been causing major problems for some iPhone users. According to Reuters sources, approximately 2% of individuals who purchased the iPhone over the weekend have been affected by the activation problems.

AT&T spokesperson blamed the delays on both technical and "process related" issues, and also pointed to the high volume of customers trying to activate service.

An Associated Press article (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070702/ap_on_hi_te/apple_iphone_90;_ylt=ArycuuFKJIhY5imH9_VUUxhU.3QA) claims the problems are now improving, and Apple acknowledged that "a small percentage of iPhone customers who have had a less than perfect activation experience".

Our own iPhone Help and Troubleshooting forum (http://forums.macrumors.com/forumdisplay.php?f=109) has a dedicated topic (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=322126) for Activation issues.



Xtremehkr
Jul 2, 2007, 01:01 AM
I wouldn't say 2% was bad. There must be an enormous amount of people trying to activate new phones, in a very short period of time. 6.15pm on 6/29/07 must have been hell for the activation dept. at AT&T.

arn
Jul 2, 2007, 01:02 AM
right, estimate 250,000-500,000 iphones

2% = 5,000-10,000 people

The problem is 50% of the early adopters run a blog :) The other 50% post in forums...

arn

zgh1999
Jul 2, 2007, 01:07 AM
Many of the 2% are grown men and women who act like little babies.

It has only been 48 hours since the launch, and such a minor delay has caused these babies to cry and whine all over the place.

Jeez. Have these folks ever ported a number before?

Again, this problem is inherent in any cell phone purchase/activation.

So why the fuzz?

Put it another way, had Apple or AT&T require all customers to activate their iPhones in store, you would likely have many many more people whining about the long lines and wait.

"Oh! It has been 7 hours and still not activated! I am pissed and angry!"
"This thing has no 3G and it is slow! I am disappointed!"

Give Apple and AT&T a break guys, and stop whining like it is the end of the world. You are lucky to have the chance to use the iPhone. No one is forcing you to buy it -- and Apple and AT&T have never claimed that there would be no activation delays.

So stop blowing this out of proportion and stop focusing on all the negatives.

AlBDamned
Jul 2, 2007, 01:07 AM
Yup, 2% is not bad I feel, although I think the figure is probably higher just because if it was 30%, for example, there's no way AT&T would admit it!

zgh1999
Jul 2, 2007, 01:14 AM
Several hours of delay or 1-2 day delays in activation and porting -- for ANY cellphone -- is NORMAL.

Most people got their iPhones activated online within minutes -- including the installation of updated iTunes and system updates.

The small number of iPhone buyers who whined about the delay are starting to play into the hands of Apple's detractors and are giving Apple users a bad name.

It is now all over the news. Happy now?

Again, folks at Apple and AT&T have worked hard to bring this product to the market place -- and all some folks do is to hit out at them when small inevitable problems arise. Apple and A&T have never ever claimed that there would be no activation problems or credit denials.

Any system, however perfect, will have problems when half a million users try to access it within one night. All some folks do is focus on the negative and whine.

Stop it, because it is getting tiring and unfair.

arn
Jul 2, 2007, 01:19 AM
It has only been 48 hours since the launch, and such a minor delay has caused these babies to cry and whine all over the place.
So stop blowing this out of proportion and stop focusing on all the negatives.

I think you underestimate the frustration of buying a $600 gadget and waiting 48 hours before using it.

arn

ajhill
Jul 2, 2007, 01:19 AM
2% activation problem, which is now improving? Sounds like Apple and ATT will be laughing all the way to the bank.

I was in an Apple store today (One that was sold out of iPhones!) and the place was PACKED. I have never seen that store so full. And it was one of the smaller, mall stores, not one of the massive flagship stores. There were a lot of people purchasing iMacs, Macbooks and iPods. Instead of focusing on the 2% that had trouble (most of which will be fixed soon, if not already fixed) maybe the "Experts" should consider all the sales from the huge number of iPhones sold, accessories, iPods, Macbooks, iMacs. Not to mention I would be willing to bet it was a record weekend for the iTunes Music Store! It's been a while since that was mentioned.

Of those I talked to who had problems a big issue was that they were long-term ATT customers. Meaning that they were ATT customers long ago, then got bought out by Cingular and then bought out by ATT again. Apparently those accounts were so old that the system had problems transferring the old accounts (read great deals that faithful customers didn't want to give up!)

The line around the iPhone demo table was two deep, all day long. And the iPhone seminar was full. The attendees were truely excited about this product.

Are there issues with this phone? Yes. Can most be addressed by an update? Certainly.

Do I care that I'm paying $20 instead of $60-80 for a 3G network? Absolutely not. EDGE is a challenge. I consistently get 200kbps out of it. Okay, but not too fast. But 3G has the same initial latency issues that EDGE has. So 3G web browsing isn't $60/month, or $1440 faster. I'll save that money for my next three iPhones in the coming years. 95% of the time I'm browsing with my iPhone I'm in range of broadband Wi-Fi, so I couldn't care less that I have to wait for 30 seconds for a webpage to load, that would load in 20 seconds if I paid a lot more per month. It just doesn't matter.

Count me in as a satisfied iPhone owner!

zgh1999
Jul 2, 2007, 01:23 AM
I think you underestimate the frustration of buying a $600 gadget and waiting 48 hours before using it.

arn

Arn:

Maybe.

But seriously, this whole thing has been blown way out of proportion.

It is all over the news network.

Apple has worked hard to bring this revolutionary product to the market, and now it gets rewarded with this whining over a small, not-unexpected problem?

Come on -- where is the fairness in all this?

Maybe Apple should not innovate and just do business like MS.

ajhill
Jul 2, 2007, 01:24 AM
right, estimate 250,000-500,000 iphones

2% = 5,000-10,000 people

The problem is 50% of the early adopters run a blog :) The other 50% post in forums...

arn

500,000 iPhones sold? I sure Apple & ATT will be crying all week as they count up the 1/3 of a billion dollars they took in this weekend. Not to mention that Apple will now have all those subscribers paying into the Apple coffers for the next 24 months. Can you say earnings growth?

Arn:

Maybe.

But seriously, this whole thing has been blown way out of proportion.

It is all over the news network.

Apple has worked hard to bring this revolutionary product to the market, and now it gets rewarded with this whining over a small, not-unexpected problem?

Come on -- where is the fairness in all this?

Maybe Apple should not innovate and just do business like MS.


Maybe you'll get lucky on Monday (it's a slow week considering the holiday in the middle of it) and spooked investors will take profit and put Apple shares on sale. This time next year you will be looking back and saying gee I wish I had bough AAPL back in 2007 when it was only $125 a share. Just as the people who didn't by AAPL last year at $55/share. Or those who didn't buy in 2005 at $35, or 2004 at $17. It's gone up 1000% in 5 years, Without the iPhone sales and subscription sharing revenue. What's not to love?

3Tabernacles
Jul 2, 2007, 01:44 AM
There seems to be an issue between the mouse and the chair!
This 2% propbably accounts for those who:

Do not read instructions.
Have bad credit and are stupid enough to try and then complain.
Theives
Have business accounts and never verified if the number would work.
And of maybe ATT's servers couldn't keep up with millions of buyers activating at the SAME time!


Hmmm, the last time I had my phone number ported over, it took weeks! I had to carry 2 cell phones around! Give me a break.

;)

JeffDM
Jul 2, 2007, 02:04 AM
Jeez. Have these folks ever ported a number before?

How often to people transfer their phone numbers? I really don't think it happens that often, and I suspect that only a minority of customers have actually done it. It's only been available for maybe two or three years, and that's about the length of a contract, and I don't think turnover is that great, last I heard, less than 12% a year. So that probably puts number transfers at less than a third of the mobile customer base.

While the news is slanted too far, the Apple fan conjecture in response is a bit much too.

mac jones
Jul 2, 2007, 02:07 AM
We live in an impatient fast-food society where we want instant gratification or we start to stress out.

What we need is a major power outage for an extended period to straighten the **** out.

cold turkey.

Of course it would perhaps, be a bit messy.

:D

Chosenbydestiny
Jul 2, 2007, 02:10 AM
That's actually a very good rate. 2% is definitely not something to go insane about. It took me a couple of days to transport over as well and I had the same problem, slightly more severe, when I bought a 700 dollar phone back two years ago. So I'm in the 2% crowd, and I understand that though things could have been so much worse... I wasn't very far from the best of it. Once again, I'm a happy apple customer. But If you're going to whine about it, you're in the wrong place. I believe they call it customer support...

Ampidire
Jul 2, 2007, 02:34 AM
Mine took 3 minutes to activate. New number, new contract, new phone.

I had it easy I guess. I also had my credit pre-approval number from the AT&T Store where I bought the phone in the first place.

I love it so far; freaking AWESOME!

HyperZboy
Jul 2, 2007, 02:43 AM
There seems to be an issue between the mouse and the chair!
This 2% propbably accounts for those who:

Do not read instructions.
Have bad credit and are stupid enough to try and then complain.
Theives
Have business accounts and never verified if the number would work.
And of maybe ATT's servers couldn't keep up with millions of buyers activating at the SAME time!


Hmmm, the last time I had my phone number ported over, it took weeks! I had to carry 2 cell phones around! Give me a break.

;)

Well, that's a pretty ridiculous statement as I don't fall into any of those categories and I still had activation problems.

And, I think I have a right to complain considering that the AT&T employees I dealt with were rude, unhelpful, & poorly trained and made it almost impossible for me to even purchase a $500 item which is still in stock in many stores. If they weren't completely incompetent, it seems to me that they would have been able to direct me to a store that had them or offered to order it for me directly from AT&T or be somewhat better organized. Not only did they not do that, they actually claimed the AT&T warehouses were out of stock and this is Friday at 8pm! Not to mention that they called over a security guard after I complained when the AT&T North Salisbury, Maryland manager had given the last iPhone in the store to the last person in line, his buddy!

Of course, I also had an activation delay (probably from my credit report being hit so many times within a 24hr period), but it was minor, only several hours. Once again I think this is an AT&T problem, not Apple's, although I do have multiple iTunes accounts, so that could have complicated things. I found it very difficult to update my iTunes account info so that the phone bill could be charged on the credit card that I wanted it on. Oh, and the AT&T people said my credit had been pre-approved (probably multiple times), but never offered the pre-approved credit number to me. Obviously there was no way for me to know to ask for this. Isn't this what they train people for?

By the way, the people at the Apple store were absolutely fantastic! There was none of the AT&T chaos and employees were helpful and courteous and they answered questions. Nor did I see an armed guard for intimidation purposes in the Apple store that I eventually purchased from.
What a different experience!

Obviously, all of this pales in comparison to world hunger so I do have perspective.

And yes, I love the phone (minus the slow AT&T EDGE network)

CrackedButter
Jul 2, 2007, 03:39 AM
In other important news:

I had a dream today where I thought I had an iPhone, I couldn't use it to make calls though because I live in the UK. I ended up showing people just the ipod functionality.

I didn't have any activation issues though. It was a good dream.

inkswamp
Jul 2, 2007, 03:59 AM
But seriously, this whole thing has been blown way out of proportion.

It is all over the news network.

Apple has worked hard to bring this revolutionary product to the market, and now it gets rewarded with this whining over a small, not-unexpected problem?

Come on -- where is the fairness in all this?

Maybe Apple should not innovate and just do business like MS.

Are you kidding? Why do you care about fairness for Apple but not for the customers? No customer gives a rip about how hard Apple worked when their end of the transaction isn't working--nor should they be expected to. See, Apple gets rewarded with cash that the customer has paid. They don't get kudos, but rather cash. And the customer gets... hmm... frustration, more waiting? You think people are blowing that out of proportion, that their lack of praise for Apple's hard work is somehow unfair? For $500, you get a pretty paperweight? I don't think that's blowing it out of proportion at all. People deserve what they pay for, what they were promised. I don't recall any "Activation may take up to 2 days" taglines at the end of those spiffy iPhone ads. Do you? No, I saw the promise of a seamless and well-designed gadget with an amazing interface. That's not what that 2% of iPhone customers got (so far) and they should be screaming about it.

I love Apple's products and their design is near flawless, but when they screw up, let's not cover for them. That's just embarrassing.

freediverdude
Jul 2, 2007, 04:01 AM
I do realize that porting over a number isn't instantaneous (I have done one of these), however, after reading through all the posts and blogs over the weekend, I do believe that AT&T just plain was not ready for this, and had not prepared correctly. AT&T should have taken the time to test different types of accounts to see how they would react in their system to this itunes activation process, and they clearly did not. Many many people who had discounts of different kinds who would not have thought those to be "business" accounts, people with old AT&T Wireless accounts as mentioned earlier, people who live in "partnered" coverage areas, all had problems and did not know what was going on, or could even reach somebody who could tell them. All this should have been tested and either software put in place to override the problems, or tell the customer service reps what to look for and steps to correct it. No excuse for some of that.

sethypoo
Jul 2, 2007, 04:01 AM
I agree, 2% (if that's true) isn't so bad. I think AT&T should have planned for this sort of rush. The fact that they're this under prepared makes me worry.

zgh1999
Jul 2, 2007, 04:02 AM
Are you kidding? Why do you care about fairness for Apple but not for the customers? No customer gives a rip about how hard Apple worked when their end of the transaction isn't working--nor should they be expected to. See, Apple gets rewarded with cash that the customer has paid. They don't get kudos, but rather cash. And the customer gets... hmm... frustration, more waiting? You think people are blowing that out of proportion? For $500, you get a pretty paperweight? I don't think that's blowing it out of proportion at all. People deserve what they pay for, what they were promised. I don't recall any "Activation may take up to 2 days" taglines at the end of those spiffy iPhone ads. Do you? No, I saw the promise of a seamless and well-designed gadget with an amazing interface. That's not what they customers got (so far) and they should be screaming about it.

I love Apple's products and their design is near flawless, but when they screw up, let's not cover for them. That's just embarrassing.

I am an Apple shareholder. I have a right to care.

Show me proof where Apple or AT&T stated that the activation would not be required or that it is guaranteed to go through within minutes.

Porting a number for ANY cell phone takes typically 1-2 days.

Stop your whining.

If you don't like the product or got a problem with Apple's choice of AT&T as the partner, feel free to return it.

No one is forcing you to do anything here.

inkswamp
Jul 2, 2007, 04:09 AM
Porting a number for ANY cell phone takes typically 1-2 days.

Stop your whining.

As has been pointed out, people not porting numbers are included in this 2%. Let's not rush in to be Apple apologists. I understand owning Apple stock is going to make you lean that way, but let's be fair. Apple and AT&T have botched activation a bit. They need to fix it. No excuses.

Oh, and next time you're at a fancy restaurant and the food takes 3-4 hrs to get to your table, just sit down and be quiet. Try to appreciate the care the chef is putting in to your food, the hard work he's doing. And don't bother the waitresses. They'll just want proof that you were promised it would be there earlier. :p

MrCrowbar
Jul 2, 2007, 04:18 AM
2% is good. Usually cell phones are a real pain to set up. Usually you do that in the store where the people barely know what they are doing...

When an Apple product has a few flaws on some models, it's usually blown out of proportions. Few people write in their blog how great their new Mac is. Well, actually they do but people having problems with it create whole websites, post on youtube etc...

For a while, it seemed like there was no working Macbook Pro out there if you believed the internet. Still, everyone I knew with one were happy with it. That's a problem you get when you're not using a cryptic product name like other companies do. If you google Macbook, you'll find way more results that when you search for a specific Dell Inspiron number-bla-bla-bla-randomLetter.

FYI: My Macbook has been to repairs quite a lot. Some things have been replaced twice, I had pretty much every known problem (random shutdown, heat, rainbow lines of doom, inverter board broken, trackpad button broken, blown up battery), some of them multiple times. They even f*cked up in the repairs (not putting it back together right, replacement topcase had half the keys not working, missing screws...). I just wasn't lucky. But hey, it's working now!

zgh1999
Jul 2, 2007, 04:18 AM
As has been pointed out, people not porting numbers are included in this 2%. Let's not rush in to be Apple apologists. I understand owning Apple stock is going to make you lean that way, but let's be fair. Apple and AT&T have botched activation a bit. They need to fix it. No excuses.

Oh, and next time you're at a fancy restaurant and the food takes 3-4 hrs to get to your table, just sit down and be quiet. Try to appreciate the care the chef is putting in to your food, the hard work he's doing. And don't bother the waitresses. They'll just want proof that you were promised it would be there earlier. :p

No one is saying Apple ought to be immunized from any criticism.

But look, taking an issue that affects 2% of the buyers of a product on a launch night where half a million other customers bought the same product and all simultaneously tried to get online to activate it, and then making the issue the sole characteristic of the iPhone -- to the point of overlooking and ignoring all the substantive merits of the iphone and its revolutionary features -- is simply unfair to Apple. Go ahead and blame the porting or activation or credit problems on Apple and AT&T and iPhone. Do what you want. It is all their fault and not your fault, because it sure sounds like everything is a negative just because things don't go your way.

Think all you want. You are welcome to return your iPhone if you dislike it or AT&T.

No one is forcing you to buy it or keep it.

avkills
Jul 2, 2007, 04:48 AM
Many of the 2% are grown men and women who act like little babies.

It has only been 48 hours since the launch, and such a minor delay has caused these babies to cry and whine all over the place.

Jeez. Have these folks ever ported a number before?

Again, this problem is inherent in any cell phone purchase/activation.

So why the fuzz?

Put it another way, had Apple or AT&T require all customers to activate their iPhones in store, you would likely have many many more people whining about the long lines and wait.

"Oh! It has been 7 hours and still not activated! I am pissed and angry!"
"This thing has no 3G and it is slow! I am disappointed!"

Give Apple and AT&T a break guys, and stop whining like it is the end of the world. You are lucky to have the chance to use the iPhone. No one is forcing you to buy it -- and Apple and AT&T have never claimed that there would be no activation delays.

So stop blowing this out of proportion and stop focusing on all the negatives.

Ok, 2% is not bad; but not everyone having activation issues were porting numbers. I've been with At&t/Cingular for over 10 years, and the one time I did get a new phone, it started working in 2 hours. My final solution for the iPhone was to go back to a At&t store and get a new SIM and re-do the activation which then took less than 1 minute. The store person had been instructed not to help me also, and also said he did not know how to change the SIM, luckily, online in the activation issues tread, we eventually all knew how to do it. My first attempt lasted 40+ hours...is that acceptable for a current customer, with a non business account, in good standing?

I think a lot of the complaining would have been alleviated if Apple had made the rest of the Phone operational even though it had not been activated for cellphone use. That is where I feel the major "bitch" is actually about. I know I would have been a lot less aggravated if I could have gone on to syncing, learning the interface, etc etc.

As a current long time customer (in good standing - no late payments), I felt like I was being treated like a nobody, which is quite disturbing.

I fail to see how we were giving Apple users a bad name; At&t and Apple should have made the proper precautions (ie server load testing) to insure when a **** load of people tried activating their phones, the servers would not crash. I personally feel my first attempt was queued into a server that eventually crashed, in which case my activation was probably never going to happen automatically. Not to mention the CS people had no way of accessing any information (so they say) without what they called a Web Activation number. Any time you make a closed system with only a single point of data fetching is just asking for trouble. I'm no rocket scientist and even I can get a clue about that.

But again, 2% is quite good, and I don't think anyone in that heated thread had any info as to just how many phones were trying to activate.

-mark

jonharris200
Jul 2, 2007, 04:59 AM
This story isn't about a 2% failure rate. It's about a 98% success rate - which to me seems kind of impressive for phone activations on such a massive scale.

Frisco
Jul 2, 2007, 05:32 AM
Yeah 98% should be considered very successful. Of course if you were one of the 2% I know it must be hard to look at it that way. Hopefully your phone is activated by now. It would be a nice gesture on Apple's part to send those with activation problems an iTunes gift card.

backspinner
Jul 2, 2007, 05:32 AM
Here in Europe, activating phones and porting numbers is sometimes a difficult process as well. And we have to pay extra for porting as well. And we have been doing this even for several years.

98% success rate is quite impressive for a weekend.

ortuno2k
Jul 2, 2007, 05:57 AM
Who we fooling?
This was bound to happen, come on. Does anyone remember when World of Warcraft came out, how unplayable it was because of how overcrowded the servers got?
I'd say that 2% is not bad at all.

thisonechance
Jul 2, 2007, 06:27 AM
Who we fooling?
This was bound to happen, come on. Does anyone remember when World of Warcraft came out, how unplayable it was because of how overcrowded the servers got?
I'd say that 2% is not bad at all.

Why is it that everything in life always comes back to World of Warcraft :D

On a serious note and frustrations aside, 2% is a pretty low failure rate. I think ATT did decent job preparing for launch. I have noticed a signal boost in my neighborhood in Chicago (now only if they would provide service in the subway tunnels).

You can not please everyone all the time. It is difficult enough to please Apple fans half the time.

Mac21ND
Jul 2, 2007, 06:42 AM
It all depends on how you spin it. If Apple or At&t came out with a press release that said, "98 percent of all users were activited online within 1-2 hours", it would be viewed as good news.

2 percent delays in activation, especially for an entirely new way of activating a phone, is great. Yeah, no delays would be optimal, but geez...

xterratop
Jul 2, 2007, 06:47 AM
I'm just happy that I didn't buy my phone right away. In fact, I'm not planning to get one until August of 2008 (thats when my Sprint contract expires). New technology concerns me although it does sound like the iPhone is really living up to its name. If I bought my phone now I know I'd be going through issues with activiation also. I guess its a common thing, eh?

Anyway, I'll be even happier to wait- who knows, Apply may come out with a newer version of the iPhone then. But until then, I'm just going to wait patiently.

:p

Lancetx
Jul 2, 2007, 06:50 AM
For those that did face activation delays, AT&T should come out and voluntarily waive the $36 activation fee as a gesture of good faith. Things like this are bound to happen when you have 500,000 or so people trying to activate a phone over a single weekend. However, that still doesn't make it fun for those customers that just spent $600 and are committing to a 2 year contract. AT&T could buy some good publicity for themselves by waiving those fees.

avkills
Jul 2, 2007, 06:58 AM
For those that did face activation delays, AT&T should come out and voluntarily waive the $36 activation fee as a gesture of good faith. Things like this are bound to happen when you have 500,000 or so people trying to activate a phone over a single weekend. However, that still doesn't make it fun for those customers that just spent $600 and are committing to a 2 year contract. AT&T could buy some good publicity for themselves by waiving those fees.

There is no fee if you are a current customer, what do I get. ;)

-mark

Lancetx
Jul 2, 2007, 07:04 AM
There is no fee if you are a current customer, what do I get. ;)

Well, there is no reason they can't give a $36 service credit to the account of an existing customer that had iPhone activation problems as well. :)

whooleytoo
Jul 2, 2007, 07:09 AM
I think you underestimate the frustration of buying a $600 gadget and waiting 48 hours before using it.

arn

Exactly!

People who buy a new gadget on its launch weekend (hell, people who queue up for days beforehand!) aren't exactly the 'patient' type!

Spending that kind of money and not being able to use it is annoying. Potentially being without a phone is pretty inconvenient too.

twoodcc
Jul 2, 2007, 07:18 AM
well, mine took about 7 hours to activate. but at least it did. and i had to call to get my data plan and voicemail right

wp0303
Jul 2, 2007, 07:21 AM
38 hours after starting the activation, I finally found an ATT employee who recognized the problem and at least told me how to resolve it before having to wait for another hour on hold for customer service. His explanation was that I had been an ATT customer prior to their merger with Cingular and now was hung up in their system. That is clearly ATT's lack of preparation and further lack of training for the 7 or 8 representatives I spoke to during the wait. Since it took minutes from my finally speaking to an "activation specialist" for the phone to start working, it would seem that this problem could have been resolved promptly.

Having expected a relatively easy activation (I was an ATT customer with a number and good credit history, had Mac OS 10.4.10, iTunes 7.3), I was frustrated compounded by the (mis)statement in the on-line PDF manual that the features of the phone other than making calls would be functional during activation, which was not the case and that is Apple's fault.

I am very used to being an early adopter, from my 1977 Apple II to my Mac 128K to the first MacIntel system and have no illusions about the perfection of newly introduced products. I am also prepared to wait for resolution of issues, but expect a reasonable committment from the vendor side. I think that ATT should have been much better prepared for what could easily have been predicted to be an onslaught and I think Apple could have made the device functional during the activation process.

dreamscuba
Jul 2, 2007, 07:28 AM
For those of us in the telecoms industry, this is very normal. 2% is very small in comparison to a lot of mobile product launches.
However, a wise telco would know that this would happen and plan accordingly before the event to be prepared as opposed to panic afterwards.

For those of us in Asia...we have the longest wait for activation!!

zorinlynx
Jul 2, 2007, 07:34 AM
What I don't get is...

WHY is the phone a brick prior to activation?

Perhaps people would be less upset if they could use the non-phone features, such as the iPod part, before activating.

What reason is there to tie a feature that doesn't need the network, to the network?

This actually concerns me a bit; does the iPod part of the phone NEED the cel network for some reason?

I've resisted getting an iPhone until certain features are available, but this is all unnerving. It seems to be full of artificial and unnecessary restrictions that really shouldn't be on a $600 device with NO freaking subsidy.

Hmac
Jul 2, 2007, 07:43 AM
Ok, 2% is not bad; but not everyone having activation issues were porting numbers.


No...many of them had bad credit (or maybe only mistakenly appeared to have bad credit - Equifax screws up pretty regularly) or a not-allowed business account, , or a family plan, or some screwy Cingular legacy account, or a dunce trying to activate it, or they didn't read the activation requirments, or they didn't have iTunes 7.3, or they were trying to use 10.3.9.

So we have Apple trying to effect, on a mass scale, the implementation of a very complicated device, that, for the first time, relies on a notoriously cumbersome company (AT&T) in an industry that it not reputed to be particularly customer-friendly, and whose underpinnings are closely regulated by a US governmental agency. What a recipe for disaster.

So many variables and potential pitfalls...then throw in the 300,000 iPhone-obsessors that have been posting all of these "I can't wait for the iPhone" threads here all trying with trembling fingers to get their new toy up and running all in the same 24 hour period. Now, Apple not only has to worry about their hardware, but also the system and customer base that AT&T created. Then, for 2%, it doesn't work and the righteous anger of the classic disappointed Apple fan-boy hits the internet full-force. Complete with the usual calls for class-action suits. And, as usual, the media jumps in and fans the flames because the now have an opportunity to trash two of their favorite targets - Apple Computer and a giant cell-phone company. Boy, this whole thing is absolutely classic.

pale9
Jul 2, 2007, 08:03 AM
i activated my iphone on friday. the confirmation said the number port would be completed in 6 hours. well, it was not completed, nor were there any useful messages when i got up this morning, 3 days later! i could make outbound calls, however. att does NOT have customer service staff on sundays, can you believe that! so this morning a called customer service. after a 15 min. wait i spoke to a lady who was instantly able to activate my phone for incoming calls.

BTW, i am on the gophone plan. a further annoyance is that att has several similar, yet differnet portals for their wireless customers. trying to log on to a 'wrong' one made me change my password, but still never let me check my account.

these are all the same problems (incompetence?) that made me leave att years ago to switch to sprint.

Diode
Jul 2, 2007, 08:21 AM
Mine took 7 hours to activate ... the only thing that made me angry was being left without a cell phone. I just whish they had warned me or something ... then I could have done it before bed instead of before I went out for the evening.

Oh well my frustration was forgotten when I got home to find a activated iphone :p

33scottie33
Jul 2, 2007, 08:35 AM
I activated my iPhone at 11pm Saturday night and they are still working on it.:eek:

When I called this morning, I was told that the port attempt was cancelled. I was also told that when putting in my Verizon account number, I should have left off the dash and remaining numbers. They said that that has been causing a lot of problems.

pale9
Jul 2, 2007, 08:41 AM
I activated my iPhone at 11pm Saturday night and they are still working on it.:eek:

When I called this morning, I was told that the port attempt was cancelled. I was also told that when putting in my Verizon account number, I should have left off the dash and remaining numbers. They said that that has been causing a lot of problems.

as a programmer i would say that that is obviously bad coding and not the fault of the CUSTOMER!

ajhill
Jul 2, 2007, 08:42 AM
I activated my iPhone at 11pm Saturday night and they are still working on it.:eek:

When I called this morning, I was told that the port attempt was cancelled. I was also told that when putting in my Verizon account number, I should have left off the dash and remaining numbers. They said that that has been causing a lot of problems.

You didn't expect Verizon and T-Mobile to just let their customers got without a fight, did you? Cell phone companies are notorious for dragging their feet as much as possible when you try to move your service to another carrier.

Try this experiment, call you cable company and tell them that you want to terminate your cable because you are going to satellite? See if they don't offer you a discount or two to stay.

Those who I heard about having problems either had REALLY old accounts, or other carriers and were waiting for their other carriers to give up the ghost.

AtariAge
Jul 2, 2007, 09:06 AM
I can't believe I'm seeing people here get MAD about people describing their difficulty in getting their new $500/600 phone activated. If you're a stockholder in Apple or AT&T and the stock takes a hit because of the news now circulating, your beef should be with APPLE and AT&T, *not* the people who were affected by their poor planning! Seriously, do you just want it swept under the rug as if nothing happened? Because that certainly would not encourage them to anticipate these types of problems in the future. Perhaps with all the negative publicity and a stock hit they'll sit up and take notice.

I am one of the individuals hit by this snafu, and it took me nearly 40 hours and quite a few phone calls to AT&T to get the matter resolved. Had I *NOT* called, I'm pretty confident that I'd still be sitting here with a glorified paperweight. In my case, I was an old "blue" AT&T Wireless (pre-Cingular) customer, and my ancient plan was not compatible with the iPhone. This is a case that affected many people, and was obviously not programmed into the iTunes activation scenario. As an AT&T customer of about 10 years, I was pretty miffed about how long it was taking to activate, and I was left without a working phone as my old phone had already been deactivated and my new iPhone SIM would *not* work in the old phone (since it was pre-Cingular). This scenario put many people in a bind--what if this was your only phone? What if an emergency occurred and you were unable to make a phone call to 911 as a result?

AT&T and Apple had at least six months (and likely many more) to prepare for the iPhone launch. I don't believe it was a question of capacity--I believe that AT&T did not properly prepare in terms of all the various cases that might cause problems (legacy "Blue" customers, Business customers, customers with discounts on their existing plans, etc.), and then became overwhelmed when these cases were all rejected by the iTunes registration.

And if you truly believe the "only 2% of customers had problems" quote, I have a bridge to sell you. I bet it was significantly higher than that.

Also keep in mind that the people who stood in line to buy one of the first iPhones are the people you want to be damn sure that you appease. It is these people who are your staunchest fans--the people who preach the Apple brand and help spread the brand by word of mouth. Being unprepared for the problems encountered has left a bad taste in the mouths of these people, and in the future they may not be so quick to recommend Apple to their friends, family, and strangers.

..Al

shawnce
Jul 2, 2007, 09:27 AM
I feel for the folks that got hit by an activation issue...

I was an existing AT&T customer with a employer discount rate that was still on my phone from when I worked at HP. iTunes informed me that I would be losing this discounted rate (which I shouldn't have still had anyways) and once I acknowledged that activation took around 3 minutes if not less (wasn't watching the phone).

I can well image that AT&T has an ugly account system with a mix of account from various source thanks to the company mergers, etc. I am not surprised if some accounts got in a bad state as a result and only now did the issue get exposed. Also I know the folks in the AT&T stores have also screwed up my account before (also happened at Sprint).

The reality many of the account management systems SUCK and the training of employees can SUCK as well (turnover in call centers also sucks which contributes to poor level of experience).

I hope AT&T and Apple correct issues quickly and I would love to see them credit some time, etc. to those accounts affected.

One annoyance I have at the moment is that I can't get my account information from AT&T because their website keeps saying system problems are preventing it. So at the moment I don't know exactly what my calling plan looks like (forgot what I had on the account I xfered to my iPhone). Also iTunes doesn't appear to list this information... I wish it did... I would love to have something like an iTunes interface for my AT&T cellular account.

ajhill
Jul 2, 2007, 09:28 AM
Why is it that everything in life always comes back to World of Warcraft :D

On a serious note and frustrations aside, 2% is a pretty low failure rate. I think ATT did decent job preparing for launch. I have noticed a signal boost in my neighborhood in Chicago (now only if they would provide service in the subway tunnels).

You can not please everyone all the time. It is difficult enough to please Apple fans half the time.


I heard a rumor that Steve Baumer was complaining because the iPhone didn't run World of Warcraft, no will want the iPhone ;)

But, seriously the Los Angeles Times is reporting 525,000 units sold!

Holy Cow, the most optimistic, over the top "Grand Slam" estimates last week were for 400,000 and you're telling me that they beat it by 100k units? It's amazing they got 98% activated.

wardrobe
Jul 2, 2007, 09:38 AM
Look at this:

Time Magazine: Most Influential Gadgets and Gizmos (http://www.time.com/time/specials/2007/article/0,28804,1638782_1638778,00.html)

Note that a full third of them are Apple gadgets: mac, newton, ipod and... iphone.

newstudentut
Jul 2, 2007, 10:06 AM
I can't believe I'm seeing people here get MAD about people describing their difficulty in getting their new $500/600 phone activated.

..Al

It's the Apple fans that adore anything the companies does. Their comments sometimes are so blinded; Apple can do no wrong, Apple's perfect.

dagrouch
Jul 2, 2007, 10:10 AM
I've kept up with various forums since the launch and it's mostly been negative. So many posts about how Apple and at&t suck because of the activation. My gut feeling was that these people were in the minority and this article somewhat confirms that:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070702/tc_nm/apple_dc_1

Only 2% of an estimated 500k which is 1000. Just goes to show that you can't rely on anecdotal evidence to base purchasing decisions.

mickeyd26
Jul 2, 2007, 10:32 AM
I was one of the 2% of iPhone customers who experienced "activation issues". I for one think that some of you should feel some sympathy. If you had waited hours in line and paid $600 plus tax, then come home to find that you couldn't use your iPhone for 36-48 hours... you'd be pissed off as well. For those 36-48, my iPhone was a lovely useless uber expensive paperweight. Sure, some issues are to be expected, but AT&T and Apple had ample time to upgrade their systems to ensure a smooth activation process. AT&T CS reps were claiming "that we weren't expecting this and our systems are currently overwhelmed"... *************~! They had six months to prepare.

I don't know, I just feel that AT&T started off on the wrong foot with ALOT of iPhone consumers. I know that all my other friends had activation issues as well. So I'm not sure if I believe that the percentage was really 2%... Just my opinion FWIW... :apple:

lazyrighteye
Jul 2, 2007, 10:34 AM
FWIW, I was one of the 98% that activated my ihonoe in under 10 minutes.
From the transaction at the Aspen Grove Appel Store in CO, to the activation: not a single misstep or hitch.

A brilliant experience, for me.
And yes - most people post complaints.
When things are working as advertised, it is less likely people will post a "this is great" message. So take that into consideration.
If readers judged Apple from forums, no one would ever buy anything because A. they either don't work or B. something better is coming out next Tuesday.

Concerning the iPhone: it's an absolute dream.
And no review can do this device justice. You simply have to touch it, use it.
And my guess is you would then buy it.

shawnce
Jul 2, 2007, 10:35 AM
I don't know, I just feel that AT&T started off on the wrong foot with ALOT of iPhone consumers. I know that all my other friends had activation issues as well. So I'm not sure if I believe that the percentage was really 2%... Just my opinion FWIW... :apple: It would be interesting to see what you and your friends have in common that may have run you into an activation issue.

FWIW all of my friends didn't have any activation issues... well one took 2 hours to transfer a number from IIRC Sprint to AT&T/iPhone.

Mac21ND
Jul 2, 2007, 10:45 AM
I can't believe I'm seeing people here get MAD about people describing their difficulty in getting their new $500/600 phone activated. If you're a stockholder in Apple or AT&T and the stock takes a hit because of the news now circulating, your beef should be with APPLE and AT&T, *not* the people who were affected by their poor planning! Seriously, do you just want it swept under the rug as if nothing happened? Because that certainly would not encourage them to anticipate these types of problems in the future. Perhaps with all the negative publicity and a stock hit they'll sit up and take notice.

I am one of the individuals hit by this snafu, and it took me nearly 40 hours and quite a few phone calls to AT&T to get the matter resolved. Had I *NOT* called, I'm pretty confident that I'd still be sitting here with a glorified paperweight. In my case, I was an old "blue" AT&T Wireless (pre-Cingular) customer, and my ancient plan was not compatible with the iPhone. This is a case that affected many people, and was obviously not programmed into the iTunes activation scenario. As an AT&T customer of about 10 years, I was pretty miffed about how long it was taking to activate, and I was left without a working phone as my old phone had already been deactivated and my new iPhone SIM would *not* work in the old phone (since it was pre-Cingular). This scenario put many people in a bind--what if this was your only phone? What if an emergency occurred and you were unable to make a phone call to 911 as a result?

AT&T and Apple had at least six months (and likely many more) to prepare for the iPhone launch. I don't believe it was a question of capacity--I believe that AT&T did not properly prepare in terms of all the various cases that might cause problems (legacy "Blue" customers, Business customers, customers with discounts on their existing plans, etc.), and then became overwhelmed when these cases were all rejected by the iTunes registration.

And if you truly believe the "only 2% of customers had problems" quote, I have a bridge to sell you. I bet it was significantly higher than that.

Also keep in mind that the people who stood in line to buy one of the first iPhones are the people you want to be damn sure that you appease. It is these people who are your staunchest fans--the people who preach the Apple brand and help spread the brand by word of mouth. Being unprepared for the problems encountered has left a bad taste in the mouths of these people, and in the future they may not be so quick to recommend Apple to their friends, family, and strangers.

..Al

Al, with all due respect, the snafu you've described is what can happen at any cell phone company and with any cell phone. I use Verizon and needed to have my phone number changed. When they changed the phone number, they forgot to switch over or enable other stand things too such as voice mail. Was I annoyned? Yeah. It was inconvienent to have to call Verizon customer service and say "hey, um, you forgot to do ____." But sometimes that's what happens.

I think Apple and At&t were as prepared as they could be given the unusual demand the iPhone launch placed on their network and staff. People will recommend the iPhone to their friends and family based on what the iPhone does, NOT based on a few hangup's with activation. "Yeah, I few problems getting it activated, but the phone's sweet! Check this out..."

I'm not trying to diminish your concerns, I'm sure your frustrations are genuine. But I might suggest keeping it in perspective to the other 98 percent who may have had a perfect experience.

ajhill
Jul 2, 2007, 10:49 AM
News agencies here on the left coast are reporting iPhone sales for the first weekend at 525,000 to 675,000 units. At an average of $575/phone (A lot more 8Gb phones were made and stocked) that's $316,250,000 to $388,125,00 in sales in the first weekend.

Now for the Amazing part... CNBC took apart an iPhone and found out tha Apple's profit margin on the iPhone is 50%. Yes of that 1/3 of a Billion dollars, 1/2 was profit for Apple (less a commission for the iPhones sold at ATT stores). At 50% profit is there any wonder why the Apple stores got Soooo many more phones?

And don't forget home gamers, Apple gets a kickback for every subscriber, for each month that the subscriber uses their iPhone. How much? $1, $2, $3??? No body knows. The only thing we know for sure is that Steve Jobs recently showed interest in purchasing a 265 foot Yacht. I guess he can afford it.

Apple is on track to make more profit this summer than all the Hollywood blockbusters combined. Those movie studio could only drool over a 50% profit margin. Wow!

iwitch
Jul 2, 2007, 11:13 AM
I too had a pretty good experience. I went to the Apple Store around 8 p.m. on Friday, walked right in, got an iPhone, went home and updated my mini, activated it and everything worked right away except the phone number. Phone calls went to my old phone while I waited for the number to port. It took about 24 hours which is actually what I thought it would take. 6 hours seemed like a low estimate to me for Sprint to release me and for AT&T to pick me up. The iTunes process took mere minutes. I'm really pleased with the phone and satisfied with my turn around time. I would imagine that if I stood in line or was already an AT&T customer, I might be a little pissed too if I had been waiting days for activation.

pieman02
Jul 2, 2007, 11:18 AM
I agree, 2% (if that's true) isn't so bad. I think AT&T should have planned for this sort of rush. The fact that they're this under prepared makes me worry.

What about last Christmas when so many people got iTunes giftcards Christmas day the server was too busy to log in pretty often...I don't think it is a matter of under-preparing but there is only so much information and processing that can happen all at the same time

AtariAge
Jul 2, 2007, 11:18 AM
I think Apple and At&t were as prepared as they could be given the unusual demand the iPhone launch placed on their network and staff. People will recommend the iPhone to their friends and family based on what the iPhone does, NOT based on a few hangup's with activation. "Yeah, I few problems getting it activated, but the phone's sweet! Check this out..."
I don't agree--the cases that seemed to affect many people (that I described in my post above) certainly could have been anticipated and dealt with inside the iTunes activation procedure. This probably would have staved off most of the issues. Instead, people had to deal with completely clueless AT&T and Apple CSRs in attempts to get their phone to work, and only about 36+ hours after the phones went on sale did the AT&T reps finally become responsive and able to get these phones activated.

I'm not trying to diminish your concerns, I'm sure your frustrations are genuine. But I might suggest keeping it in perspective to the other 98 percent who may have had a perfect experience.
Again, I seriously doubt this issue only affected 2%, I would take that figure with a huge grain of salt.

AT&T and Apple could have gone a long way towards alleviating concerns for those who were waiting. They could have sent emails to those affected stating that, yes, there are problems and we are working on them as quickly as we can, we apologize for the delay. They could have made public statements to the effect. They could have offered some type of compensation for those affected (a free month's service, waiving of the $36 activation fee, anything). They did none of these things, and even today they simply made excuses for the problems ("servers were overloaded") without apologizing to those who had issues. It also would have helped if they were not so quick to deactivate old phones, leaving people without a cell phone for hours (or days) before their iPhone was activated.

..Al

zgh1999
Jul 2, 2007, 11:28 AM
I don't agree--the cases that seemed to affect many people (that I described in my post above) certainly could have been anticipated and dealt with inside the iTunes activation procedure. This probably would have staved off most of the issues. Instead, people had to deal with completely clueless AT&T and Apple CSRs in attempts to get their phone to work, and only about 36+ hours after the phones went on sale did the AT&T reps finally become responsive and able to get these phones activated.


Again, I seriously doubt this issue only affected 2%, I would take that figure with a huge grain of salt.

AT&T and Apple could have gone a long way towards alleviating concerns for those who were waiting. They could have sent emails to those affected stating that, yes, there are problems and we are working on them as quickly as we can, we apologize for the delay. They could have made public statements to the effect. They could have offered some type of compensation for those affected (a free month's service, waiving of the $36 activation fee, anything). They did none of these things, and even today they simply made excuses for the problems ("servers were overloaded") without apologizing to those who had issues. It also would have helped if they were not so quick to deactivate old phones, leaving people without a cell phone for hours (or days) before their iPhone was activated.

..Al

And how would the supposed problem you described differ from the activation or porting of ANY other cell phones?

It is very usual, and is in fact expected, for activation and porting of cell phones to take days.

It is not a problem to begin with, and even it were a problem, it is certainly not specific to Apple or AT&T.

princigalli
Jul 2, 2007, 12:27 PM
I don't see why they should be having any problems at all. When I buy a SIM card in Italy it will work instantly. No complications required. ATT sucks and this is one more proof. I don't know why Apple is teaming up with such bandits to sell their Iphone.

I still remember on september 11 after the terrorist attack a friend of mine in Rome wanted to call someone in NY to see if he was OK. He called ATT to have a directory inquiry (he was in office and the number was at home) but they refused to help unless he had a credit card handy to pay for the service. I think that in such an emergency situation ATT should have been more cooperative and not so greedy.

I feel sorry for people that got their Iphones at ATT stored instead of Apple stores since I read reports of ATT salesmen threatening not to see the phones unless customers would also get 2 gadgets for it. That's really low.

TyleRomeo
Jul 2, 2007, 12:43 PM
I have been trying to activate my phone since 8PM on Friday night. It's just past 1:30PM on Monday. I'm going on over 60 hours to activate my phone. I am not porting a number. I am just a new customer to AT&T who canceled his Verizon account and just wants a new number. That aparently is very hard to do for AT&T. I have spent over 6 hours on the phone with them and still have no clear answers. I wonder if I would not have called if they would ever contact me with an email or phone call to how to activate my phone. STILL the worst experience ever with a apple product and I'm a fanboy all the way but this has soured my taste a lot. I have no idea what I am supposed to do now.

inkswamp
Jul 2, 2007, 01:12 PM
You are welcome to return your iPhone if you dislike it or AT&T.

No one is forcing you to buy it or keep it.

I have no idea why you keep assuming I've bought an iPhone. I didn't. I hate cell phones and I have no plans to buy an iPhone. However, I tend to err on the side of customers when it comes to this kind of thing and, as much as I like their products, Apple is not above that. I don't think people shelling out $500+ for any product should take this Apple's-way-or-the-highway approach you think they should. I don't think that's fair minded at all, and I think the whole issue of whether 2% is reasonable for this is irrelevant.

vickj
Jul 2, 2007, 01:14 PM
I was one of the people who couldn't get activated. Answer to your first question... it wound up taking me six hours. The problem was that, for some unknown reason, they had the expiration date of my credit card set to the year 3011. IMHO, if I hadn't called (see below), I'd still be waiting. I started the process at 2pm Saturday, got the email at 8.50 pm (Pacific Time).

My problem with it is the customer service angle. For years now, companies have been targeted by their shareholders to reduce expenses, and customer service (or tech support, if you will) has been a good target to allow these folks to get an extra 2 or 3 cents a share so they can buy a bigger boat. When I have problems with a product, I expect to be able to get ahold of someone at the company who can solve my problem. I expect that the time needed to talk to a representative will be reasonable, and that the person I get will be able to actually help me.

If you will allow me a moment of curmudgeonliness... that's how it was up until 15-20 years ago...

My experience: I bought at the ATT store, I had them run my credit and was approved on the spot, I was activating a new line, new ATT customer, and not porting a number - the profile of someone who should have no problems. Then I got the dreaded 'Wait till we get around to you' message. I called Apple, who sent me to ATT, who sent me to another number at Apple, who sent me to a different number at ATT, etc. I bounced around for a while until I got a lady at ATT who spent an hour on the phone with me doing a manual activation (and she deserves unlimited praise and another week of vacation). Which didn't work. She confirmed that my account was set up, was able to reach the number, but my phone was still saying 'Please activate'. She said to contact ATT Customer Service to finish it up.

So I called. And they were *CLOSED*. And so was Apple. Now you mean to tell me I should be all lovey-dovey forgiving to a company who just sold 250000 - 500000 of these things in 1.5 days and they can't be bothered to add some extra staff for a day or two to help out the people who are giving them large piles of cash?

[set soapbox = on]

So, in light of this, you can't tell me that I should cut some slack to two companies (mostly ATT, but Apple has some responsibility here) who have been hyping this thing for months, run off an extremely large number of product so they can supply the product to anyone who wants one, and then be as ill-prepared as they were. In addition, when the problem came up, they didn't take adequate measures to solve it. There are two possibilities here: either the people running the show were incredibly stupid (in which case they should never again have a job more complex than making french fries) or they didn't want to spend the money, which is more likely. And that just shows contempt to me as a customer.

C'mon, people... have some higher standards. They will keep getting away with this s#%$#@ as long as you let them. People who show contempt for me don't deserve my good will...

[set soapbox = off]

avkills
Jul 2, 2007, 01:23 PM
News agencies here on the left coast are reporting iPhone sales for the first weekend at 525,000 to 675,000 units. At an average of $575/phone (A lot more 8Gb phones were made and stocked) that's $316,250,000 to $388,125,00 in sales in the first weekend.

Now for the Amazing part... CNBC took apart an iPhone and found out tha Apple's profit margin on the iPhone is 50%. Yes of that 1/3 of a Billion dollars, 1/2 was profit for Apple (less a commission for the iPhones sold at ATT stores). At 50% profit is there any wonder why the Apple stores got Soooo many more phones?

And don't forget home gamers, Apple gets a kickback for every subscriber, for each month that the subscriber uses their iPhone. How much? $1, $2, $3??? No body knows. The only thing we know for sure is that Steve Jobs recently showed interest in purchasing a 265 foot Yacht. I guess he can afford it.

Apple is on track to make more profit this summer than all the Hollywood blockbusters combined. Those movie studio could only drool over a 50% profit margin. Wow!

And I am sure the multi-touch software interface was a breeze to program also. ;) Keep in mind that a phone OS pretty much has to be solid.

-mark

whooleytoo
Jul 2, 2007, 01:30 PM
Apple is on track to make more profit this summer than all the Hollywood blockbusters combined. Those movie studio could only drool over a 50% profit margin. Wow!

The iPhone revenue is being recorded over two years; thus Apple are less likely to have one sensational quarter because of it.

It does bode very well for Apple's quarterlies for the next two years! ;)

jbernie
Jul 2, 2007, 06:11 PM
1) It doesn't matter whose fault it is, it makes BOTH at&t and apple look bad, and having two people to blame makes it worse, apple blames at&t and they in turn blame apple while the end user who is up for $2000 over two years is left with a bad taste in their mouth.

2) As to response times, yeah with so many people needing to activiate their new device it will cause issues, so why weren't at&t and apple ready for this? They hyped the product beyond belief and then didn't get their servers ready to accept what they new was going to be a heavy volume of requests.

Some users will just be unreasonable in their expectations, and of course the ones who scream loudest get all the attention, but also in hyping the product, the media was looking really close at everything going on so they were just itching for issues to happen.

There really isn't one specific group who can take all the blame, but ultimately if the end user experience is very poor then all parties take the blame no matter what.

The end users expectation will be similar to buying a new car, if you buy the el cheapo model and something isn't perfect you get what you paid for, if you go and buy the top of the range car, you expect it to just work. Go buy a Lexus or BMW or the like and have it break down on you on the way home from the dealer and then be told the car you spent so much money on wont work properly for a few weeks.

Given the large volume of requests handled I think they did a pretty fair job, but at the same time, there is no such thing as being over prepared.

blybug
Jul 2, 2007, 06:21 PM
I was reading this thread this afternoon prior to my iPhone purchase (which itself took 9 minutes at the Friendswood, TX Apple Store...delayed by about 4 minutes only because I was using an Apple Gift Card and a tax-exempt number). Funny when I told my non-techie-couldn't-care-less-about-the-latest-gadget wife I was going to go ahead and get one, she said, "Are you sure, I heard on the news that they aren't working, people can't make calls or get them activated." Aarrghh.

I timed the activation process start to finish, from the time I got home and plopped the iPhone into the dock until I was activated as a new AT&T wireless customer through iTunes.

4:21

Now I'm just waiting for my iPhone playlist (1000 songs) to sync, which is taking substantially longer. I want to cancel the process and start playing, but CoverFlow will be more fun with more albums...:rolleyes:

chatin
Jul 2, 2007, 07:34 PM
A news.com reporter was delayed 13 hours for his activation. It seems there are credit check issues with some of the phones. I wasn't in the coverage area for AT&T so I didn't give Apple my SS#... yet! :eek:

ckinyc
Jul 3, 2007, 03:45 PM
I started the activation process on Friday 9pm and now is Tue 4:39pm and my t-mobile numebr still hasn't been ported to my iPhone. I was on the phone with AT&T people for endless hours (mostly waiting) in the first two days. And now I have a specialist and she calls me (or txt me) to give me updates. That's very nice of AT&T but they still couldn't figure out what the problem really is. I don't feel upset anymore I guess I found a "better place" so of speak. As long as I know they are working on it I am OK with it. It will work eventually. I hope!