PDA

View Full Version : Just saw the USS Kitty Hawk sail into town


AlBDamned
Jul 4, 2007, 10:02 PM
Wow! What a monster! I've rarely seen a navy ship up close and I felt like I was in spitting distance of this one. Watching the tugs straing to keep it from smashing into Russell Crowe's house was pretty interesting!

[Link (http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2007/07/05/1183351338991.html?from=top5)]

samh004
Jul 4, 2007, 10:16 PM
Couldn't they of let it hit his house, he's not important.

When I was younger (think 1996) my parents were given tickets for a tour of an aircraft carrier in Hong Kong. It was great fun actually being on a real aircraft carrier. HUGE ship.

USS Independence
CV-62

AlBDamned
Jul 4, 2007, 10:21 PM
Couldn't they of let it hit his house, he's not important.

LOL that would have been amusing.


When I was younger (think 1996) my parents were given tickets for a tour of an aircraft carrier in Hong Kong. It was great fun actually being on a real aircraft carrier.

They're not letting people on it this time round, which is hardly surprising at the moment given everything that's going on. It was MASSIVE though. And the number of aircraft on the deck was amazing too. Up until now I'd only ever seen stuff like this in films.

Four other ships are expected in too.

Was pretty cool, I watched it come in then walked back past Sydney Opera House and the Bridge, all in blazing (and warm) winter sunshine. Makes me pleased to be here!

Keebler
Jul 4, 2007, 10:27 PM
LOL that would have been amusing.



They're not letting people on it this time round, which is hardly surprising at the moment given everything that's going on. It was MASSIVE though. And the number of aircraft on the deck was amazing too. Up until now I'd only ever seen stuff like this in films.

Four other ships are expected in too.

Was pretty cool, I watched it come in then walked back past Sydney Opera House and the Bridge, all in blazing (and warm) winter sunshine. Makes me pleased to be here!

did you not take pictures to share with us???

i'm jealous

iSaint
Jul 4, 2007, 10:42 PM
[redneck voice]us 'mericans just tryin' to make sure y'alls keepin' it straight down under[/redneck voice]


;) :D

kalisphoenix
Jul 4, 2007, 10:44 PM
I was wondering why yo mama left in such a hurry.

AlBDamned
Jul 4, 2007, 10:45 PM
did you not take pictures to share with us???

i'm jealous

Nope, sadly not. I wasn't planning to go as I couldn't stand there all day so didn't take a camera into work. Then, the dimwits in the Australian Harbor/Naval watch let slip the times even though the US had asked them not too, so I managed to take an early lunch and walk the 10 minutes to the dock. I'll be going back at the weekend for a closer look and to take some pics.

There's this picture from anther person and more on SMH (http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/sydney-says-a-big-here-kitty/2007/07/05/1183351338991.html). Loads of Helicopters watching over it, police boats, Naval authorities etc. it's a pretty big occassion by all accounts.

Found a round up of number on the ship too:
- Flight deck area: 4.1 acres
- Maximum number of aircraft: 75
- Average crew number: 5300
- Average number of lawyers on board: two
- Number of loaves of bread baked each day: more than 900
- Average amount of soft drink consumed per day: 5040 cans
- Average number of meals served per day: more than 12,000
- Number of barbershops: two
- Number of retail shops: two
- Number of hospital beds: 65
- Number of doctors and surgeons: seven
- Average amount of mail processed each day: 1125kg
- Average annual payroll: $US145 million ($169 million)

mattscott306
Jul 4, 2007, 10:45 PM
I went on a tour of a floating museum of a world war II aircraft carrier. It was rather large itself, I couldn't imagine seeing the kitty hawk in person.

zioxide
Jul 4, 2007, 10:53 PM
That thing is ****ing huge. What's more amazing is that the USS Kitty Hawk is the smallest carrier in our fleet.

AlBDamned
Jul 4, 2007, 11:00 PM
That thing is ****ing huge. What's more amazing is that the USS Kitty Hawk is the smallest carrier in our fleet.

Yeah but it's nearly 50 years old! (The new ones do look amazing though.) It's pretty rusty in places, but it was still an amazing sight. Especially all the aircraft.

kalisphoenix
Jul 4, 2007, 11:34 PM
I went on a tour of a floating museum of a world war II aircraft carrier. It was rather large itself, I couldn't imagine seeing the kitty hawk in person.

Maybe the USS Yorktown, near Charleston, South Carolina? My grandfather helped build it and my father did some ventilation work on it. When I arrived at the Naval Nuclear Power Training Command, one of the first things our class did as a group was take a tour of it. A female in the group, whose name I can't recall, gave handjobs to two of my classmates during the tour.

Counterfit
Jul 4, 2007, 11:35 PM
Last of its kind, the only conventionally fueled carrier in the US fleet. And if you thought that one was big, you should see a Nimitz class. :eek:

I've been on the USS Intrepid (CV-11), and it was pretty cool to see an A-12 (which spawned the SR-71) on board


^ The Intrepid is also a floating museum, just not right now.
That whore! :p

AlBDamned
Jul 4, 2007, 11:48 PM
When I arrived at the Naval Nuclear Power Training Command, one of the first things our class did as a group was take a tour of it. A female in the group, whose name I can't recall, gave handjobs to two of my classmates during the tour.

LOL, I guess you need some sort of relief from the 85 hours of study per week (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Nuclear_Power_School)?

AlBDamned
Jul 4, 2007, 11:52 PM
Here are the successors to the Nimitz class.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_R._Ford_class_aircraft_carrier

mad jew
Jul 4, 2007, 11:57 PM
- Average crew number: 5300
- Average amount of soft drink consumed per day: 5040 cans


No wonder y'all 'Mericans're so fat!

kalisphoenix
Jul 5, 2007, 12:14 AM
LOL, I guess you need some sort of relief from the 85 hours of study per week (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Nuclear_Power_School)?

That page is somewhat inaccurate. We didn't really study 85 hours per week. It was basically like taking 35-40 undergrad-level credit hours, depending on the specific week of training, though, so 85 hours of schoolwork and studying each week probably isn't that far off. Also, since the course materials are classified, you can't just study them in your barracks -- you have to come in to the classroom, through all the security, and sit in the room and read and do homework. There were also petty officers standing watch and roaming the halls, so you'd get bitched at if you weren't studying or were horsing around.

I failed a test in Power School (the second phase), and my Chief came down hard since I hadn't spent enough time in the building studying. So I went from having no mandatory study hours to getting 30-5's, which means that I had to study 30 hours a week in the building, with a minimum of 5 hours on the nights preceding school days. No fun.

RacerX
Jul 5, 2007, 12:58 AM
Makes me home sick. The Kitty Hawk and Constellation were everyday sights while I was growing up. I was heart broken when they retired the Constellation and Coronado just didn't seem the same without the Kitty Hawk (the Nimitz is there now).

What was funny was that the absence of those carriers effected me almost as much as most of the buildings in my high school being gone when I went to my 20th last summer. Still, most of Coronado was still the same. :D

tominated
Jul 5, 2007, 04:14 AM
hehe... kitty sounds soooo girly

Mechcozmo
Jul 5, 2007, 04:21 AM
A pretty cool place to visit is the USS Midway in San Diego. You get to walk all over a World War Two era carrier... and it is even cooler when some Nimitz-class carriers are floating past. If you thought the Midway was big (and it is) the Nimitz-class are monsters! :)

evilgEEk
Jul 5, 2007, 12:28 PM
My brother served on the Kitty Hawk in the mid 90's, he still says it was the most amazing experience in his entire life.

The craziest thing he saw was when they were on their way to Singapore they got caught in a typhoon and one of the F-18's that had been out earlier in the day wasn't secured properly and actually fell off the carrier! Can you imagine? A jet just falls off the boat and sinks to the bottom of the ocean, that's just insane!

- Average crew number: 5300

That's bigger than the town I grew up in.

Keebler
Jul 5, 2007, 01:40 PM
My brother served on the Kitty Hawk in the mid 90's, he still says it was the most amazing experience in his entire life.

The craziest thing he saw was when they were on their way to Singapore they got caught in a typhoon and one of the F-18's that had been out earlier in the day wasn't secured properly and actually fell off the carrier! Can you imagine? A jet just falls off the boat and sinks to the bottom of the ocean, that's just insane!



That's bigger than the town I grew up in.

that's one expensive (20+ mill) mistake. wow. that would be wild to see considering they are big jets, but probably look tiny on a carrier...and plus, a carrier in a typhoon. wow!

Counterfit
Jul 5, 2007, 02:05 PM
No wonder y'all 'Mericans're so fat!

Because we drink 11.4oz. of soda per day while serving on aircraft carriers?

Earendil
Jul 5, 2007, 04:13 PM
A comparison of the US carrier fleets to the rest of the world.
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/carriers.htm
Interesting tidbit from the above article.
"America has twice as many aircraft carriers as the rest of humanity combined, and America's aircraft carriers are substantially larger than almost all the other's aircraft carriers. The Navy likes to call the big Nimitz class carriers "4.5 acres of sovereign and mobile American territory" -- all two dozen American carriers of all classes add up to about 75 acres of deck space. Deckspace is probably a good measure of combat power. The rest of the world's carriers have about 15 acres of deck space, one fifth that of America's."

Up for a sea war, anyone? :eek:

evilgEEk
Jul 5, 2007, 04:32 PM
A comparison of the US carrier fleets to the rest of the world.
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/carriers.htm
Interesting tidbit from the above article.
"America has twice as many aircraft carriers as the rest of humanity combined, and America's aircraft carriers are substantially larger than almost all the other's aircraft carriers. The Navy likes to call the big Nimitz class carriers "4.5 acres of sovereign and mobile American territory" -- all two dozen American carriers of all classes add up to about 75 acres of deck space. Deckspace is probably a good measure of combat power. The rest of the world's carriers have about 15 acres of deck space, one fifth that of America's."

Up for a sea war, anyone? :eek:

Which is why America's enemies have taken to terrorist attacks, because no one in the world can stand up to our military.

Earendil
Jul 5, 2007, 04:50 PM
Which is why America's enemies have taken to terrorist attacks, because no one in the world can stand up to our military.

If ya can't beat them, attack their families :cool:

sailnavy
Jul 5, 2007, 08:55 PM
Earendil - Having been on deployment during 9-11, on an aircraft carrier, that really isn't a funny comment, especially given that I had family flying that day in the US. It was truly an odd reversal of expected circumstances.

I can't say that it isn't a tactic employed by terrorist groups, but definitely not funny.

Nice to see the Sh***y Kitty still gettin around. I was fortunate and only was on the Nukes, as Air Conditioning and Fresh Water are in better supply.

AlBDamned
Jul 5, 2007, 09:13 PM
Earendil - Having been on deployment during 9-11, on an aircraft carrier, that really isn't a funny comment, especially given that I had family flying that day in the US. It was truly an odd reversal of expected circumstances.

I can't say that it isn't a tactic employed by terrorist groups, but definitely not funny.

Nice to see the Sh***y Kitty still gettin around. I was fortunate and only was on the Nukes, as Air Conditioning and Fresh Water are in better supply.

So can you guys who've worked on these things tell us all a little bit about life on them? Are the pilots all pretentious a/holes like Top Gun would have us believe?! ;) Is it really cramped? Do you get sick of it? Out of 5,000 people on-board, how many do you actually know and know well? What about leisure time, how rowdy do you all get when on shore leave?!

So many questions... I'm always fascinated by jobs that are so far removed from my own that they almost seem like different universe. (I mean this in a good way - that may read as if I'm being condescending and I'm not). A friend of mine is a flight attendant and has the craziest schedule of flying round the world. LA one week, London the next, Tokyo the next... It's worlds apart from being stuck behind a desk all day.

Lord Blackadder
Jul 5, 2007, 09:32 PM
US "super carriers" - the most powerful warships on earth...I still haven't gotten over my awe of these ships. Kitty Hawk is the last of the non-nuclear carriers. Take a good look at her, she will likely be decomissioned next year.

This thread is well timed - I was in NYC yesterday, standing on top of the Empire State building, and a I saw an aircraft carrier docked on the Hudson near where the USS Intrepid is usually found. But Intrepid is in dry dock currently and this carrier was not an Essex-class ship...it was smaller, more modern looking and had a ski jump. It looked like one of the the Invincible class British carriers!

Sure enough, I bumped into a bunch of Brits in naval uniforms later in Battery Park. Their hats read "HMS Illustrious".

Very, Very Cool!

Earendil
Jul 5, 2007, 09:44 PM
Earendil - Having been on deployment during 9-11, on an aircraft carrier, that really isn't a funny comment,

Than it's a good thing nothing in my most implied humor or that I thought it was in the least bit comical.

especially given that I had family flying that day in the US. It was truly an odd reversal of expected circumstances.

I can't say that it isn't a tactic employed by terrorist groups, but definitely not funny.


I'm a relative pacifist. Few things get me riled up. But any %^&*er who deliberately goes around people willing to protect what it is you're after, and instead harms the unprotected in an attempt to demoralize the soldiers is a... I honestly have no words. Especially not ones that can be used on this board :mad:

Now... *breaths* back on topic!! Anyone else ever served on an Aircraft Carrier and care to share some interesting tidbits that we drybacks may not know? What makes life on one completely different than any other ship?

AlBDamned
Jul 5, 2007, 10:01 PM
US "super carriers" - the most powerful warships on earth...I still haven't gotten over my awe of these ships. Kitty Hawk is the last of the non-nuclear carriers. Take a good look at her, she will likely be decomissioned next year.

This thread is well timed - I was in NYC yesterday, standing on top of the Empire State building, and a I saw an aircraft carrier docked on the Hudson near where the USS Intrepid is usually found. But Intrepid is in dry dock currently and this carrier was not an Essex-class ship...it was smaller, more modern looking and had a ski jump. It looked like one of the the Invincible class British carriers!

Sure enough, I bumped into a bunch of Brits in naval uniforms later in Battery Park. Their hats read "HMS Illustrious".

Very, Very Cool!

Sweet, although I always think the English carriers look like decrepit old barges in comparison to to the US ones - even the "regular-fueled" 50-year-old Kitty Hawk!

Edit: Also, why do the UK carriers have a ski jump? Even the new UK ones - The Queen Elizabeth Class (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Elizabeth_Class_aircraft_carrier) - look to have one? The US vessels seem to do jus fine with catapults?

Counterfit
Jul 5, 2007, 11:33 PM
We get all our skiing fun taken care of in the Appalachians and Rockies. :p

AlBDamned
Jul 5, 2007, 11:41 PM
We get all our skiing fun taken care of in the Appalachians and Rockies. :p

Don't be so smug - the UK has that Scottish Ski resort you know... ;)

DZ/015
Jul 6, 2007, 02:29 AM
so 85 hours of schoolwork and studying each week probably isn't that far off...So I went from having no mandatory study hours to getting 30-5's, which means that I had to study 30 hours a week in the building, with a minimum of 5 hours on the nights preceding school days. No fun.

I don't think I ever put in more than 65 hours myself.

Mando 30, man that must have sucked. At least you never had to do ordered hours (I hope). I felt sorry for those guys.

Yeah, I'm a former nuke. The memory still has not faded, I and I got out 17 years ago.

Lord Blackadder
Jul 6, 2007, 07:02 AM
Edit: Also, why do the UK carriers have a ski jump? Even the new UK ones - The Queen Elizabeth Class (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Elizabeth_Class_aircraft_carrier) - look to have one? The US vessels seem to do just fine with catapults?

American (and current French) carriers use catapaults for big conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) aircraft while the British, Spanish and Italian navies use ski jumps for their smaller vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, all variants of the Harrier.

You could use a ski jump for CTOL aircraft, but it seems that US designers are satisfied with the performance of the catapaults. The British pioneered the use of the ski jump on aircraft carriers.

StealthRider
Jul 6, 2007, 08:36 AM
CTOL also allows for heavier aircraft, like our late Tomcat, the C-2 and E-2 series, etc. And it's not like power is in short supply on one of the nukes...

Lord Blackadder
Jul 6, 2007, 08:58 AM
One thing to note: the next-gen British carriers are designed to be fully convertible to full-CTOL (or, more correctly, CATOBAR - Catapault Assisted Takeoff But Arrested Landing).

So they could, in the future, operate the CTOL version of the F35, or even a navalized version of the Typhoon.

Peace
Jul 6, 2007, 11:19 AM
You guys really should try looking at an Aircraft Carrier battlegroup from the deck of a Destroyer in said group like I did..Big fun! :eek:

Interesting stats for ya.

Expected life of a ship during a sea battle ( circa 1970 ) :

Escort ( now called a frigate ) : 3 min.--enough time to allow destroyers to get off a few rounds
Destroyer : 7 minutes -- enough time to allow a cruiser to get of a few missiles
Cruiser : -- 15 minutes --enough time to allow a carrier to get planes off the deck
Carrier : --- 30 minutes --enough time to destroy a country

This was taught to us in the Navy.Over and over and over.Constantly and daily.

Counterfit
Jul 6, 2007, 12:14 PM
CTOL also allows for heavier aircraft, like our late Tomcat, the C-2 and E-2 series, etc. And it's not like power is in short supply on one of the nukes...

I'd like to see how the electromagnetic cats perform on the Ford class. :D

SMM
Jul 6, 2007, 12:39 PM
I was stationed on the "Chitty Kitty" January 1972-October 1972 (jeez - was it really that long ago?). I kinda got screwed. I had just completed 20 months in the Mekong Delta. If you had < 1 year left, you got a discharge. I missed it by 2 weeks. :mad: But, they did try to give you orders to where you wanted to go. So, I picked Whidbey Island Naval Air Station. That is close to home. So, I ended up in an A-6 squadron. Three months later, we packed our bags and joined the Kitty in San Diego. A month later I was off the coast of Vietnam, for another 10 months. :mad: :mad:

I joined the Navy to stay out of Vietnam. Instead I spent 30 out of 48 months there.

For those who marvel at the size of an American Attack Carrier, let me tell you as someone who lived on one; they get real small, real fast.

I must admit, it was nice to get some news about the old girl again. Thanks! ;)

StealthRider
Jul 6, 2007, 02:34 PM
You guys really should try looking at an Aircraft Carrier battlegroup from the deck of a Destroyer in said group like I did..Big fun! :eek:

Escort ( now called a frigate ) : 3 min.--enough time to allow destroyers to get off a few rounds
Destroyer : 7 minutes -- enough time to allow a cruiser to get of a few missiles
Cruiser : -- 15 minutes --enough time to allow a carrier to get planes off the deck
Carrier : --- 30 minutes --enough time to destroy a country

This was taught to us in the Navy.Over and over and over.Constantly and daily.

Probably a bit different now that the Burke-class destroyers are pressing into cruiser turf (and, in many cases, replacing them, as in the case of the decommissioning of the Vincennes (CG-49)).

\Surface Warfare FTW!

evilgEEk
Jul 6, 2007, 02:39 PM
For those who marvel at the size of an American Attack Carrier, let me tell you as someone who lived on one; they get real small, real fast.

My brother wrote almost those exact words to me in a letter when he was on the Kitty Hawk. I remember he said it was overwhelming at first, but after a few months you realize you're on a tiny metal floating island.

My brother was only on the Kitty Hawk for about eight months though. His job was to direct aircraft out on the deck, and the engine exhaust ended up making him extremely ill. He spent two months in a Singapore hospital before coming home with a medical discharge.

SMM
Jul 6, 2007, 02:43 PM
You guys really should try looking at an Aircraft Carrier battlegroup from the deck of a Destroyer in said group like I did..Big fun! :eek:

Interesting stats for ya.

Expected life of a ship during a sea battle ( circa 1970 ) :

Escort ( now called a frigate ) : 3 min.--enough time to allow destroyers to get off a few rounds
Destroyer : 7 minutes -- enough time to allow a cruiser to get of a few missiles
Cruiser : -- 15 minutes --enough time to allow a carrier to get planes off the deck
Carrier : --- 30 minutes --enough time to destroy a country

This was taught to us in the Navy.Over and over and over.Constantly and daily.

When the North invaded South Vietnam in 1972, we sent 6 carrier battlegroups into the fray. One morning, standing on the flightdeck, I saw the Connie, Enterprise, America, Coral Sea and (I think) the JFK on all points of the horizon. That, plus all of their escorts and screening vessels. It was quite a sight!

dmw007
Jul 7, 2007, 06:35 AM
From the pictures that ship looks amazing. I can only imagine how it must look up close in person. :eek: :)

SMM
Jul 7, 2007, 05:46 PM
My brother wrote almost those exact words to me in a letter when he was on the Kitty Hawk. I remember he said it was overwhelming at first, but after a few months you realize you're on a tiny metal floating island.

My brother was only on the Kitty Hawk for about eight months though. His job was to direct aircraft out on the deck, and the engine exhaust ended up making him extremely ill. He spent two months in a Singapore hospital before coming home with a medical discharge.

I hope you are proud of him. Working on a carrier flightdeck, directing airplanes, is not for the faint of heart, or the foolish. It is one of the most hazardous non-combat jobs in the military. Any mistake is almost always fatal. I worked in avionics (Radar and Electronic Countermeasures). My reason for being on the flightdeck, during operations, was dubious at best. My systems either worked, or did not. I could not repair them there, so I just confirmed, "Yes, it failed". Then the pilot would decide whether to abort, or not. My partner took care of the communication and navigation equipment. It was possible to swap out some of his equipment, so I would help him. I never could get comfortable up there. It scared the living ****** out of me.

Guys like your brother amazed me. For them it was a second home. They could 'sense' everything going on around them (their survival depended on it). It takes a special kind of person to do that job.

sailnavy
Jul 7, 2007, 07:15 PM
Are the pilots all pretentious a/holes like Top Gun would have us believe?!
-Some are, most aren't.


Is it really cramped?
-Yes, very much so.

Do you get sick of it?
-Yes. Imagine being locked in your office building with all your co-workers for 6-8 months.

Out of 5,000 people on-board, how many do you actually know and know well?
- I knew my squadron really well (150ish people) probably another 150-200 from the other squadrons and the boat folks. It's ALOT of people, how many people do you know in your office building, yeah you see them, but do you know them?

What about leisure time, how rowdy do you all get when on shore leave?!
-Depends where you are and what you're doing.

A friend of mine is a flight attendant and has the craziest schedule of flying round the world. LA one week, London the next, Tokyo the next... It's worlds apart from being stuck behind a desk all day.
-It's not that glamorous, and it gets old. The boat doesn't go fast enough to do London and Tokyo in two days, and the airplanes need fuel to fly that far.

Sorry for the delay with the answers.

sailnavy
Jul 7, 2007, 07:19 PM
The ski jumps are to augment the harrier take-offs. They consume significantly more fuel in a vertical take-off scenario, and have some safety issues. Most of the time forward motion is used to get airflow over the control surfaces. During the transition from the deck to over water, there is a loss of lift due to the disappearance of ground effect and the planes settle a bit, the ski jump takes the forward motion and converts it to vertical, helping with the transition off the deck. Also, it looks pretty cool doesn't it?

The new Electro-Mag Cats are currently in testing. From what I've heard they've at least stopped welding the shuttle to the rails. Progress.;)

sailnavy
Jul 7, 2007, 07:24 PM
The guys that work the flight deck always amazed me. I once had one of my airframers get blown back into a Jet Blast Deflector, she wasn't paying attention and an aircraft came up on the power. She was great, shook it right off. "Glad that JBD was there, or I'd really have gone for a ride!" Amazing.

It's a dangerous place, and they are all true professionals. I once had an F-18 turn on me and put their exhaust over my head (I saw it and ducked, thankfully), that'll wake you up. :D

AlBDamned
Jul 8, 2007, 05:48 PM
Sorry for the delay with the answers.

Are you kidding, I've waited years to ask these questions so thanks for answering at all. :)

I appreciate it must be a pretty tough assignment, though. Dangerous too.

ErikCLDR
Jul 8, 2007, 10:40 PM
That looks like an amazing site to see. I have never seen an aircraft carrier in person. With the buildings in the foreground it really gives a sense of its vast size. I think "Kitty Hawk" is a really clever name. It would be sad to see that name be lost.

I was watching some show on I think the Discovery Channel about a future Navy Ship. It is stealth unless really close to the radar antenna. It can't be detected over the curve of the earths surface but can shoot missiles to that place. It has the aircraft that don't need a runway, boat launches I think, and an amphibious hovercraft. It will also have rockets that can take out incoming missiles supposedly.

One of my teacher says that UPS has the 6th largest airforce in the world? Is this true.

sailnavy
Jul 8, 2007, 10:52 PM
I don't know about UPS, but cargo is increasing in market share. I think a private company on the west coast owns most commercial aircraft and leases them to the operators, so they might win.

The army oddly has quite a number of aircraft, mostly helos. They say they have more aircraft than the airforce, and more boats than the navy.

sailnavy
Jul 8, 2007, 10:53 PM
There is alot going on with Radar Absorbing Materials, and radar deflecting design.

Counterfit
Jul 9, 2007, 12:25 AM
It has the aircraft that don't need a runway,

They're called "helicopters" :D
It will also have rockets that can take out incoming missiles supposedly.
SeaRAM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RIM-116_Rolling_Airframe_Missile#Sea_RAM) probably.
One of my teacher says that UPS has the 6th largest airforce in the world? Is this true.

Well, American Airlines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Airlines) has the largest airline in fleet size and mile travelled

The new Electro-Mag Cats are currently in testing. From what I've heard they've at least stopped welding the shuttle to the rails. Progress.;)
That's good to know. :D

sailnavy
Jul 9, 2007, 06:04 AM
SeaRAM probably.

Hard to know. The old CIWS has some benefits that a Missile doesn't. :)

AlBDamned
Jul 9, 2007, 06:21 AM
SeaRAM probably.

Hard to know. The old CIWS has some benefits that a Missile doesn't. :)

Do you know if the Kitty Hawk has one of those launchers? Something very similar was definitely on one of the turrets.

StealthRider
Jul 9, 2007, 08:36 AM
Kitty Hawk, if I remember correctly, has four CIWS guns, two RAM launchers, and some Sea Sparrow launchers, though I forget how many of those are aboard.

The old CIWS has some benefits that a Missile doesn't.

Such as being able to spray down the sea surface if someone's coming too close in a dhow or RHIB?

Black&Tan
Jul 9, 2007, 03:37 PM
One thing to note: the next-gen British carriers are designed to be fully convertible to full-CTOL (or, more correctly, CATOBAR - Catapault Assisted Takeoff But Arrested Landing).

I can't help but giggle reading the above acronym. It's not like you're going to have a catapult assisted landing.:D

Lord Blackadder
Jul 9, 2007, 03:42 PM
Such as being able to spray down the sea surface if someone's coming too close in a dhow or RHIB?

I didn't know that the CIWS could shoot surface craft; can it be manually controlled?

I remember the first time I saw the CIWS, I was on the Iowa-class battleship New Jersey. Impressive looking device, to say the least!

StealthRider
Jul 9, 2007, 03:47 PM
That isn't its primary intended purpose, certainly, but yes, manual control in order to fire on surface targets is possible with the Block 1B Phalanx.

Lord Blackadder
Jul 9, 2007, 04:09 PM
Yeah, I had to go look it up and I see that they equipped it with a FLIR for surface work. The most impressive thing about the CIWS is that it's totally automated and self-contained...it's almost scary to think about, a 20mm M61 Gatling that fires itself!

Counterfit
Jul 9, 2007, 05:34 PM
And it's only managed to shoot down a friendly once. :cool:

StealthRider
Jul 9, 2007, 06:08 PM
And it's only managed to shoot down a friendly once. :cool:

When was that?

sailnavy
Jul 9, 2007, 06:34 PM
Friendly aircraft, or friendly missiles?

I know there have been a few cases of, wish it was armed, but I didn't know it had show down a friendly, or are you referring to the Vincinnes incident?

Midshipman, you running a Mac at the boat school? I was one of the first with ethernet in my room there, running an old 5300. Ahh, those were the days. How are you a 4/c in July and on the internet? It's Pledge summer..:p

StealthRider
Jul 9, 2007, 09:55 PM
Friendly aircraft, or friendly missiles?
I know there have been a few cases of, wish it was armed, but I didn't know it had show down a friendly, or are you referring to the Vincinnes incident?


I thought the Vincennes issue was a missile accident rather than a CIWS problem. I've never heard of a friendly-fire CIWS accident, at least not one resulting in fatalities.

Midshipman, you running a Mac at the boat school? I was one of the first with ethernet in my room there, running an old 5300. Ahh, those were the days. How are you a 4/c in July and on the internet? It's Pledge summer..

Sailnavy, I'm just a common ROTC mid. USNA reject, actually. I'm still going for the commission, though, however I have to get it. I'm planning on applying to USNA again this year through both ROTC and the usual channels - it'll be CORTRAMID, then straight on to Plebe Summer. :p

From what I head, though, the issued machines at Canoe U nowadays are pretty tricked-out Dells - fast, but nothing special. When/if I go, I'm having my parents ship me my MBP once Plebe Summer is over. :D

AlBDamned
Jul 9, 2007, 10:44 PM
Well guys, the Kitty Hawk left about an hour ago. (http://www.2gb.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3304&Itemid=204) I ran down to Garden Island and got some pics, I'll post them tomorrow (no camera lead here at the moment).

StealthRider
Jul 9, 2007, 10:53 PM
Last port of call before home and decommissioning? I had no idea that would happen so soon - the GHWB isn't due to be commissioned until a couple years from now at least.

AlBDamned
Jul 9, 2007, 11:01 PM
Last port of call before home and decommissioning? I had no idea that would happen so soon - the GHWB isn't due to be commissioned until a couple years from now at least.

I'm not sure, but that could possibly mean one more Australian port call. As far as I've read (and I've been reading a lot on the topic in these last few days!), it's not due to be decommissioned until 2008, meaning it has at least one more long-ish stint at sea which has to mean several more port calls?

Counterfit
Jul 9, 2007, 11:18 PM
When was that?

Friendly aircraft, or friendly missiles?
One aircraft (A-6 in '96) and one battleship (Missouri in '91).
I know there have been a few cases of, wish it was armed, but I didn't know it had show down a friendly, or are you referring to the Vincinnes incident?

Nope (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalanx_CIWS#Phalanx_in_combat).

AlBDamned
Jul 9, 2007, 11:22 PM
One aircraft (A-6 in '96) and one battleship (Missouri in '91).



Sounds like a scene from Under Seige to me (Phalanx, F-18 shot down etc) ;)

StealthRider
Jul 10, 2007, 10:36 AM
One aircraft (A-6 in '96) and one battleship (Missouri in '91).

Nope (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalanx_CIWS#Phalanx_in_combat).

That would explain it - I was looking for US FF incidents.

sailnavy
Jul 10, 2007, 11:20 AM
That was a test exercise, not like it just randomly shot down a Friendly.

Yes, Vincinnes was a Missile... (thought maybe there was confusion) It was a mess, you'll probably see the Bridge video at some point in the Navy. Just bad stuff. Murphy's law.

Yeah, definitely don't have a MBP during pledge summer.

StealthRider
Jul 10, 2007, 08:31 PM
Yeah, definitely don't have a MBP during pledge summer.

You mean they don't give Mac users extra privileges at the Academy? :eek: :p

AlBDamned
Jul 10, 2007, 08:45 PM
More to come too...

AlBDamned
Jul 10, 2007, 09:13 PM
Bit annoying, but I only managed to get the closer ones as the ship was pulling out yesterday. Still, the one with the wharf demonstrates how big the damn thing was!

AlBDamned
Jul 10, 2007, 09:14 PM
And the last of them...

sailnavy
Jul 11, 2007, 08:30 AM
It's amazing they don't roll over isn't it? :eek:

StealthRider
Jul 11, 2007, 10:47 AM
It's amazing they don't roll over isn't it? :D

It's all that crap they have below the waterline...two (or eight for the Big E) reactors or eight boilers makes for some pretty nice ballast... :p

evilgEEk
Jul 12, 2007, 12:51 AM
And the last of them...

Thanks for the pictures!

I emailed them to my brother and he really enjoyed seeing them as well. Brought back a ton of memories for him. :)

AlBDamned
Jul 12, 2007, 05:57 AM
Thanks for the pictures!

I emailed them to my brother and he really enjoyed seeing them as well. Brought back a ton of memories for him. :)

Cool that's nice to hear :)