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jmac2480
Jul 29, 2003, 01:25 PM
I have a Powermac G4 that got hit by lightning and destroyed the internal Ethernet adapter. I can not find instructions to remove the internal adapter and add a new PCI adapter. Any help or links to assist in this matter would be appreciated.

LimeLite
Jul 29, 2003, 02:14 PM
If you're adding a PCI Ethernet card, I'm not sure that there's any real need to remove the fried one, unless it's affecting something else.

patrick0brien
Jul 29, 2003, 02:36 PM
-jmac2480

I'd also invest in a spike arrestor (not to be confused with a surge supressor), to prevent that from happening again.

Le Big Mac
Jul 29, 2003, 02:58 PM
Originally posted by LimeLite
If you're adding a PCI Ethernet card, I'm not sure that there's any real need to remove the fried one, unless it's affecting something else.

i had this happen on an older powermac and just popped in the new card. Had to choose the pci card for ethernet, but that was it (under OS9 at the time). Don't bother removing unless you really need the slot.

AnotherMortal
Jul 29, 2003, 03:02 PM
Originally posted by jmac2480
I have a Powermac G4 that got hit by lightning and destroyed the internal Ethernet adapter. I can not find instructions to remove the internal adapter and add a new PCI adapter. Any help or links to assist in this matter would be appreciated.

Depending on the model of PowerMac you might not be able to replace the integrated NIC, you may need to replace the whole logic board, which at that point, I'd recommend trying an ethernet card first. However, if your machine was hit by lightning, it might have damaged other components not just the NIC, and replacing the logic board may be the better option, especially if it would be covered by warranty/insurance.

gopher
Jul 29, 2003, 03:18 PM
Originally posted by patrick0brien
-jmac2480

I'd also invest in a spike arrestor (not to be confused with a surge supressor), to prevent that from happening again.

What spike arrestor can withstand 300000 Ampere of electricity? That's what happens when you get a direct strike to the outside line. I don't believe anything can stop electricity at such high current from coming in at nearly the speed of light. If there is something, please point me to a link.