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View Full Version : Apple Aust: You cannot do this! iPod$$ = rip! (RANT)




DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 07:06 PM
hey all,

i woke up this morning all excited about the new ipod releases and whatever else was going to come with it. so i go to apple.com and see that there is a new ipod touch!! wow! the 8gb model is $US229! thats a pretty good deal!

the 16gb is $US299, which isn't too bad. no biggie, i check out the apple.com.au store to see if its been updated yet, and it has.

i see the "From $329 AU" price tag for the 8gb and nearly fall over. what the hell apple? you can't just add an extra $100AU onto the price because we aren't in your country! if you convert US$229 its only AU$282. this is pathetic apple, i know that you cant just compare things as easily as currency rates. but we aren't a country that has a weak economy. i just dont understand...

the AU$549 price tag on the 32gb comes out to be US$445, an extra US$45..

is this just me?? or does this whole thing just push you over the edge? i have an urge to get on ebay and buy one from the US, even with shipping it would still be less!



thechidz
Sep 9, 2008, 07:08 PM
vote with your wallet

Trip.Tucker
Sep 9, 2008, 07:09 PM
hey all,

i woke up this morning all excited about the new ipod releases and whatever else was going to come with it. so i go to apple.com and see that there is a new ipod touch!! wow! the 8gb model is $US229! thats a pretty good deal!

the 16gb is $US299, which isn't too bad. no biggie, i check out the apple.com.au store to see if its been updated yet, and it has.

i see the "From $329 AU" price tag for the 8gb and nearly fall over. what the hell apple? you can't just add an extra $100AU onto the price because we aren't in your country! if you convert US$229 its only US$282. this is pathetic apple, i know that you cant just compare things as easily as currency rates. but we aren't a country that has a weak economy. i just dont understand...

the AU$549 price tag on the 32gb comes out to be US$445, an extra US$45..

is this just me?? or does this whole thing just push you over the edge? i have an urge to get on ebay and buy one from the US, even with shipping it would still be less!

*shrug* oh well.

dukebound85
Sep 9, 2008, 07:12 PM
there are more factors in price than just conversion rates......

Schtumple
Sep 9, 2008, 07:16 PM
Actually if you add on Sales Tax, which isn't shown, you probably find that the price difference isn't that large, and hey, atleast it isn't the UK 170 for 8GB, $350 (US), gotta love that inflation...

DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 07:16 PM
vote with your wallet

poor uni student here...

*shrug* oh well.

for you maybe, not for me.

there are more factors in price than just conversion rates......

yes i know. however its not like apple needs to make as much profit on their ipods... come on it just plain annoys me that their profits are through the roof yet we see no price cuts or anything..

DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 07:16 PM
Actually if you add on Sales Tax, which isn't shown, you probably find that the price difference isn't that large, and hey, atleast it isn't the UK 170 for 8GB, $350 (US), gotta love that inflation...

so u kno what i mean then :p

TEG
Sep 9, 2008, 07:18 PM
there are more factors in price than just conversion rates......

Exactly... shipping, duty/import charges, adding 'u' to many words needlessly ;). Have you compared the prices of other items sold in the US with what is sold in OZ? I just had this discussion with someone complaing about the prices in the UK, and compared to other items, it is actually a discount.

TEG

Chundles
Sep 9, 2008, 07:22 PM
Economy of scale.

Australia and the US - roughly the same size and distance from the factory.

20 million people here, 370 million people there. Makes it much easier to sell at a lower price where you know you're going to make back the lesser margin on the volume of sales.

Then there are all the other variables.

In the end, we pay more - it's not immoral it's just the way things work. You can't go basing prices off the exchange rate alone.

Schtumple
Sep 9, 2008, 07:24 PM
so u kno what i mean then :p

Yes, but what I'm saying is the US store does always look far more enticing because Sales Tax is not shown, I can't remember the percentage that Sales Tax comes to, it varies per state, but it comes pretty close to VAT over here, which is shown in our prices. So overall, your not as bad off as you think.

DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 07:25 PM
Exactly... shipping, duty/import charges, adding 'u' to many words needlessly ;). Have you compared the prices of other items sold in the US with what is sold in OZ? I just had this discussion with someone complaing about the prices in the UK, and compared to other items, it is actually a discount.

TEG

no idea about how to add in duty prices and everything else, nor do i have the patience lol.

heres a quick comparison between an Intel CPU E8500

US $189.99
AU $220.

a lot closer in price than what the ipod is.

harddrive prices are pretty much comparable. a WD (green thing) is around $165AU here, about $150US...

DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 07:28 PM
Economy of scale.

Australia and the US - roughly the same size and distance from the factory.

20 million people here, 370 million people there. Makes it much easier to sell at a lower price where you know you're going to make back the lesser margin on the volume of sales.

Then there are all the other variables.

In the end, we pay more - it's not immoral it's just the way things work. You can't go basing prices off the exchange rate alone.

ok then i guess..
just wish it were a bit more obvious and comparable. it annoys me that we are forced to pay this increased price because we are small, hate to see what other countries have!

Yes, but what I'm saying is the US store does always look far more enticing because Sales Tax is not shown, I can't remember the percentage that Sales Tax comes to, it varies per state, but it comes pretty close to VAT over here, which is shown in our prices. So overall, your not as bad off as you think.

sales tax is somewhat like GST?? thats pretty silly that they dont show it i wasnt aware of that!! i guess that will put the price up a tad, thanks for that

dukebound85
Sep 9, 2008, 07:32 PM
no idea about how to add in duty prices and everything else, nor do i have the patience lol.

heres a quick comparison between an Intel CPU E8500

US $189.99
AU $220.

a lot closer in price than what the ipod is.

harddrive prices are pretty much comparable. a WD (green thing) is around $165AU here, about $150US...

the us price doesnt include sales tax though. does the au one?

i always anticipate paying 10% in taxes when bugeting for things (usually tax is around there or a tad less)

Schtumple
Sep 9, 2008, 07:33 PM
sales tax is somewhat like GST?? thats pretty silly that they dont show it i wasnt aware of that!! i guess that will put the price up a tad, thanks for that

VAT :p VAT is a 17.5% tax on all items sold in the UK, if an item is going to be sold at 10, VAT puts the price up to 11.75

In the US the sales tax can be as high as 20%, I could be wrong though, but I think Californians and New Yorkers pay by far the most in terms of Sales Tax.

telf22
Sep 9, 2008, 07:36 PM
i know what you mean op. but i moved to nyc from aus a few yr ago so yerrr...it sux

DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 07:36 PM
VAT :p VAT is a 17.5% tax on all items sold in the UK, if an item is going to be sold at 10, VAT puts the price up to 11.75

In the US the sales tax can be as high as 20%, I could be wrong though, but I think Californians and New Yorkers pay by far the most in terms of Sales Tax.

wow thats pretty heffty!! we pay a 10% GST (goods and services tax) but that is already included in the price, so there is no extra prices that we pay. i dont understand why the VAT isn't included for you?? i guess youd get used to it though.

dukebound85
Sep 9, 2008, 07:36 PM
VAT :p VAT is a 17.5% tax on all items sold in the UK, if an item is going to be sold at 10, VAT puts the price up to 11.75

In the US the sales tax can be as high as 20%, I could be wrong though, but I think Californians and New Yorkers pay by far the most in terms of Sales Tax.

here is a link on state sales tax
http://www.taxadmin.org/FTA/rate/sales.html

keep in mind that this does not include city or county sales tax which are in addition to state sales tax

dukebound85
Sep 9, 2008, 07:38 PM
wow thats pretty heffty!! we pay a 10% GST (goods and services tax) but that is already included in the price, so there is no extra prices that we pay. i dont understand why the VAT isn't included for you?? i guess youd get used to it though.

you do get used to it. i really wish though that the price you see is the out the door price

it sucks getting enticed for something at 150 and knowing you will be paying close to 170+ for the item for example at check out. or when i bought my motorcycle advertised for 3500 and paying over 3800 out the door. quite a big difference


i mean gasoline here has the tax included in the price advertised. why retailers dont follow suit i dont know

DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 07:38 PM
i know what you mean op. but i moved to nyc from aus a few yr ago so yerrr...it sux

hows the prices going compared to living in aus for ya? the fact that the taxes are so high is kinda wierd, mustnt be a very good government :p jks.

DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 07:40 PM
you do get used to it. i really wish though that the price you see is the out the door price

it sucks getting enticed for something at 150 and knowing you will be paying close to 170+ for the item for example at check out


i mean gasoline here has the tax included in the price advertised. why retailers dont follow suit i dont know

now that is pathetic. if we barter a tv for $1500 then we will pay 1500 (plus maybe a credit fee or two).

on the receipt we can see how must the tax was etcetc. do the taxes that you pay go towards the government? im guessing they do.. the company wouldnt see anything of that.

dukebound85
Sep 9, 2008, 07:49 PM
now that is pathetic. if we barter a tv for $1500 then we will pay 1500 (plus maybe a credit fee or two).

on the receipt we can see how must the tax was etcetc. do the taxes that you pay go towards the government? im guessing they do.. the company wouldnt see anything of that.

no the company doesnt see any of it, it's all government


on a tangent, when you guys work at say 40k/year is that income figured after taxes as in you take it home or is it like here where you take home ~75-80% of stated income due to taxes, medicare, ss and such. like i know an advertised 8/hr job is really around 6/hr that you actually receive


for example, i was making 1675/month but only saw 1200-1300 on my checks after taxes and such.

doubleohseven
Sep 9, 2008, 07:49 PM
The iPod touch has gone down $70 for the 8GB in Australia in comparison from the older (or yesterday's) model, so I'm not complaining. However I do understand your point. Currently US $229 buys AU $285.

Schtumple
Sep 9, 2008, 07:50 PM
wow thats pretty heffty!! we pay a 10% GST (goods and services tax) but that is already included in the price, so there is no extra prices that we pay. i dont understand why the VAT isn't included for you?? i guess youd get used to it though.

I honestly thought you'd typed VAT wrong when you first put GST :p

DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 07:53 PM
no the company doesnt see any of it, it's all government


on a tangent, when you guys work at say 40k/year is that income figured after taxes as in you take it home or is it like here where you take home ~75-80% of stated income due to taxes, medicare, ss and such. like i know an advertised 8/hr job is really around 6/hr that you actually receive


for example, i was making 1675/month but only saw 1200-1300 on my checks after taxes and such.

stupid government.

|_ no we get taxed weekly/fornightly/whatever. say i get 500 a week i will get taxed however much (depending on my tax bracket). at the end of the year we can claim certain things back yada yada.

The iPod touch has gone down $70 for the 8GB in Australia in comparison from the older (or yesterday's) model, so I'm not complaining. However I do understand your point. Currently US $229 buys AU $285.

well thats a start!! i wonder how much it has reduced in the US.

that was kind of my point, i wish our dollar would come back up so that our exchange rates were better, might definately think about grabbing an ebay ipod then eheh

TraceyS/FL
Sep 9, 2008, 07:53 PM
now that is pathetic. if we barter a tv for $1500 then we will pay 1500 (plus maybe a credit fee or two).

on the receipt we can see how must the tax was etcetc. do the taxes that you pay go towards the government? im guessing they do.. the company wouldnt see anything of that.

Sale tax can goa variety of places.

Can go something like this:

State: 5%
County: 2% (orange county FL has a HUGE hotel tax rate)
Local: .5% (or sometimes penny per dollar, or penny per sale - that is what built our library here, a 1 cent tax).

So the prices Apple would have on their sight would vary GREATLY from State to State (some have no sales tax, some have 10%). It's not a national thing - so it could never be priced that way.

It just depends on where you live. Mine is 7% in my county here in FL, and 6.5% 4 miles up the road in the next county.

DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 07:53 PM
I honestly thought you'd typed VAT wrong when you first put GST :p

ohhh hahaha nope i was referring to our countries name for it.

Trip.Tucker
Sep 9, 2008, 08:08 PM
Economy of scale.

Australia and the US - roughly the same size and distance from the factory.

20 million people here, 370 million people there. Makes it much easier to sell at a lower price where you know you're going to make back the lesser margin on the volume of sales.

Then there are all the other variables.

In the end, we pay more - it's not immoral it's just the way things work. You can't go basing prices off the exchange rate alone.


370 million?!!!! I see accuracy is not Australia's strong point :p

dukebound85
Sep 9, 2008, 08:12 PM
370 million?!!!! I see accuracy is not Australia's strong point :p

yea kinda near 70 million off lol. we are around 300 for thse who didnt know

DoFoT9
Sep 9, 2008, 08:13 PM
370 million?!!!! I see accuracy is not Australia's strong point :p

he was only 65million off :p

suprnovaynwa
Sep 10, 2008, 12:09 AM
Hi,

If you actually go to the Apple Online store, add an item or two in the cart and check the shopping cart. You'll see the price breakdown on the shopping cart page and it will have the item cost without GST. At the bottom, it will add 10% of the total cart and that is added as GST.

Compare the prices that way and it makes more sense. :)

Eg.
iPod nano, 16GB - (PRODUCT) RED
Quantity:
1
Item Price:
A$ 253.64

Chundles
Sep 10, 2008, 12:15 AM
370 million?!!!! I see accuracy is not Australia's strong point :p

Oops, my bad. I did wake up at 3am guys... Meant to say 270 million but it looks like you've ploughed through the 300 mil mark - good for you...

QuarterSwede
Sep 10, 2008, 12:33 AM
Sale tax can goa variety of places.

Can go something like this:

State: 5%
County: 2% (orange county FL has a HUGE hotel tax rate)
Local: .5% (or sometimes penny per dollar, or penny per sale - that is what built our library here, a 1 cent tax).

So the prices Apple would have on their sight would vary GREATLY from State to State (some have no sales tax, some have 10%). It's not a national thing - so it could never be priced that way.

It just depends on where you live. Mine is 7% in my county here in FL, and 6.5% 4 miles up the road in the next county.
This is exactly why the US doesn't include something like VAT in retail prices. It just varies too much.

Ex: Here in Colorado Springs our tax on regular goods is 7.5% (I think). However there is no tax on food. Back in Virginia tax on regular goods was 4.5% and on food it was 4% (again, if I remember correctly ... I hate internet acronyms).

Remember, the US is basically a bunch of smaller, state, governments who have decided to be under the control of a larger, federal, government. There is always a change that if a state wanted to (and voted to be) they could secede (break away) from the union. It's quite an interesting government system.

Koodauw
Sep 10, 2008, 12:38 AM
if you convert US$229 its only US$282.

Math Fail.

MowingDevil
Sep 10, 2008, 12:43 AM
370 million?!!!! I see accuracy is not Australia's strong point :p

Perhaps he was including the Illegal immigrant workforce? :p

Acutally we've had the same price issues in Canada, basically getting gouged. In the past when our dollar was low (.65) that was always the reasoning. Basically we'd pay a few extra dollars for a magazine, a few extra grand on a car and of course hundreds more for a Mac. Fastforward to the past couple of years and our currencies have pretty much been at par...yet strangely enough all our merchandise remained enormously out of whack. It takes time for the adjustment to settle it we were told (ie they needed more time to rake in the inflated profits)...well what was the solution? The magazines took off the US price so we wouldn't know how much extra we were still paying....Apple came clean and adjusted the prices so we basically pay $100 more for a MacBookPro....the car companies have somewhat reduced prices but you can still go across the line and pickup a Toyota Prius for $10,000 less if you go through an Auto-broker. All the major auto companies tried to say the warranty wouldn't be valid if CDNs did that but that is infact a violation of NAFTA actually so that won't hold up. I wouldn't cross-border shop to save a hundred bucks but 10 grand & I'm doing it no questions asked!

I'm still shocked at the prices of Mac computers in Australia! :eek:
Does those prices include all taxes?

DoFoT9
Sep 10, 2008, 03:53 AM
Hi,

If you actually go to the Apple Online store, add an item or two in the cart and check the shopping cart. You'll see the price breakdown on the shopping cart page and it will have the item cost without GST. At the bottom, it will add 10% of the total cart and that is added as GST.

Compare the prices that way and it makes more sense. :)

Eg.
iPod nano, 16GB - (PRODUCT) RED
Quantity:
1
Item Price:
A$ 253.64

yes lol im well aware of the GST prices being added onto the price. it happens automatically though, the prices that are quoted are with GST. in america it seems as though it isnt added on until you go to the cart.

This is exactly why the US doesn't include something like VAT in retail prices. It just varies too much.

Ex: Here in Colorado Springs our tax on regular goods is 7.5% (I think). However there is no tax on food. Back in Virginia tax on regular goods was 4.5% and on food it was 4% (again, if I remember correctly ... I hate internet acronyms).

Remember, the US is basically a bunch of smaller, state, governments who have decided to be under the control of a larger, federal, government. There is always a change that if a state wanted to (and voted to be) they could secede (break away) from the union. It's quite an interesting government system.

oh well thats pretty confusing to understand. in australia we have one tax rate on everything (im pretty sure its everything!) which is 10%.

so are you saying that if your in one state where the tax on items are 7.5%, you could go to the nextdoor neighbours who are at 4% tax, buy it there and be laughing?? or do they have some sort of thing you ahve to pass through??

there are no taxes from border to border where we are, im on the NSW/QLD border i drive over it everyday haha

Math Fail.
clearly a typo fail...no need to be immature

DoFoT9
Sep 10, 2008, 03:55 AM
Perhaps he was including the Illegal immigrant workforce? :p


I'm still shocked at the prices of Mac computers in Australia! :eek:
Does those prices include all taxes?

yes all taxes paid for, walk away no more to pay! (as they say)

dukebound85
Sep 10, 2008, 09:54 PM
yes lol im well aware of the GST prices being added onto the price. it happens automatically though, the prices that are quoted are with GST. in america it seems as though it isnt added on until you go to the cart.



oh well thats pretty confusing to understand. in australia we have one tax rate on everything (im pretty sure its everything!) which is 10%.

so are you saying that if your in one state where the tax on items are 7.5%, you could go to the nextdoor neighbours who are at 4% tax, buy it there and be laughing?? or do they have some sort of thing you ahve to pass through??

there are no taxes from border to border where we are, im on the NSW/QLD border i drive over it everyday haha


clearly a typo fail...no need to be immature

yup taxes are based off the location where you buy it

but remember that states are huge for the most part so it is pretty impractical for me to just drive to say nebraska to buy something on a whim. with that said, there are many many many residents from other states in different states at any time. it would be absloute hell to have to go through a customs like process for buying stuff in diff states

DoFoT9
Sep 11, 2008, 02:11 AM
yup taxes are based off the location where you buy it

but remember that states are huge for the most part so it is pretty impractical for me to just drive to say nebraska to buy something on a whim. with that said, there are many many many residents from other states in different states at any time. it would be absloute hell to have to go through a customs like process for buying stuff in diff states

it would be really cool if you lived on the border of 3 states and could get the best prices. thats more what i was thinking haha. i live on a border, but there are the same taxes all round our country.

Chundles
Sep 11, 2008, 02:18 AM
yup taxes are based off the location where you buy it

but remember that states are huge for the most part so it is pretty impractical for me to just drive to say nebraska to buy something on a whim.


Not compared to our states they're not...

The next state north of me is about a 15 hour drive on the highway. It's about 5 hours to the southern border and about 15 to the west.

MowingDevil
Sep 11, 2008, 02:46 AM
Same in Canada. I have to drive abo 12 hrs to get from Vancouver (BC) to either Calgary or Edmonton (Alberta)...AB doesn't have any sales tax but its hardly worth the trip. Could also go to Oregon in the US but then we have to drive through Washington & deal w/ customs on the way up.

dukebound85
Sep 11, 2008, 03:09 PM
Not compared to our states they're not...

The next state north of me is about a 15 hour drive on the highway. It's about 5 hours to the southern border and about 15 to the west.

i know, i was answering a question concerning us states..

dtklamf
Sep 12, 2008, 03:57 AM
there are more factors in price than just conversion rates......

yeah but some idiots like the O.P don't seem to be able to grasp such a simple concept.

DoFoT9
Sep 12, 2008, 04:04 AM
yeah but some idiots like the O.P don't seem to be able to grasp such a simple concept.

mate, thats not on. if your going to be abusive and just downright mean then your not going to last in society very long at all.

i am here to learn and to be taught, not to be made fun of nor picked on.

grow up.

TraustiB
Sep 12, 2008, 07:20 AM
Iceland:

iTouch 8gb = $588
iTouch 16gb = $766
iTouch 32gb = $966 :(

iPod classic 80gb = $479

iPod nano 8gb = $366

All prices are US dollars and prices of older iPods models.

MowingDevil
Sep 14, 2008, 08:35 AM
With the Canadian, US & Australian dollars all within a dime of each other why are iTunes songs .99 in Canada & the US and 1.69 in Aus?

For the full album in N/America its $9.99 and in Australia its....wait for it....$16.99!!!

Cripes!!! I couldn't believe it when I saw it, I thought Apple quietly went & bumped up the cost of everything...would make the labels happy no doubt.
Nope, its just the cost of things in Aus.

Can anyone explain the "added Down Under costs" of binary code?
I can understand higher prices when it comes to physical product being imported, duty, taxes, shipping etc. How is there shipping expenses in DIGITAL FREAKING DOWNLOADS?!?!?

I'm only visiting here in Auz for a year but I honestly don't know how they do it here & just put up w/ this. I'm told Australia is in a recession, what they need is an uprising and revolt!!!

lacereza
Sep 14, 2008, 09:00 AM
EVERYTHING is more expensive in Australia, often two or three times the price. Clothes, shoes, electronics, DVDs... it's not as if Apple alone is charging more. Look at how much CDs cost in both countries, and you'll see that the iTunes price difference is in line with that.

I'm in the US now and I couldn't believe how cheap everything is compared to at home. One example (that many not resonate with the majority of readers here, but anyway) is makeup -- a MAC brand eyeshadow is about AU$35 at home, and US$12-14 here.

But think about it this way: average salaries are way higher in Australia than in the US. I know professionals here on $30-40k a year after five years in the workforce -- they'd be on $70-80k at least back home. It's not as simple as dollar for dollar conversions.

orangetrumpeter
Sep 14, 2008, 11:26 AM
eBay is your friend.

MowingDevil
Sep 14, 2008, 10:31 PM
EVERYTHING is more expensive in Australia, often two or three times the price. Clothes, shoes, electronics, DVDs... it's not as if Apple alone is charging more. Look at how much CDs cost in both countries, and you'll see that the iTunes price difference is in line with that.

I'm in the US now and I couldn't believe how cheap everything is compared to at home. One example (that many not resonate with the majority of readers here, but anyway) is makeup -- a MAC brand eyeshadow is about AU$35 at home, and US$12-14 here.

But think about it this way: average salaries are way higher in Australia than in the US. I know professionals here on $30-40k a year after five years in the workforce -- they'd be on $70-80k at least back home. It's not as simple as dollar for dollar conversions.

C'mon man, we're talking digital downloads...no overhead for product or shipping whatsoever. How can almost doubling the cost of binary code really be justified? I'm on a professional job exchange and the difference is wage is about $6 or 7 grand from Canada to Aus so its not always that much.

What would iTunes downloads be in Mexico, 5 cents (US) a song?

DoFoT9
Sep 14, 2008, 10:49 PM
C'mon man, we're talking digital downloads...no overhead for product or shipping whatsoever. How can almost doubling the cost of binary code really be justified? I'm on a professional job exchange and the difference is wage is about $6 or 7 grand from Canada to Aus so its not always that much.

What would iTunes downloads be in Mexico, 5 cents (US) a song?

not to mention somewhere like south africa, theyd be paying a massive 0.00001cents per song :rolleyes:

Sayer
Sep 14, 2008, 11:08 PM
If you are such a "poor uni student" maybe you shouldn't be spending a ton of cash on a toy?

Or maybe you should get a job and pay for it with your *earned* income?

Counterfit
Sep 15, 2008, 12:16 AM
There is always a change that if a state wanted to (and voted to be) they could secede (break away) from the union.
Yeah, some of them tried that. We call it the U.S. Civil War.
but remember that states are huge for the most part so it is pretty impractical for me to just drive to say nebraska to buy something on a whim. with that said, there are many many many residents from other states in different states at any time. it would be absloute hell to have to go through a customs like process for buying stuff in diff states
On the other hand, My back yard is right up to the RI/MA border, so I can take advantage of their 2% sales tax, and the tax holidays they have twice a year. And NH (0% sales tax) isn't that far away either...
C'mon man, we're talking digital downloads...no overhead for product or shipping whatsoever. How can almost doubling the cost of binary code really be justified?

There IS overhead for digital downloads. They have to pay whatever company owns the distribution rights for that particular country. They charge however much they charge, and the prices in another country have nothing to do with it (outside the EU).

MowingDevil
Sep 15, 2008, 07:18 AM
There IS overhead for digital downloads. They have to pay whatever company owns the distribution rights for that particular country. They charge however much they charge, and the prices in another country have nothing to do with it (outside the EU).

No there's not. Apple doesn't pay anything up front for digital downloads, thats rediculous. They pay a fee based on sales, ie a portion of what the consumer is charged. You pay your .99 and Apple sends 70% of this to the labels. So even if Apple charges 1.69 in Australia it doesn't cost Apple one penny more than it does in the US and they still send 70% back to the label. Considering the Aussie dollare is about 2 dimes less than the US coin, why are they charging the Aussie consumer 7 dimes more????

Here's ultimately why I find this setup bogus. I found this online in an article but it sums up why iTunes shouldn't be marked up like MAC eyeliner or whatever that has to be shipped & imported:
No limited shelf space like in a terrestrial store, and no restocking required. Once it's encoded and sent to Apple, it's up there forever and available 24/7.

...and don't even get me started on how much of that 70% actually finds its way back to the artist.

MowingDevil
Sep 16, 2008, 12:46 AM
Trent Reznor chimes in on BLOATED Australian music prices:

http://opinion.latimes.com/bitplayer/2007/09/trent-reznor-on.html

http://digg.com/music/Trent_Reznor_No_wonder_people_steal_music

http://www.music2dot0.com/archives/36

DoFoT9
Sep 16, 2008, 01:20 AM
If you are such a "poor uni student" maybe you shouldn't be spending a ton of cash on a toy?

Or maybe you should get a job and pay for it with your *earned* income?
oh i wont be spending the money on this toy dont you worry. tis a total rip!.

i have a job. i have an income. it is spent driving to university 5 days a week.

Trent Reznor chimes in on BLOATED Australian music prices:

http://opinion.latimes.com/bitplayer/2007/09/trent-reznor-on.html

http://digg.com/music/Trent_Reznor_No_wonder_people_steal_music

http://www.music2dot0.com/archives/36

aahh thats very interesting. thank you for that, now i have extra proof that im somewhat right :)

PrinceValiant
Sep 16, 2008, 02:38 AM
LOL this guy obviously can't remember the bad old days when the exchange rate was 50c and before the Internet when Aussies paid DOUBLE for electronics. So consider yourself lucky that you are only paying about $30-40more than America which I think is a pretty good deal. We are still paying a lot less for iPods than even Singapore which is supposed to be renowned for its cheap electronics.

If you think iPods are a rip off, consider that a $240,000 Porsche 911 in Australia costs only $70,000 in the USA. Now thats a real scam.

DoFoT9
Sep 16, 2008, 04:24 AM
LOL this guy obviously can't remember the bad old days when the exchange rate was 50c and before the Internet when Aussies paid DOUBLE for electronics. So consider yourself lucky that you are only paying about $30-40more than America which I think is a pretty good deal. We are still paying a lot less for iPods than even Singapore which is supposed to be renowned for its cheap electronics.

If you think iPods are a rip off, consider that a $240,000 Porsche 911 in Australia costs only $70,000 in the USA. Now thats a real scam.

honestly, how hard is it to be referred to as "the OP" or something that ISNT DEGRADING?!?
this 'guy' was obviously too young to remember that,. im only 19 geez...:rolleyes:

i remember the dollar being around 63c and wondering if it would ever hit $1.. still hasnt haha. close though.

were paying $30-$40 more for an ipod!! imagine an actual computer. apple would be raking it in.

buy a porche in US and then import it, shipping would have to be cheaper. (maybe they charge that $170k to redesign because of the seats hahaha?)

auggie2k
Sep 16, 2008, 04:42 AM
Same annoyance here, was going to get a new 16GB Nano - $199 (which is 139 here in Ireland).

Checked the Apple Store Ireland and it's 189 - thats 60 in the difference - which is $80.

kkman
Sep 16, 2008, 04:52 AM
i think it is always cheeper if you wait a bit

and also their is always something better
:):apple::):apple::):apple:
:apple::apple::apple::apple::apple:

MowingDevil
Sep 16, 2008, 06:54 AM
No one has yet to explain why Auzzies always have to pay more. The included tax aside, is it the shipping? The iTunes rates blow that excuse out of the water. Seriously, I'm only hear for 10 months so I'm not all that concerned. My CDN dollar does alright here in the exchange. I seriously don't know why you guys put up with this. Have the politicians every been held accountable and addressed this? ...when they're not dancing around drunk in their underwear & gyrating female MPs that is. :D

paulej69
Sep 22, 2008, 10:16 PM
honestly, how hard is it to be referred to as "the OP" or something that ISNT DEGRADING?!?
this 'guy' was obviously too young to remember that,. im only 19 geez...:rolleyes:

i remember the dollar being around 63c and wondering if it would ever hit $1.. still hasnt haha. close though.

were paying $30-$40 more for an ipod!! imagine an actual computer. apple would be raking it in.

buy a porche in US and then import it, shipping would have to be cheaper. (maybe they charge that $170k to redesign because of the seats hahaha?)

Just out of interest, the Aussie dollar dropped to 0.48 of the USD just after the September 11 attacks in the US - hope to hell that it never gets that low again.

For the person thinking of importing a Porsche - don't forget shipping (at least several thousand dollars), import duty, GST, luxury car tax, and delivery within Australia, not to mention conversion to left hand drive unless you want to drive your nice car around with "caution - left hand drive" stickers all over it.:o

DoFoT9
Sep 22, 2008, 10:20 PM
Just out of interest, the Aussie dollar dropped to 0.48 of the USD just after the September 11 attacks in the US - hope to hell that it never gets that low again.

For the person thinking of importing a Porsche - don't forget shipping (at least several thousand dollars), import duty, GST, luxury car tax, and delivery within Australia, not to mention conversion to left hand drive unless you want to drive your nice car around with "caution - left hand drive" stickers all over it.:o

if a porche costs 240k in australia, and only 70k in the US. SURELY it would not cost 170k to ship, pay taxes, convert to RHS etc. if it only cost 100k then it would still be cheaper then buying the australia 'version'. tahst the way i see it anyways.

p.s. hope the aussie $$ doesnt get much lower then what it is!

paulej69
Sep 22, 2008, 11:26 PM
if a porche costs 240k in australia, and only 70k in the US. SURELY it would not cost 170k to ship, pay taxes, convert to RHS etc. if it only cost 100k then it would still be cheaper then buying the australia 'version'. tahst the way i see it anyways.

p.s. hope the aussie $$ doesnt get much lower then what it is!


Well - it depends on what model of Porsche 911 - from a quick google, the MSRP: $73,500-136,500 USD depending on model.

At the low end, with all taxes, the 73,500 model would cost around 112,000 Australian, NOT including conversion to RHD, which I imagine would add thousands more. That also does not include the cost of insurance during shipping, which may be a few thousand more again.

At the high end, with taxes and shipping, again, with no conversion to RHD or insurance, cost in AUD would be over 200,000.

Probably a little cheaper than buying in Aus, but it really depends on the cost of converting to RHD - I suspect this would be VERY expensive, and may eat up any savings.

hellomoto4
Sep 22, 2008, 11:28 PM
Don't forget that USA pay tax on top of the sale price, where as the sale price in AUS includes GST

DoFoT9
Sep 23, 2008, 05:43 AM
Well - it depends on what model of Porsche 911 - from a quick google, the MSRP: $73,500-136,500 USD depending on model.

At the low end, with all taxes, the 73,500 model would cost around 112,000 Australian, NOT including conversion to RHD, which I imagine would add thousands more. That also does not include the cost of insurance during shipping, which may be a few thousand more again.

At the high end, with taxes and shipping, again, with no conversion to RHD or insurance, cost in AUD would be over 200,000.

Probably a little cheaper than buying in Aus, but it really depends on the cost of converting to RHD - I suspect this would be VERY expensive, and may eat up any savings.

so it could be a little cheaper, im sure you could find some good deals searching vigorously.

im guessing if someone is going to be comfortable with the left hand drive thing then that would save a lot.

Don't forget that USA pay tax on top of the sale price, where as the sale price in AUS includes GST

ahh tru good point. maybe it wont be so even then afterall.

richard.mac
Sep 23, 2008, 06:16 AM
tech just is more expensive in Australia than it is in the US, Asia and Europe.

DoFoT9
Sep 23, 2008, 06:27 AM
tech just is more expensive in Australia than it is in the US, Asia and Europe. weve just got to except it. hey at least we still get all the good stuff, like the iPhone now YAY!, and weve got an excellent quality of living.

yes i know, i guess ill eventually get used to it once i get out of Uni and start making real dosh.

Cheffy Dave
Sep 23, 2008, 07:17 AM
vote with your wallet

AMEN, I agree. I'd also write,(e-Mail) Apple and ask them why?;)

hazza.jockel
Sep 23, 2008, 08:18 AM
370 million?!!!! I see accuracy is not Australia's strong point :p

Don't know were your from but the U.S. is not known for its intelligence either. But I'm sure you would not know that cause your head is so far up your ass that it ain't coming back out (assuming your American, if not disregard this message):p

And on a more serious note:
I agree with the OP. We do pay far to much for things in Australia. And it doesn't stop there. We also get things a lot later. For example movies. Hell Boy 2 came out at least 3 months earlier in other parts of the world. We also have only one freaking apple store in the whole country. and its more then a 12 hour drive away from me.

Baron58
Sep 23, 2008, 08:26 AM
it would be really cool if you lived on the border of 3 states and could get the best prices. thats more what i was thinking haha. i live on a border, but there are the same taxes all round our country.

I'm in Delaware. I could go 15 miles in three different directions and be in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, or Maryland. Out of all of those, Delaware has no sales tax. :D (The state income mostly comes from corporate taxes; it's a big headquarters for biotech & banks, since the regulations are very business-friendly / consumer-unfriendly). You would think that people would do a lot of tax-free shopping, but it doesn't seem to be a big deal. :confused:

With any of the States, though, cars are treated differently from other purchases. If someone from another state came to Delaware and bought a Mac, they'd pay no sales tax, and that would be the end of it. On the other hand, if they came to Delaware and bought a car, they'd get charged whatever the sales tax is for their home State. This is universal throughout the US.

For on-line purchases, it's a bit different. If there were a company that ONLY had a 'physical' presence in California, for example, and you were in any *other* state, you could order from them (online or by phone/mail) and pay no tax at all. On the other hand, if they have *any* 'physical' presence in your state, you would have to pay sales tax. Like, my sister use to be able to order from costco.com and pay no sales tax. Costco finally put a store in her State (Nebraska), so now if she ordered from costco.com she'd have to pay sales tax.

MowingDevil
Sep 23, 2008, 09:23 AM
Well - it depends on what model of Porsche 911 - from a quick google, the MSRP: $73,500-136,500 USD depending on model.

At the low end, with all taxes, the 73,500 model would cost around 112,000 Australian, NOT including conversion to RHD, which I imagine would add thousands more. That also does not include the cost of insurance during shipping, which may be a few thousand more again.

At the high end, with taxes and shipping, again, with no conversion to RHD or insurance, cost in AUD would be over 200,000.

Probably a little cheaper than buying in Aus, but it really depends on the cost of converting to RHD - I suspect this would be VERY expensive, and may eat up any savings.

Why would you have to convert it anyways? Is this a law or something? That would be insane as you'd have to redo the entire interior as the guages would be on the wrong side otherwise. There's been Asian & European vehicles imported into Canada and people seem to be able to drive w/o converting to LHD. As far as I know its legal, must be.

MowingDevil
Sep 23, 2008, 09:34 AM
tech just is more expensive in Australia than it is in the US, Asia and Europe. weve just got to except it. hey at least we still get all the good stuff, like the iPhone now YAY!, and weve got an excellent quality of living.

Why? The only reason you do get charged more is because you accept it.
There's other countries overseas that don't get charged as much and Australia should be no different. I'd agree the dollar value is a fair reason for different prices to an extent. Its gotta work both ways though. The American dollar is getting the **** kicked out of it right now. If the Auz dollar goes way up your prices should come down accordingly. Your tax is included so thats a factor. Shipping on some goods should be inline w/ shipping to other foreign countries. Isn't Australia closer to China than the US & Canada?!? Why would it cost more then? China makes almost everything these days.

Digital files on iTunes aren't made in China though. ;)

THATS an area you should get a break, instead you're being bent over a barrell without lube. You should write Apple & ask why? ...and don't be happy that you have iPhones, it will just make the situation worse. Religion was the opiate of the masses....now its entertainment & gadgets. Get mad and get better prices, its only fair.

paulej69
Sep 23, 2008, 11:20 PM
Why would you have to convert it anyways? Is this a law or something? That would be insane as you'd have to redo the entire interior as the guages would be on the wrong side otherwise. There's been Asian & European vehicles imported into Canada and people seem to be able to drive w/o converting to LHD. As far as I know its legal, must be.

No it's not the law - you can certainly own and drive a left hand drive vehicle in Australia.
But the law DOES state that any such vehicle be identified by garish yellow signs stating "CAUTION - Left hand drive Vehicle" - on the front and back of your car - I mean these are large signs similar in size to the registration plates. I have seen these on a number of imported Ford Mustangs recently - KILLS the look of a cool car.
I would think that anyone wanting to drive a Porsche would HATE to compromise its looks in this way!

paulej69
Sep 23, 2008, 11:23 PM
Don't know were your from but the U.S. is not known for its intelligence either.

Hey, I'm an Aussie, and even I take exception to this - for some reason it is fashionable in Australia to see Americans as "dumb" - maybe they can be insular because their country is so big and varied, but think of this:

70% of Nobel prize winners have been American - that's 70% of ALL Nobel prizes, in all subjects, for over 100 years.

That's not a dumb country.

DoFoT9
Sep 23, 2008, 11:40 PM
Hey, I'm an Aussie, and even I take exception to this - for some reason it is fashionable in Australia to see Americans as "dumb" - maybe they can be insular because their country is so big and varied, but think of this:

70% of Nobel prize winners have been American - that's 70% of ALL Nobel prizes, in all subjects, for over 100 years.

That's not a dumb country.

i think its just a sterotype from TV shows, news stories and what we hear in general that gives countries the "negative" opinion about america. of course there is going to be smart people in a nation with 300mil+ people!!! they are not all going to be dumb! but with that big of a population it also means that there are also going to be a big number of not so smart people, thats mainly who we see on TV (im guessing), unless their very good actors :p

DoFoT9
Jun 12, 2009, 08:52 AM
i see the "From $329 AU" price tag for the 8gb and nearly fall over. what the hell apple? you can't just add an extra $100AU onto the price because we aren't in your country! if you convert US$229 its only AU$282. this is pathetic apple, i know that you cant just compare things as easily as currency rates. but we aren't a country that has a weak economy. i just dont understand...

the AU$549 price tag on the 32gb comes out to be US$445, an extra US$45..


well now here i am nearly a year later.. the situation HASNT changed...

8gb Touch:: $US229 (should be $AU280), $AU329

16gb Touch:: $US299 (should be $AU366), $AU419

32gb Touch:: $US399 (should be $AU489), $AU549..

it goes on really, dont even get me started on the laptops... will we ever get relief? i may as well start shipping things over from the US!

Ivan P
Jun 12, 2009, 09:01 AM
well now here i am nearly a year later.. the situation HASNT changed...

8gb Touch:: $US229 (should be $AU280), $AU329

16gb Touch:: $US299 (should be $AU366), $AU419

32gb Touch:: $US399 (should be $AU489), $AU549..

it goes on really, dont even get me started on the laptops... will we ever get relief? i may as well start shipping things over from the US!

Well that's not unexpected, Apple usually never adjusts their prices until the product is actually updated and, as it is, no iPod except the shuffle has seen any sort of update since this topic was made. Totally normal, I'd see what happens this September, that's when the prices will change.

alhedges
Jun 12, 2009, 09:48 AM
It's not just Australia - prices in Europe (and even South Africa!) for electronics are almost always substantially cheaper in the US than in those countries. I've had friends from Germany visit, and colleagues from South Africa visit, and in both cases they stocked up on electronics before heading back.

I'm not really sure why that is. WRT Australia, I could see that the much smaller population and the relative isolation might account for some difference in the price...but this wouldn't hold true for Europe. (Well, it might for Apple products, but not for, say digital cameras).

I should note that the median income in AU/NZ is 20% less than that in the US, so it's not like the prices are increased to account for that, either.

DoFoT9
Jun 12, 2009, 06:27 PM
Well that's not unexpected, Apple usually never adjusts their prices until the product is actually updated and, as it is, no iPod except the shuffle has seen any sort of update since this topic was made. Totally normal, I'd see what happens this September, that's when the prices will change.

yup thats a good point, they have hardly been updated its quite sad. you would think that the space in them would of at least changed (32gb became available however), 64gb + 128gb arent that costly really.

It's not just Australia - prices in Europe (and even South Africa!) for electronics are almost always substantially cheaper in the US than in those countries. I've had friends from Germany visit, and colleagues from South Africa visit, and in both cases they stocked up on electronics before heading back.

its sad, kind of like they do it on purpose to get more people into the country or to get more people to get stuff shipped from their country. argh

I'm not really sure why that is. WRT Australia, I could see that the much smaller population and the relative isolation might account for some difference in the price...but this wouldn't hold true for Europe. (Well, it might for Apple products, but not for, say digital cameras).

our smaller population yes, but isolation?? we live closer to Singapore and China then the US does (im pretty sure we do anyway haha). unless they want to ship to the US then back to our place i dont understand why we are further away :(

I should note that the median income in AU/NZ is 20% less than that in the US, so it's not like the prices are increased to account for that, either.

that also doesnt make sense. we are poorer so things should be cheaper :p at least our dollar has slightly gone up!

mrkgoo
Jun 12, 2009, 07:25 PM
well now here i am nearly a year later.. the situation HASNT changed...

8gb Touch:: $US229 (should be $AU280), $AU329

16gb Touch:: $US299 (should be $AU366), $AU419

32gb Touch:: $US399 (should be $AU489), $AU549..

it goes on really, dont even get me started on the laptops... will we ever get relief? i may as well start shipping things over from the US!

A year later, and you still don't get the concept of a sales tax.

Not to mention, where were you several months ago when the exchange rate was a lot poorer? I moves to the US from NZ 6 months ago, when the exchange rate was so poor for NZers, that a lot of things were actually CHEAPER to buy in NZ (I assume same for Aus). And I'm in Oregon, where they don't have a sales tax.

In February, I understand the exchange rate was from US->Aus was something like 1.56. If you bought an iPod in the US at that time, that would have made the 8GB iPod touch, somewhere in the region of AU$360. If you include Sales Tax (of a conservative 10%), you still get near AU$400. See how exchange rates don't really tell the whole story?

Look - here's the way Apple does things. When something is released, it is released internationally, and the prices appear to be set for the exchange rate at the time, and they don't change until another hardware release. For example, the October release of the Macs last year couldn't have come at a worse time - all the Macs in NZ shot up nearly 40% in price.

Another example - 99c apps and iTunes songs are that - 99c in the US. In New Zealand a 99c app is NZ$1.29, while a 99c song is NZ$1.79. So, the songs are a rip-off, but the apps are bargains. You win some, you lose some.

DoFoT9
Jun 12, 2009, 07:44 PM
A year later, and you still don't get the concept of a sales tax.

Not to mention, where were you several months ago when the exchange rate was a lot poorer? I moves to the US from NZ 6 months ago, when the exchange rate was so poor for NZers, that a lot of things were actually CHEAPER to buy in NZ (I assume same for Aus). And I'm in Oregon, where they don't have a sales tax.

Look - here's the way Apple does things. When something is released, it is released internationally, and the prices appear to be set for the exchange rate at the time, and they don't change until another hardware release. For example, the October release of the Macs last year couldn't have come at a worse time - all the Macs in NZ shot up nearly 40% in price.

Another example - 99c apps and iTunes songs are that - 99c in the US. In New Zealand a 99c app is NZ$1.29, while a 99c song is NZ$1.79. So, the songs are a rip-off, but the apps are bargains. You win some, you lose some.

the sales tax accounts for some of the costs, not all of them. i have been talking to my GF about the topic and she said that australia also has some sort of Electronic Goods Tax or something from overseas products. i have no idea if its true but she would be the one to know.

the things (at the bad price point) were never cheaper to buy here in australia (for me), because im in australia - im not buying externally with money that "rates" higher then what it is, i wouldnt know.

nice way to tie in the insult btw :rolleyes:

tabasco70
Jun 12, 2009, 08:10 PM
yes i know. however its not like apple needs to make as much profit on their ipods... come on it just plain annoys me that their profits are through the roof yet we see no price cuts or anything..


but then apple is a company. its goal is to make the most profit possible. its not a service. just because theyre making money doesnt mean theyre somehow obliged to give everything for cheap. that just doesnt make sense.
people are still buying from apple, and only when microsoft started to attack apple's prices (and alerting customers that they could get similar things for cheaper) did they lower them.

mrkgoo
Jun 12, 2009, 08:11 PM
the sales tax accounts for some of the costs, not all of them. i have been talking to my GF about the topic and she said that australia also has some sort of Electronic Goods Tax or something from overseas products. i have no idea if its true but she would be the one to know.

the things (at the bad price point) were never cheaper to buy here in australia (for me), because im in australia - im not buying externally with money that "rates" higher then what it is, i wouldnt know.

nice way to tie in the insult btw :rolleyes:

Oh, it wasn't meant to be an insult (apologies).

And yes, there is associated electronics taxes for both Aus and NZ.

But I think you get my point - the exchange rates mean very little unless you are actually prepared or able to get a product from overseas, at that time. You're in Australia, buying Australian goods, with Australian money. The situation in US is different. It's a strange and confusing system to consider products by exchange rate. See, on the one hand you are using the currently more favourable exchange rate to down play the price of products in AUs compared to US, but you don't balance that with when they are bad. Point is, it doesn't matter.

I'm in the US at the moment, earning US dollars, and I can buy US goods. If I were to transfer that money to NZ, some things are actually cheaper here. But that's because I am in the unique situation of having both accounts. While the price doesn't actually change in either place, I can pick and choose the cheaper price. A few months ago, the iPod touch was cheaper in NZ. Now it's more expensive.

When you don't have that ability, for example, people who are in NZ, they haven't seen anything change. Like yourself - the price of an iPod touch has not changed in Australia ever, yet the price in US to you has been going up and down. The point is - the exchange rate is what it is, but it shouldn't matter. One day, the price will be very favourable again when Apple releases new hardware, and you'll be smiling.

What's the price of apps in the appstore? I'm still buying apps at NZ$1.29, which is around US80c. :D

edit: Also the sales tax DOES account for a large portion. Take the current exchange. An iPod touch for US$229, assumign a sales tax of 10% makes it around US$253 = AU$311 - not actually that much of a difference from the AU$329

DoFoT9
Jun 12, 2009, 09:42 PM
but then apple is a company. its goal is to make the most profit possible. its not a service. just because theyre making money doesnt mean theyre somehow obliged to give everything for cheap. that just doesnt make sense.
people are still buying from apple, and only when microsoft started to attack apple's prices (and alerting customers that they could get similar things for cheaper) did they lower them.

good point, apple is a company whose sole goal is to make profits for their shareholders.. giving stuff for cheap has never been an option with apple i guess - you pay the premium for a (imo) better quality product. im fine with that for their computers - but in a quite harsh market for mp3 players and stuff it should be a different story.

ah well, wasnt like i was going to buy a Touch anyway ;)

Oh, it wasn't meant to be an insult (apologies).

thats cool, no offense - was just checking

And yes, there is associated electronics taxes for both Aus and NZ.

But I think you get my point - the exchange rates mean very little unless you are actually prepared or able to get a product from overseas, at that time. You're in Australia, buying Australian goods, with Australian money. The situation in US is different. It's a strange and confusing system to consider products by exchange rate. See, on the one hand you are using the currently more favourable exchange rate to down play the price of products in AUs compared to US, but you don't balance that with when they are bad. Point is, it doesn't matter.

ok well that makes sense then, guess its actually more fair-er then i thought.

I'm in the US at the moment, earning US dollars, and I can buy US goods. If I were to transfer that money to NZ, some things are actually cheaper here. But that's because I am in the unique situation of having both accounts. While the price doesn't actually change in either place, I can pick and choose the cheaper price. A few months ago, the iPod touch was cheaper in NZ. Now it's more expensive.

When you don't have that ability, for example, people who are in NZ, they haven't seen anything change. Like yourself - the price of an iPod touch has not changed in Australia ever, yet the price in US to you has been going up and down. The point is - the exchange rate is what it is, but it shouldn't matter. One day, the price will be very favourable again when Apple releases new hardware, and you'll be smiling.

What's the price of apps in the appstore? I'm still buying apps at NZ$1.29, which is around US80c. :D

apps here in Aust are $1.19Aus, or $0.96US, so we are JUST ahead in terms of the price we pay. that is probably the ONLY thing that is cheaper haha. MBP's, MB's, iMac's etc are a good $200 more :(

edit: Also the sales tax DOES account for a large portion. Take the current exchange. An iPod touch for US$229, assumign a sales tax of 10% makes it around US$253 = AU$311 - not actually that much of a difference from the AU$329

that makes it a lot more closer :) thanks for clarifying!

YanniDepp
Jun 21, 2009, 09:07 AM
The next state north of me is about a 15 hour drive on the highway. It's about 5 hours to the southern border and about 15 to the west.

Wowzers. I can drive from one end of Scotland to the other in four hours, and from East to West in under 2 hours.

DoFoT9
Jun 21, 2009, 09:10 AM
Wowzers. I can drive from one end of Scotland to the other in four hours, and from East to West in under 2 hours.

lol nice way to bring back the thread ;)

its 15mins to the north border, 20 hours to the south and 20 to the west for me :p