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joepunk
Feb 24, 2009, 06:02 PM
Oh, My God (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,498784,00.html) :eek:

Sometimes it's just really hard to kill a bug.

According to the Russian news agency RIA Novosti, a mosquito managed to live 18 months clinging to the outside of the International Space Station, without any food, being bombarded by radiation and enduring fluctuating temperatures ranging from minus 230 degrees to 140 degrees Fahrenheit.

"We brought him back to Earth. He is alive, and his feet are moving," Anatoly Grigoryev of the Russian Academy of Sciences told RIA Novosti.

The buzzing bug was part of a larger experiment in which bacteria, barley seeds, small crustaceans and larval insects were placed in a container strapped to the exterior of the space station, which orbits in zero gravity about 200 miles above the surface of the Earth.

From the RIA Novosti report, it wasn't clear if the insect which may in fact be a non-biting midge rather than a mosquito was placed in the container in the larval or the adult stage.

A European Space Agency experiment last fall found that primitive animals called tardigrades, also known as water bears, survived an even harsher exposure to space, including full vacuum and direct solar ultraviolet blasts. Moreover, several of the surviving tardigrades were able to normally reproduce.

I predict a bad Sci-Fi Horror movie comes true.

sushi
Feb 24, 2009, 06:05 PM
Surprised about the mosquito.

Water bears are awesome. :)

Aeolius
Feb 24, 2009, 06:52 PM
I predict a bad Sci-Fi Horror movie comes true.

Mansquito!!!

PlaceofDis
Feb 24, 2009, 06:58 PM
interesting. wonder what would happen to a roach.

sushi
Feb 24, 2009, 07:03 PM
interesting. wonder what would happen to a roach.
With or without his head? They can live headless for quite a while. Amazing.

PlaceofDis
Feb 24, 2009, 07:05 PM
With or without his head? They can live headless for quite a while. Amazing.

with its head and healthy. be interesting to see what sort of conditions it could survive in.

sushi
Feb 24, 2009, 07:31 PM
with its head and healthy. be interesting to see what sort of conditions it could survive in.
A cockroach is like the superman of the insect world. :)

yojitani
Feb 24, 2009, 09:15 PM
A cockroach is like the superman of the insect world. :)

Too many Lois Lane's if you ask me...

AmbitiousLemon
Feb 25, 2009, 08:11 AM
Surprised about the mosquito.

Water bears are awesome. :)

demi only link :p (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=321920)

A cockroach is like the superman of the insect world. :)

Actually roaches didn't fair as well as flour beetles (http://www.hindu.com/seta/2008/02/28/stories/2008022850671500.htm) although we all know space roaches are more kickass that terrestrial roaches. (http://en.rian.ru/science/20080117/97179313.html)

sushi
Feb 25, 2009, 08:56 AM
Too many Lois Lane's if you ask me...
Snort! Hadn't thought of that.

demi only link :p (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=321920)
Cool. Thanks! :)

Actually roaches didn't fair as well as flour beetles (http://www.hindu.com/seta/2008/02/28/stories/2008022850671500.htm) although we all know space roaches are more kickass that terrestrial roaches. (http://en.rian.ru/science/20080117/97179313.html)
You are scaring the children. :p

Next thing you know, we'll have a roach that can survive re-entry. :eek:

snberk103
Feb 25, 2009, 10:08 AM
interesting. wonder what would happen to a roach.

Think about this.... do you really want to know? Wouldn't you rather be able to sleep well at night? :)

Sdashiki
Feb 25, 2009, 10:14 AM
How scientific of an experiment could it have been when the "scientists" didnt even have the actual insect being used correct?! :confused:

ChrisA
Feb 25, 2009, 11:23 AM
How scientific of an experiment could it have been when the "scientists" didnt even have the actual insect being used correct?! :confused:

More likely the it was "Journalists" who didn't know. What we are reading is a story where the journalist did his research by reading another new story. I seriously doubt some guy who writes for the Internet bothered to hire Russian translator and make the 2:00 am phone call to Moscow to ask the scientist.

sushi
Feb 25, 2009, 11:24 AM
Think about this.... do you really want to know? Wouldn't you rather be able to sleep well at night? :)
Now that you put it this way, maybe not. :p

Old Muley
Feb 25, 2009, 12:11 PM
I for one welcome our new Mosquito/Flour Beetle/Water Bear overlords.

Jaffa Cake
Feb 25, 2009, 01:37 PM
When it's stomping Tokyo into piles of rubble, then we'll be sorry.

AmbitiousLemon
Feb 25, 2009, 01:53 PM
When it's stomping Tokyo into piles of rubble, then we'll be sorry.

Sounds like Tokyo will be sorry... ;)

sushi
Feb 25, 2009, 06:15 PM
Sounds like Tokyo will be sorry... ;)
Why can't it be New York city this time?

Godzirra is not going to like this. :p

Mr. lax
Feb 25, 2009, 09:05 PM
Question: How did it survive without food?

Don't most things normally die fairly quickly without food?

Abstract
Feb 26, 2009, 12:01 AM
Has anyone seen Jeff Goldblum recently?

GorillaPaws
Feb 26, 2009, 12:16 AM
Does anyone know if/how this news impacts the Drake Equation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation)?