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waloshin
Feb 26, 2009, 08:45 PM
I have a ibook g3 500mhz dual usb with a cdrom drive. The sticker underneath the keyboard says ibook g3 500mhz, 128mb, cdrom. Does that mean the ibook has 128mb of ram soldered on the motherboard from factory?

How well would this ibook with 640mb's of ram do with Ubuntu?

And what is that button on the top between the f5 and f6 keys? It appears to have a hole in it? And why does the caps lock look to have a hole in it to? You may ask why i am asking these questions is because i just received this laptop in the mail and am waiting for a power supply to boot the thing up!

Thanks!



Davy.Shalom
Feb 26, 2009, 08:49 PM
I have a ibook g3 500mhz dual usb with a cdrom drive. The sticker underneath the keyboard says ibook g3 500mhz, 128mb, cdrom. Does that mean the ibook has 128mb of ram soldered on the motherboard from factory?

How well would this ibook with 640mb's of ram do with Ubuntu?

And what is that button on the top between the f5 and f6 keys? It appears to have a hole in it? And why does the caps lock look to have a hole in it to? You may ask why i am asking these questions is because i just received this laptop in the mail and am waiting for a power supply to boot the thing up!

Thanks!

I honestly wouldn't advise running ubuntu on that even with 640 RAM. It would work but you wouldn't be able to do a whole lot. I think 10.3 (panther) is your best bet with that old a processor and motherboard.

Also, the whole in the caps lock key is for a light so you know its on when you press it. Try it when you get your power supply.

NewMacbookPlz
Feb 26, 2009, 08:54 PM
Panther.

The light at the top of the keyboard is to tell you when "Num Lock" is turned on, turning the letters with numeric sub-labels into the number keys.

OrangeSVTguy
Feb 27, 2009, 09:54 PM
That machine will run Tiger pretty decently once you add the 512mb of PC100/133 sodimm. Panther will probably be better though.

There are a few things in Tiger that you can disable to speed it up like Dashboard and Spotlight. Don't expect too much besides email and browsing non-flash sites. 8mb of VRAM isn't going to be much anyways. You'll might want to consider upgrading the old and probably dying 4,200rpm drive with a larger capacity 5400 or 7200 RPM drive. That comes with what a 10gb stock?

commops106
Feb 28, 2009, 10:57 AM
Just got a ibook 600 20gb hard drive, when restoring tiger it reports only 14.1 gb, what happened to the other 5.9 gb??? Can I get it back

OrangeSVTguy
Feb 28, 2009, 08:16 PM
Just got a ibook 600 20gb hard drive, when restoring tiger it reports only 14.1 gb, what happened to the other 5.9 gb??? Can I get it back


This has been discussed a million times...


Hard drive showing wrong capacity? Here's why.
Since we get numerous threads on this subject, I thought I would post this and sticky it.. hope it helps understand why hard drives don't format to their advertised capacity.

Determining drive capacity can be confusing at times because of the different measurement standards that are often used. When dealing with Windows and Mac based systems, you will commonly see both decimal measurements and binary measurements of a drive's capacity. In either case, a drive's capacity is measured by using the total number of bytes available on the drive. As long as the drive displays the correct number of bytes (approximate), you are getting the drive's full capacity.

Decimal vs. Binary:
For simplicity and consistency, hard drive manufacturers define a megabyte as 1,000,000 bytes and a gigabyte as 1,000,000,000 bytes. This is a decimal (base 10) measurement and is the industry standard. However, certain system BIOSs, FDISK and Windows define a megabyte as 1,048,576 bytes and a gigabyte as 1,073,741,824 bytes. Mac systems also use these values. These are binary (base 2) measurements.

To Determine Decimal Capacity:
A decimal capacity is determined by dividing the total number of bytes, by the number of bytes per gigabyte (1,000,000,000 using base 10).

To Determine Binary Capacity:
A binary capacity is determined by dividing the total number of bytes, by the number of bytes per gigabyte (1,073,741,824 using base 2).
This is why different utilities will report different capacities for the same drive. The number of bytes is the same, but a different number of bytes is used to make a megabyte and a gigabyte. This is similar to the difference between 0 degrees Celsius and 32 degrees Fahrenheit. It is the same temperature, but will be reported differently depending on the scale you are using.



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Various Drive Sizes and their Binary and Decimal Capacities



Drive Size in GB Approximate Total Bytes Decimal Capacity
(bytes/1,000,000,000)
Approximate Binary Capacity (bytes/1,073,724,841)
10 GB 10,000,000,000 10 GB 9.31 GB
20 GB 20,000,000,000 20 GB 18.63 GB
30 GB 30,000,000,000 30 GB 27.94 GB
40 GB 40,000,000,000 40 GB 37.25 GB
60 GB 60,000,000,000 60 GB 55.88 GB
80 GB 80,000,000,000 80 GB 74.51 GB
100 GB 100,000,000,000 100 GB 93.13 GB
120 GB 120,000,000,000 120 GB 111.76 GB
160 GB 160,000,000,000 160 GB 149.01 GB
180 GB 180,000,000,000 180 GB 167.64 GB
200 GB 200,000,000,000 200 GB 186.26 GB
250 GB 250,000,000,000 250 GB 232.83 GB