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SebZen
Feb 7, 2010, 02:42 PM
So devs are going to make iPhone apps compatible with iPad, but will we need to buy the iPad Editions for that?

For example with Brushes, I have the iPhone version. Will the dev just add support for iPad, or will he be releasing a separate iPad app?

That would suck



Night Spring
Feb 7, 2010, 02:45 PM
If you don't want to shell out the extra bucks, you can always just use the iPhone version on the iPad. Of course, you wouldn't get the extra iPad-only features, but you get what you pay for.

jbellanca
Feb 7, 2010, 02:46 PM
In some cases yes, in some cases no. Developers can, if they choose it, create universal binary apps with both iPhone and iPad versions in the same app. In that case, you'd buy it once and it will have both the iPad-specifc and iPhone-specific apps in one package. Or, developers could break them down into two apps, in which case you'd have to buy them separately. Dev's might want to do this for three reasons: (1) to charge twice and make more money; (2) keep costs for each version low, so people who buy one version don't subsidize the cost of the other version; or, (3) to keep the size of the apps low and under the 10mb threshold so they can be download over the air to increase impulse purchases. Of course there's reasons for producing a universal binary, too. Short answer: you'll see apps that do it both ways.

SebZen
Feb 7, 2010, 02:47 PM
If you don't want to shell out the extra bucks, you can always just use the iPhone version on the iPad. Of course, you wouldn't get the extra iPad-only features, but you get what you pay for.

That doesn't answer the question. We know we have a choice to re-buy or not...

But will devs add the promised iPad features to the apps or release them as separate iPad edition apps?

macmacey
Feb 7, 2010, 02:47 PM
So devs are going to make iPhone apps compatible with iPad, but will we need to buy the iPad Editions for that?

For example with Brushes, I have the iPhone version. Will the dev just add support for iPad, or will he be releasing a separate iPad app?

That would suck

It depends on the developer. They can either combine the apps or have separate apps. If the app is optimized for the iPad, expect to pay more for it as either a separate app or an in-app purchase. I'm hoping that in-app purchase of an iPad package becomes the norm as that seems the most convenient for the user and keeps the price of the iPhone-only version down.

SebZen
Feb 7, 2010, 02:51 PM
It depends on the developer. They can either combine the apps or have separate apps. If the app is optimized for the iPad, expect to pay more for it as either a separate app or an in-app purchase. I'm hoping that in-app purchase of an iPad package becomes the norm as that seems the most convenient for the user and keeps the price of the iPhone-only version down.

:mad::mad: if that's the case then no way I'm buying an iPad. I was sold on it. But I got a touch 3 weeks ago and spent about $80 worth on apps already. When I heard about the iPad I was going to return the touch and use that money on the iPad.

I'm not going to repurchase all those apps, screw that.

colmaclean
Feb 7, 2010, 02:51 PM
I guess it will be up to the individual developer and also how Apple set up the App Store.

Maybe the same app will be listed twice, the enhanced iPad version costing more, available for an upgrade fee if you already own the iPhone version.

You can always use the original iPhone version on the iPad.

melman101
Feb 7, 2010, 02:52 PM
I'm a developer, and it would just be easier for me to release an iPad only app as opposed to an iPhone / iPad combo app. That way, I can keep the code separate, and each device really is different. That being said, I most likely, will not repackage the same apps for iPad. I will want to create new stuff made just for the iPad.

colmaclean
Feb 7, 2010, 02:54 PM
:mad::mad: if that's the case then no way I'm buying an iPad. I was sold on it. But I got a touch 3 weeks ago and spent about $80 worth on apps already. When I heard about the iPad I was going to return the touch and use that money on the iPad.

I'm not going to repurchase all those apps, screw that.

You'll be able to run all those iPhone apps on the iPad, just not enhanced.

Do you take old DVDs back to the shop and demand Blu-Ray versions for free? :)

TraceyS/FL
Feb 7, 2010, 02:57 PM
:mad::mad: if that's the case then no way I'm buying an iPad. I was sold on it. But I got a touch 3 weeks ago and spent about $80 worth on apps already. When I heard about the iPad I was going to return the touch and use that money on the iPad.

I'm not going to repurchase all those apps, screw that.

If the developer chooses to go with the DLC model, then it will be your CHOICE to upgrade if you feel the features warrant the additional cost.

I was reading something on this on Touch Arcade and for games at least, it seemed like the DLC method was going to be the preferred way of handling.

But like others have pointed out - your Apps work now and will work on it, just maybe not as cool as the updates. If you like them, then pay for the update!

admanimal
Feb 7, 2010, 02:58 PM
:mad::mad: if that's the case then no way I'm buying an iPad. I was sold on it. But I got a touch 3 weeks ago and spent about $80 worth on apps already. When I heard about the iPad I was going to return the touch and use that money on the iPad.

I'm not going to repurchase all those apps, screw that.

Keep in mind that you can still use every one of those apps as-is on the iPad, they just won't be iPad-optimized. Then if there is a developer that decides to charge for an iPad version, you can choose whether to upgrade or not.

On a related note, I hope that in general people are willing to pay for well-done iPad versions of iPhone software. We need to support developers who put in the extra effort of using the extra power and screen space of the iPad to really enhance their apps rather than just kind of scaling up the interface without really adding anything (not to be confused with the automatic scaling that the iPad does).

SebZen
Feb 7, 2010, 03:12 PM
Keep in mind that you can still use every one of those apps as-is on the iPad, they just won't be iPad-optimized. Then if there is a developer that decides to charge for an iPad version, you can choose whether to upgrade or not.

On a related note, I hope that in general people are willing to pay for well-done iPad versions of iPhone software. We need to support developers who put in the extra effort of using the extra power and screen space of the iPad to really enhance their apps rather than just kind of scaling up the interface without really adding anything (not to be confused with the automatic scaling that the iPad does).

Yes, you can use the apps on the iPad, but either they'll be tiny (good luck playing something like Zombieville on it unless you have 7 inch long thumbs), or upscale it and have pixelated graphics and close to unreadable text.

About the DLC: can you link to the article? Paying, say, $.20-.50 for an iPad upgrade would be fair, but not rebuying the whole app

admanimal
Feb 7, 2010, 03:15 PM
About the DLC: can you link to the article? Paying, say, $.20-.50 for an iPad upgrade would be fair, but not rebuying the whole app

Well the cheapest anything can be is 99 cents.

SebZen
Feb 7, 2010, 03:18 PM
Well the cheapest anything can be is 99 cents.

So, rebuying.. since the majority of apps cost 99 cents. Not much of a "DLC" there

jazz1
Feb 7, 2010, 03:27 PM
I would not mind re-buying apps. that I really use. If it is left up to each developer this is going to get confusing. Do you think an app. designed for the iPhone or iTouch might offer some kind of an upgrade notice if you ran it on an iPad? Probably too messy for Apple.

marksman
Feb 7, 2010, 03:40 PM
It will likely be up to the individual developer.

I will say any developer who charges again for the iPad application without making significant changes (beyond just maximizing it for the larger screen), is not going to have a fan in me.

Developers need to realize this is a chance to earn some good will and positive word of mouth about how they deal with consumers, and I think it would be a mistake to money grab.

If a developer comes up with a significantly enhanced and advanced product then I certainly think they should market it and sell it as such.

Mad Mac Maniac
Feb 7, 2010, 03:46 PM
So, rebuying.. since the majority of apps cost 99 cents. Not much of a "DLC" there

For all the cheap fart apps sure, but then what's another $1? If I bought a game or utility app for like 10 bucks and then I had the option to upgrade it for like 5 bucks, I would probably hop on that.

I think it depends how much the developer has to redesign the app. For example if they keep it basically the same just upscale it for a larger screen then that could be a simple $1-2 upgrade, but if they decided to work from the ground up and redesign the app to make use of the full ipad, then I would expect to have to rebuy the app. Maybe get a 25-50% discount at most.

SebZen
Feb 7, 2010, 03:52 PM
Ah.

Hmm, if devs add free true fullscreen support for free I will be happy.

robbieduncan
Feb 7, 2010, 03:53 PM
Ah.

Hmm, if devs add free true fullscreen support for free I will be happy.

And if people just send developers money for no good reason they'll be happy. I fail to see why any developer should put hours, days or weeks of work in for no return.

Night Spring
Feb 7, 2010, 03:58 PM
Ah.

Hmm, if devs add free true fullscreen support for free I will be happy.

"Just" upscaling an app isn't so easy. See this article for some of the complexities involved.
http://toucharcade.com/2010/01/31/ancient-frog-on-ipad-developer-thoughts/

SebZen
Feb 7, 2010, 04:11 PM
"Just" upscaling an app isn't so easy. See this article for some of the complexities involved.
http://toucharcade.com/2010/01/31/ancient-frog-on-ipad-developer-thoughts/

Ah, I see. Guess that's out of the question then.

Bummer

Ruahrc
Feb 7, 2010, 04:56 PM
Maybe I just have a bad attitude, but I forsee that many (i.e. most) paid apps will require a re-buy or some kind of payment to get an enhanced iPad version. For some software this cost will be worth it, as they will likely add in meaningful functionality and enhanced visuals. For others, however, the changes made will probably be minimal and the price charged will be high, and it won't be worth it.

Alongside the universal binary thing, is it possible to package apps as two products, but sold as one unit? So you would not have to waste space on your iPad/iPod holding universal binaries for the iPod/iPad, the developer could create two binaries and sell them as one. So pay $15 to get both versions (as separate downloads), and then if you only own one device or don't want both, you can get the either/or version for $10 or something.

Ruahrc

Night Spring
Feb 7, 2010, 05:04 PM
Alongside the universal binary thing, is it possible to package apps as two products, but sold as one unit? So you would not have to waste space on your iPad/iPod holding universal binaries for the iPod/iPad,

I doubt it'll work that way. My guess would be that your computer will hold both versions, but only the compatible version would get installed on your ipod/ipad.

vini-vidi-vici
Feb 7, 2010, 05:09 PM
... the developer could create two binaries and sell them as one. So pay $15 to get both versions (as separate downloads), and then if you only own one device or don't want both, you can get the either/or version for $10 or something.

Ruahrc

My guess is that's how it'll go down... buy a $2 iPhone App, a $3 iPad version, or both (separate downloads) for $4. I'm sure it'll depend on the apps though. Existing apps for the iPhone might have a different pricing model for iPad versions than brand new apps.

I have a lot of apps for my iPod Touch, but really only a dozen or so that I really use... and fewer still that I think I'll use on the iPad. Those are the ones I'd "upgrade". For the rest, if I really want them, I can 2x them. Then, I'm sure there will be a class of apps I'll only want for the iPad, for which an iPhone version simply doesn't exist.

Bodhi395
Mar 2, 2010, 07:33 AM
I have an iphone now and there are a number of apps available in the app store I'd like to buy to use on my iphone now and then later use on an ipad I'm planning on buying. My question is if I buy say Scrabble(or any other app) for iphone now, I know I can use the iphone version on the ipad, BUT can I also get a free upgrade to the ipad optimized version whenever that comes out, since I bought it originally?

It would really suck if I had a bunch of paid apps for the iphone and then would have to buy them again to have the ipad optimized versions.

Eso
Mar 2, 2010, 07:37 AM
My question is if I buy say Scrabble(or any other app) for iphone now, I know I can use the iphone version on the ipad, BUT can I also get a free upgrade to the ipad optimized version whenever that comes out, since I bought it originally?

No. (Except for the free apps.)

Mark my words.

MacDawg
Mar 2, 2010, 07:38 AM
We will have to wait and see when the iPad and apps come out
I would say it would depend on the individual app and developer

But I am guessing "no"

robbieduncan
Mar 2, 2010, 07:43 AM
You might want to read the existing thread on this (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=861291) (I have requested that the Moderators merge this to there).

As a developer with a single iPhone app (as I am very lazy) I would say that this will depend on the level of effort required. If I update my one tiny app then it will be free but if I had a larger, more complex app that would take > 1 man-day to update I'd expect to be paid for that effort.

Upgrades to an enhanced version are not a right...

Chupa Chupa
Mar 2, 2010, 07:59 AM
It would really suck if I had a bunch of paid apps for the iphone and then would have to buy them again to have the ipad optimized versions.

But you bought an iPhone version (which is iPad compatible) so why would you expect a free iPad optimized version? When you buy s/w version 1.0 do you usually get a free copy of version 2.0? No. Maybe a discount or a rebate, but rarely a free upgrade. So why is this any different? I mean we are not just talking about a new version, but a new platform.

Bodhi395
Mar 2, 2010, 08:10 AM
But you bought an iPhone version (which is iPad compatible) so why would you expect a free iPad optimized version? When you buy s/w version 1.0 do you usually get a free copy of version 2.0? No. Maybe a discount or a rebate, but rarely a free upgrade. So why is this any different? I mean we are not just talking about a new version, but a new platform.

I guess you're right, unless it really does take hardly any time to update the app, like an earlier poster said. The consequence will be alot of people will continue to use non-ipad optimized apps on their ipad just to save money. Which will create a less than ideal user interface most likely, although that's a persons choice.

This also makes me think about something, and its probably already been addressed somewhere but I don't know. Will the ipad specific apps be backwards compatible with the iphone/ipod touch?

Julien
Mar 2, 2010, 08:15 AM
...The consequence will be alot of people will continue to use non-ipad optimized apps on their ipad just to save money. Which will create a less than ideal user interface most likely, although that's a persons choice....

So you will spend $500 or more for a new iPad and not spend a few $s for iPad specific software "...just to save (a little) money..." and suffer with a "...less than ideal user interface..."? :confused: Please explain your logic (or lack of)?:D

robbieduncan
Mar 2, 2010, 08:16 AM
This also makes me think about something, and its probably already been addressed somewhere but I don't know. Will the ipad specific apps be backwards compatible with the iphone/ipod touch?

If the user interface is designed for the iPad the the developer has to design a completely different user interface for the iPhone (and basically the other way round too). As the iPad supports extra UI elements at the very least the code that supports the UI needs to be somewhat different between the two apps. A well designed app should be able to re-use it's model and some of it's controller layer without issue.

That said even the model layer may require updating. For example my very simple app pulls data off the web. On the iPhone it only needs to pull one page/source at once. As you can only display one on screen. On the iPad this might well not be the case: the screen is big enough to support two or three. So the code that pulls the data would have to be redesigned from the ground up to allow parallel pulls or to queue up pulls as required...

melman101
Mar 2, 2010, 08:32 AM
As a developer, I can tell you, Local LTD will work on iPhone and have an enhanced iPad version in the same app. It's really up to the developer. I would say most developers will create iPad specific apps, but some will create a Universal Binary. I am creating a Universal Binary for Local LTD.

I don't think it will happen with games though as I think the developers will most likely create iPad specific versions of their games.

sushi
Mar 2, 2010, 08:38 AM
We will have to wait and see when the iPad and apps come out
I would say it would depend on the individual app and developer

But I am guessing "no"
Agree. Agree. And agree.

I would expect developers to continue to update the iPhone/iPod touch version for free. And according the keynote, almost all will run on the iPad as is.

For iPad specific versions, if they are just screen tweaks, probably for free. If they are basically new versions that utilize the extras screen real estate in new ways, then my guess is that we'll have to pay for the new iPad version.

Be interesting to see how this plays out.

pirateRACE
Mar 2, 2010, 08:38 AM
I already have a sneaking suspicion that this is gonna be like HDTV for me... I won't want to use any iPhone (Standard Def) Apps on my iPad and I'll be a snob about it. :D:apple:

anthonymoody
Mar 2, 2010, 08:43 AM
How flexible/powerful is the App Store pricing engine? Specifically, without too much pain could devs offer both a trade-up price for existing users alongside a (presumably higher) price for new users?

Bodhi395
Mar 2, 2010, 08:50 AM
So you will spend $500 or more for a new iPad and not spend a few $s for iPad specific software "...just to save (a little) money..." and suffer with a "...less than ideal user interface..."? :confused: Please explain your logic (or lack of)?:D

Well, when you put it that way I guess alot of people that have the money to spend on an ipad will have the money to upgrade. It will also depend on the app, so that an expensive app like slingplayer or some games people still might not want to spend the money to upgrade.

This also brings up the issue of whether people will pay more for ipad specific apps than for their iphone counterparts. So say a game like Madden for ipad might cost $20, and the iphone one only $10, since you are getting the better user interface of a large screen and its easier to play than on a little phone. I could see the price points being iphone games= $10, ipad games=$20-25, Mac games=$40-50.

G4R2
Mar 2, 2010, 08:56 AM
The flip side to this discussion is that there are a lot of iPhone apps that I wouldn't consider paying for on the iPad simply because they weren't very useful to me.

The iPhone, to some degree, is a bit like a low cost proving ground. Considering all the apps I have purchased I doubt the total price has exceeded $200, if even. And yet the cost/benefit ratio of that expense easily exceeds most of my desktop software purchases by several orders of magnitude, with the exception of some key applications (any one of which cost more then all my iPhone app purchases combined).

The iPhone has served as a pre-filter for me that will really help me determine what will be worth buying should a more expensive iPad version be released. This is important because I do have a sense that the iPad marketplace will differ from the iPhone marketplace in that the price for iPad specific apps will stabilize at a higher equilibrium point then iPhone apps (due to a smaller potential market, more potential complexity, and presumably a higher cost for development) and that there will be apps that make sense on the iPad and don't on the iPhone.

Night Spring
Mar 2, 2010, 09:40 AM
How flexible/powerful is the App Store pricing engine? Specifically, without too much pain could devs offer both a trade-up price for existing users alongside a (presumably higher) price for new users?

The App Store doesn't offer a way for developers to distinguish between new and existing users, so I'd say no. This is a weakness of the App Store -- developers often come up with a significant update of their app, and would like to offer it to their existing users at a discount, but there's no way to do it. They either have to "give away" the upgrade to their existing users for free, or they have to put it into the App Store as a separate app, forcing their users to re-purchase the upgrade at the same price as new users.

wyneken
Mar 2, 2010, 03:36 PM
The consequence will be alot of people will continue to use non-ipad optimized apps on their ipad just to save money. Which will create a less than ideal user interface most likely, although that's a persons choice.

I have a different prediction. People buy new iPhone apps all the time. I mean, ALL the time. When they get an iPad, they'll start spending this money on shiny new iPad apps. Did you say you'd spent $80 on iPhone apps? Well, in a few months, even without the iPad, you'd have spent another $80 on new iPhone apps. Now you'll probably buy iPad apps instead. Or both.

Most people who own both devices will end up with two different app collections. For the most part, they'll be separate collections -- e.g. games you play on the phone and games you play on the Pad. But there will be two categories of overlap:

• iPhone apps that work well and look pretty good on the iPad, but aren't worth spending extra money on.
• iPhone apps that you like SO much, or use so regularly, that you'll just shell out the extra bucks for an iPad version.

It's not like we're talking about huge sums of money. Maybe people who are used to getting apps for .99 or 2.99 or -- take a deep breath -- 5.99 don't remember when apps for "real" computers cost forty or fifty bucks or more. This is probably why I've got 8 screens worth of apps most of which I never even look at. Most of them cost less than a coffee at Starbucks.

derryquinn
Mar 2, 2010, 03:38 PM
You are honestly the cheapest person I've ever seen. I'm flabbergasted at how ridiculous you're being in relation to your sense of entitlement when it comes to a developer's job.

Bodhi395
Mar 2, 2010, 07:15 PM
You are honestly the cheapest person I've ever seen. I'm flabbergasted at how ridiculous you're being in relation to your sense of entitlement when it comes to a developer's job.

Who are you referring to?

fraggot
Mar 2, 2010, 09:11 PM
You'll be able to run all those iPhone apps on the iPad, just not enhanced.

Do you take old DVDs back to the shop and demand Blu-Ray versions for free? :)

Couldn't have said it better myself haha

PlayHard
Mar 2, 2010, 09:32 PM
Honestly, I fully expect to re-purchase apps. For the ones that are worth it, I don't see a problem. I actually am surprised developers continue to update and improve some of their apps given that they charge such a small amount yet are continually expected to update their apps for free. I think it's only fair for them to get paid. For me the best part of the iPhone are the cool apps. I think we should all support their development.

Vizin
Mar 2, 2010, 09:58 PM
One reason this might happen is the 3.2 issue. iPad-optimized apps (including universal apps) will have to target iPhone OS 3.2 minimum, which will presumably also be available for iPhone/iPod touch.

Since users are generally slow to adopt new OS versions, this isn't very appealing, since you'd have to cut out a potentially huge market of existing iPhone/touch owners to sell to iPad owners.

A possible solution would be for Apple to allow devs to upload separate binaries for separate OS versions. If you have 3.2, you get the universal binary.

Lots of apps still target 2.x for this reason.

admanimal
Mar 2, 2010, 10:11 PM
One reason this might happen is the 3.2 issue. iPad-optimized apps (including universal apps) will have to target iPhone OS 3.2 minimum, which will presumably also be available for iPhone/iPod touch.

Since users are generally slow to adopt new OS versions, this isn't very appealing, since you'd have to cut out a potentially huge market of existing iPhone/touch owners to sell to iPad owners.

A possible solution would be for Apple to allow devs to upload separate binaries for separate OS versions. If you have 3.2, you get the universal binary.

Lots of apps still target 2.x for this reason.

This is not the case. It is possible to target an app to 3.2 in order to take advantage of iPad features but have the base SDK be 3.0 so that it still works on earlier versions. It just requires some extra code to determine at run-time which API calls are available and possibly weak linking certain frameworks. The same can be done so that OS 2.0-compatible apps can take advantage of OS 3.0 features.

fraggot
Mar 3, 2010, 10:39 AM
People seem to be far too surprised by this model, even from people who own Macs. Most applications for the Mac usually make you upgrade to the newest version of Mac before their updates will even work.

They add new features to the OS that people want to take advantage of leaving the 10.4 users and such in the dust. This is nothing really new yet everyone is oh so surprised.

Mactagonist
Mar 3, 2010, 11:33 AM
The App Store doesn't offer a way for developers to distinguish between new and existing users, so I'd say no. This is a weakness of the App Store -- developers often come up with a significant update of their app, and would like to offer it to their existing users at a discount, but there's no way to do it. They either have to "give away" the upgrade to their existing users for free, or they have to put it into the App Store as a separate app, forcing their users to re-purchase the upgrade at the same price as new users.

Couldnt the developers simply make the newer features or update unlockable via an in app purchase?

Existing users keep what they pay for and have the option to pay for more, new users can buy the new app and then the newer features if they want.

I dont like that model personally because it is overly complex and eliminates the what you see is what you get pricing that is (IMHO) an advantage to Apples store.

Personally, I hope that market pressures force most developers to offer free or minimally priced upgrades to iPad compatible apps. While there is additional work involved in making an iPad version they are also gaining access to a new and untapped pool of potential buyers that should offset the labor necessary to port the app from iPhone to iPad.

Macpowered
Mar 3, 2010, 01:18 PM
Do you take old DVDs back to the shop and demand Blu-Ray versions for free?

QFT!

mac jones
Mar 3, 2010, 01:26 PM
I would imagine they will try to milk you for every possible nickle

(just a wild guess) :rolleyes:

SchneiderMan
Mar 3, 2010, 01:36 PM
So how would we know about an app that is iPad only? Would all the apps that are made for the iPad have "iPad" in the title?

admanimal
Mar 3, 2010, 01:50 PM
So how would we know about an app that is iPad only? Would all the apps that are made for the iPad have "iPad" in the title?

Someone said in the keynote that there will be a special section for iPad apps. Plus apps already list the devices they are compatible with on their App Store pages.

/dev/toaster
Mar 3, 2010, 03:44 PM
Any developer who makes me buy an app again just for the iPad interface will never see another dime from me again.

Macpowered
Mar 3, 2010, 03:55 PM
Any developer who makes me buy an app again just for the iPad interface will never see another dime from me again.

So... I guess you will take all your old DVD's back to the store and demand Blu-Ray versions for free?

t0mat0
Mar 3, 2010, 05:34 PM
To answer the thread's title.
No, you won't have to. You don't have to buy any apps. Your choice.
The market is competitive, so i'd imagine there will be some push on the developers to do a good job -
Because for one, anyone using their iPhone apps on an iPad, may well down-rate the current app version, as it could look blocky.
So you might see a push for developers to at least sort the issue of scaling an iPhone app to an iPad.
As for iPad native apps - some will, some won't (e.g. see Scrivener. if they did one it'd totally be worth buying separately).

admanimal
Mar 3, 2010, 08:36 PM
Any developer who makes me buy an app again just for the iPad interface will never see another dime from me again.

So why should they even bother updating the apps at all?

sushi
Mar 10, 2010, 06:41 AM
Any developer who makes me buy an app again just for the iPad interface will never see another dime from me again.
This makes no sense at all.

So... I guess you will take all your old DVD's back to the store and demand Blu-Ray versions for free?
I believe that you may be on to something. :)

I have Omni Focus on my Mac and iPhone. It should run on the iPad fine. And that is good. If I want to purchase the new version that takes advantage of the iPad's larger screen, then I would expect to be required to pay for that new version. Now if Omni provides the iPad version for free, then that's great but not expected.

Mactagonist
Mar 10, 2010, 08:36 AM
So why should they even bother updating the apps at all?

Because they now have a whole new market with millions (potentially) of potential customers. Duh.

This is an opportunity for people who have already established a customer base on iPhone to grow that on a new platform. Do you really think everyone who buys an iPad already has an iPhone?

Mactagonist
Mar 12, 2010, 12:31 PM
So... I guess you will take all your old DVD's back to the store and demand Blu-Ray versions for free?

In light of some recent comments by people who are actually informed about the situation can we put this silly meme to bed?

Smule (tpain app, ocarnia, etc) CEO Jeff Smith interview with All things D:

money quote here (2:45 into the interview):


...
In contrast, Smith said that porting an iPhone app to the iPad only results in a 2, 3, or 4% increase in development costs as its the same OS wrapped a different form factor, which Smith notes is something they can factor into their code and ultimately have just 1 app for both platforms.
...


interview here: http://mediamemo.allthingsd.com/20100305/an-apple-app-star-explains-why-he-wont-work-with-android/

Any developer that takes the iPad launch as a chance to gouge customers who have already purchased their iPhone apps will be cutting their own throat in the marketplace.

TurboSC
Mar 12, 2010, 12:50 PM
It's in the developer's hands... each app will be different.

admanimal
Mar 12, 2010, 01:01 PM
It's in the developer's hands... each app will be different.

Exactly. Some apps will just get an interface update to better fit the iPad, while others might be able to add a whole bunch of new features given the extra screen space and processing power.

Luke Redpath
Mar 12, 2010, 01:06 PM
Its entirely up to the developer; I for one would hope that if a developer has spent significant time updating their app to take advantage of iPad features, that they won't just give the update away. The race to the bottom in iPhone pricing has already devalued apps.

I encourage iPad developers to charge a reasonable price for their apps (I would hope the average price is closer to the $10 mark).

Of course, Apple could make this a lot easier for developers by allowing developers to offer upgrade pricing.

Luke Redpath
Mar 12, 2010, 01:08 PM
:mad::mad: if that's the case then no way I'm buying an iPad. I was sold on it. But I got a touch 3 weeks ago and spent about $80 worth on apps already. When I heard about the iPad I was going to return the touch and use that money on the iPad.

I'm not going to repurchase all those apps, screw that.

You will not have to re-purchase apps you've already bought. They will not go away and they can be loaded onto your iPad as-is.

Luke Redpath
Mar 12, 2010, 01:12 PM
Any developer who makes me buy an app again just for the iPad interface will never see another dime from me again.

I doubt your custom will be missed.

AJsAWiz
Mar 12, 2010, 02:22 PM
You'll be able to run all those iPhone apps on the iPad, just not enhanced.

Do you take old DVDs back to the shop and demand Blu-Ray versions for free? :)

LMAO

ZBoater
Mar 12, 2010, 02:46 PM
Developers that work hard and enhance their apps to take advantage of the iPad deserve to be compensated for their efforts. All this talk about "free" stuff makes me wonder how good developers are supposed to make a living... :confused:

ThatsMeRight
Mar 12, 2010, 03:00 PM
:mad::mad: if that's the case then no way I'm buying an iPad. I was sold on it. But I got a touch 3 weeks ago and spent about $80 worth on apps already. When I heard about the iPad I was going to return the touch and use that money on the iPad.

I'm not going to repurchase all those apps, screw that.
All the apps you bought will work on the iPad ;)

xraydoc
Mar 12, 2010, 03:19 PM
Your iPod/iPhone apps will work on the iPad, with a few exceptions, according to Apple. No need to re-buy.

However, if a developer re-writes his (or her) whole app to take advantage of new iPad features and screen space, I have no problem paying for new versions.

First, the developer has to eat, too.

Secondly, how dare you think you're owed the app for free just because you bought something from Apple. Do you expect HD cable for free just because you bought a TV from Samsung?

Thirdly, the developer can charge whatever he wants. It's called capitalism. Don't like it, don't buy it.

Lastly, the most expensive iPhone app I ever bought was $9.99. After spending $600 on an iPad, is another $10 going to break the bank? If it does, then you probably should reconsider spending the hundreds of dollars in the first place.

The sense of entitlement some people have these days is amazing.

Phil A.
Mar 12, 2010, 03:49 PM
Hopefully the iPad will have a whole new range of apps that take advantage of it's extra size and not just slightly updated iPhone apps. On that basis, then they should be charged for. On a slightly related note, I hope the iPad puts an end to the "race to the bottom" that led to people thinking all apps should be $0.99 and complaining at $2.00 apps for being "too expensive".
I'd like to see a wide range of well produced, full featured apps that people are happy to pay more for (such as iWork).
If the iPad has a long term future as "more than a big iPod touch", then it will be the apps that help it truly deliver its potential and that doesn't mean 20,000 full screen fart apps!

admanimal
Mar 12, 2010, 03:51 PM
Hopefully the iPad will have a whole new range of apps that take advantage of it's extra size and not just slightly updated iPhone apps. On that basis, then they should be charged for. On a slightly related note, I hope the iPad puts an end to the "race to the bottom" that led to people thinking all apps should be $0.99 and complaining at $2.00 apps for being "too expensive".
I'd like to see a wide range of well produced, full featured apps that people are happy to pay more for (such as iWork).
If the iPad has a long term future as "more than a big iPod touch", then it will be the apps that help it truly deliver its potential and that doesn't mean 20,000 full screen fart apps!

I think we will see these higher quality apps eventually, although by their nature it might take a while for them to appear en masse. Apple has set a good example with iWork, it seems.

Phil A.
Mar 12, 2010, 03:57 PM
I think we will see these higher quality apps eventually, although by their nature it might take a while for them to appear en masse. Apple has set a good example with iWork, it seems.

They certainly have. At the moment, I'm holding off buying an iPad until I see what apps become available. Much as I would like one, there isn't a compelling reason to buy one for me yet (and in the current climate, I can't spend money as freely as I used to be able to!).

If it becomes the centre of a new ecosystem with a decent range of top quality apps then I'll get one in a heartbeat. If it becomes a 9.7" fart machine then I don't think I'll bother!

crisss1205
Mar 12, 2010, 03:58 PM
(3) to keep the size of the apps low and under the 10mb threshold so they can be download over the air to increase impulse purchases.

Isn't it 20MB now?

xIGmanIx
Mar 12, 2010, 04:02 PM
DVD's work on BD players, so just because he upgrades the hardware, should we have to repurchase the software?

So... I guess you will take all your old DVD's back to the store and demand Blu-Ray versions for free?

Don Kosak
Mar 12, 2010, 04:10 PM
In light of some recent comments by people who are actually informed about the situation can we put this silly meme to bed?

Smule (tpain app, ocarnia, etc) CEO Jeff Smith interview with All things D:
money quote here (2:45 into the interview):

interview here: http://mediamemo.allthingsd.com/20100305/an-apple-app-star-explains-why-he-wont-work-with-android/

Any developer that takes the iPad launch as a chance to gouge customers who have already purchased their iPhone apps will be cutting their own throat in the marketplace.

It depends on the app. Development time is only one of the costs.

As a developer, one of my biggest expenses is artwork. It costs $500 or more for a good piece of high resolution art. (I'm not talking about "pull my finger" applications or DIY clip art.)

If you're doing a game that has 75 pieces of iPhone sized art that all need to be redrawn at 1024x768 (or higher due to scrolling) that's a lot of money out of pocket to support a new iPad high-resolution version.

Maybe some big companies can make that up in "scale", but most small developers are going to have to cover costs somehow. So I expect many graphic intense applications will end up charging something for an iPad version.

Some small single screen utility apps, or text-based apps will get away with a quick "face-lift" in Interface Builder. You'll probably see a lot of these as universal iPhone/iPod/iPad apps.

Phil A.
Mar 12, 2010, 04:18 PM
DVD's work on BD players, so just because he upgrades the hardware, should we have to repurchase the software?

You can take a DVD you have bought and put it in a BD player without paying any more money. The BD Player will play it but it is still a DVD and will play at DVD resolution with DVD features. BD players will upscale the video to HD resolution but underneath it's still DVD resolution.

You can take an iPhone app you have bought and put it on the iPad without paying any more money. The iPad will run it just fine but it is still an iPhone app and will work at iPhone resolution with iPhone features. The iPad will upscale the screens to iPad resolution but underneath it's still iPhone resolution.

See a similarity there?
On this basis, why shouldn't you pay for iPad enhanced software that you already have in iPhone format? It's no different to buying a movie that you already have on DVD again on BluRay.

sushi
Mar 16, 2010, 09:04 AM
I would expect that developers who scale their app for the iPad won't charge.

However, I would expect developers who create completely new versions that take advantage of the larger screen space will charge for those versions.