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photocat
Oct 23, 2004, 03:14 AM
I am the happy owner of an iMac G5...
Oops, I forgot, I fried the machine. How – will you all ask me?
I got it on wednesday, went home with it, it was sitting on the living room table, ready to play.
I have been using macs for more then 10 years now, worked for a newspaper, well, I know macs.
I quickly browse through the manual, yup, this is plug and play. We don't expect anything less from apple.
I plug it into the wall and nothing happens. It is dead. Dead on arrival.
For the records, we live in UK, and my husband is an american so we ordered it in the States. It was shipped to our APO address.
I called the seller, and after lots of searching and elimination processes the verdict is that this apple machine is single voltage!!!!!
I gasp for breath, WHAT IS THIS? THIS MACHINE IS SINGLE VOLTAGE???
Indeed, I plugged in a 110 volt machine in the 220 volt main lines here in UK.
Searching the discussion pages from apple, I see the bleak reality.
I have to call my husband with the message "Honey, I fried the new computer"
How can this be?
Am I a dummy? No...
Am I stupid? No
Can I read? Yes

I call apple support in the States, they refer me to apple support UK,
Apple support UK can't do anything for me cause I bought it in the states.
Which leaves me without apple support.

I blame two parties for this:
First of all, apple puts old technology in a new machine.
I have an iBook and my husband bought the old iMac six months ago, they were plug and play and auto switch voltage, why would I start thinking this new machine would NOT have auto switch voltage?
Not all americans live in America, and the whole world does not live on 110 volt.
Secondly I blame the firm, we are known customers there. They had our APO AE address, so they knew we lived in Europe.
Is it too much to ask to put a label or sticker on the cord or on the cover of the manual that says "check voltage"?

I mean, I had a transfo in the house, it is not that we don't know these things, but there has to be a reasonable doubt before we pull that thing out of the closet.

So apple and the company who sold it to us made mistakes. I guess that more people overseas will have the same experience I have now.

My apple is now in a british store, where it will be fitted an auto switch voltage power supply. I hope it ends there, that only the power supply will have been damaged...

All in all, this has been an extremely frustrating week for us, and I am still waiting on my computer, cause no shop in UK has the power supplies in stock.

Apple, stop saving on a few dimes, and put an auto voltage switch in every single machine you sell...

:mad:

J.Allen
Oct 23, 2004, 03:23 AM
You've void the warrenty. (you should have checked the voltage, that's a noobie mistake, and you've said you've been using Mac's for years.)

best you can do is see how mush a new power supply is to buy. and since warrently is void you can install it yourself. Not sure if apple will let you do this though and you might have to pay instaltion.

Tough luck, but you can only blame yourself.

now part 2http://celica.net/ubb/graemlins/naughty.gif: Send it back to the USA to your husband, and get him to call apple and say that the powersupply gave up the ghost. you might be lucky.

evil_santa
Oct 23, 2004, 03:37 AM
the imac specs show duel voltage for both us (http://www.apple.com/imac/specs.html) & uk (http://www.apple.com/uk/imac/specs.html) machines, your imac may have been DOA. This is one of the pitfalls of getting a grey import, if you have a problem it is not covered by the warranty.


Electrical and environmental requirements


Meets ENERGY STAR requirements

Line voltage: 100-120V AC or 100-240V AC, depending on country of purchase

Frequency: 47Hz to 63Hz, single phase

Maximum continuous power: 180W

Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)

Storage temperature: -40° to 185° F (-40° to 85° C)

Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing

Maximum altitude: 10,000 feet

redbaron
Oct 23, 2004, 03:40 AM
But if Macs have been coming with auto switching power supplies for years (I think my old Classic II has one - I run it on 240v without any complaints, but I haven't checked whether it is switched or fixed), it would be reasonable to expect that the latest ones would. I reckon this is extreme slackness on Apple's part - why downgrade your technology?

caveman_uk
Oct 23, 2004, 03:52 AM
the imac specs show duel voltage for both us (http://www.apple.com/imac/specs.html) & uk (http://www.apple.com/uk/imac/specs.html) machines, your imac may have been DOA. This is one of the pitfalls of getting a grey import, if you have a problem it is not covered by the warranty.
That's not how I read that. I read it as 'depending upon your country of pruchase this machine will be either be 100-120V OR 100-240V'. It looks like the US machines are only 100-120V. My guess is the UK ones are dual voltage. The specs for the g4 imac(and ibook) say only 100-240V. I just looked them up.

I think you're all being a bit harsh seeing as the previous product WAS dual voltage regardless of where you lived. Yeah maybe she should have checked but it understandable she didn't. I mean how much extra does it cost apple to fit a dual voltage supply into all the machines rather just the non-US models?

johnnyjibbs
Oct 23, 2004, 04:17 AM
Is this Apple's way of screwing us over cheaper US imports?

photocat
Oct 23, 2004, 04:19 AM
That's not how I read that. I read it as 'depending upon your country of pruchase this machine will be either be 100-120V OR 100-240V'. It looks like the US machines are only 100-120V. My guess is the UK ones are dual voltage. The specs for the g4 imac(and ibook) say only 100-240V. I just looked them up.

I think you're all being a bit harsh seeing as the previous product WAS dual voltage regardless of where you lived. Yeah maybe she should have checked but it understandable she didn't. I mean how much extra does it cost apple to fit a dual voltage supply into all the machines rather just the non-US models?

I know I should have checked the voltage, it is just that you don't expect apple to put old technology in new machines.
The machines sold in the States and in Japan are preset voltage. All the other machines have auto switch.

My husband serves his country abroad, we are not here in UK for pleasure, (well, sort of, UK is great!!! So are the States for that matter), so I think it is reasonable to be a bit price aware. On big and expensive electronics, it is a lot cheaper for us to buy in the States. (Which makes me wonder why UK people have to pay double of americans for computers, but that is a total different issue).

We are used to be careful with voltage things, it is only that you don't expect a new machine to have that old technology.
I have tried apple support, but apple support usa points us to apple support UK, and apple support UK can't help us because we bought it in the States.

I also think it is very reasonable to expect either Apple or the Seller to make a little notice on a clear spot to put VOLTAGE CHECK, that way the surprises will be almost none.

You don't read the trouble shooting pages before you encounter trouble.
If I had done that, I would not have had troubles in the first place.

russed
Oct 23, 2004, 04:23 AM
surely, if it came from the american market it will have come with an american plug, that being one that wont work in the british plug sockets. that means you will have had to change the plug which will have already invalidated the warranty as you will have had to chop off a molded plug.

photocat
Oct 23, 2004, 04:32 AM
surely, if it came from the american market it will have come with an american plug, that being one that wont work in the british plug sockets. that means you will have had to change the plug which will have already invalidated the warranty as you will have had to chop off a molded plug.

We are used to have american appliances in the house, and we do have little adapter plugs all over the place.
If you buy an iBook, you get a set of different plugs with it, so they do keep foreign countries in mind when they produce those.
All i want is Apple to reconsider its design in this issue, being the dual voltage switch power supply, and not save a few box on a power supply that in se would benefit all users.
It is about user friendlyness and support for your customers, because it is the customers that make the market. Apple would not be Apple/the company it is today if it would not be for us buyers.

evil_santa
Oct 23, 2004, 07:01 AM
That's not how I read that. I read it as 'depending upon your country of pruchase this machine will be either be 100-120V OR 100-240V'. It looks like the US machines are only 100-120V. My guess is the UK ones are dual voltage. The specs for the g4 imac(and ibook) say only 100-240V. I just looked them up.


I took that as being switchable between 100-120v or 100-240v. My G4s spec reads the same & has a voltage switch next to the power socket.

Dr. Distortion
Oct 23, 2004, 07:29 AM
I took that as being switchable between 100-120v or 100-240v. My G4s spec reads the same & has a voltage switch next to the power socket.

Apple may have made a mistake on the website, it's more likely that it should read:

Line voltage: 100-120V AC or 200-240V AC, depending on country of purchase

just my 2c... this seems to be a most unusual and odd move by Apple, since I've seen laptop power supplies that were smaller than the iMac one that are also auto-sensing...

johnnyjibbs
Oct 23, 2004, 09:58 AM
Normally, if you use a US version, you'll be okay as long as you use the proper BRITISH power cord/adaptor. If you use the US one that comes with your US Mac with an adaptor shoved on the end of it, you could fry it, which is proabably what you did. If you had used the British iMac power adaptor with your US iMac, it probably would have been fine.

Foxer
Oct 23, 2004, 10:08 AM
It hurts me, as I type on my G5 iMac, to hear your story. I moved overseas for number of years and the first thing I plugged in (my wonderful dual system ex-stereo) was fried. I didn't know there was a switch I had to flip. I was scared everytime I plugged something in after that.

I'm no electrician, but I suspect that making something duel system requires a different power brick. All Macs come with power bricks of some sort(even the laptops). All Macs until the new iMac. The power brick is inside the bugger. I assume that it wasn't possible (ergo or techincally) to cram a brick for both systems in there. It's already pretty cramped.

Well, that's my theory. I feel real bad for you. I know that when you're opening a new mac, you're so excited that the last thing you're thinking about is power supply issues.

Music_Producer
Oct 23, 2004, 10:13 AM
Since I travel the world on music assignments, everytime I purchase an electronic product (usually musical instruments and pro audio gear) ..even an electric shaver, the first thing I do is look at the voltage settings. I have plenty of step up and step down transformers for that purpose. Apple, or any other company shouldn't have to place a "Check Voltage Settings Before Opening" on the box..I'm sure they will have it in the manual (usually the first page) I'm not surprised that they will not do anything about it. Thats like living in a relative poor country like India.. importing a BMW from the USA and before driving it..filling her up with diesel instead of unleaded fuel (just a comparison, however lame it might sound)

Voltage is the *first* thing I worry about when buying products from abroad. Yes, a lot of products do come with the 110-240 V operation, but I STILL use a transformer to convert the voltage settings to whatever the default would be for that country. Why take a chance?

The first time I took my pioneer cd recorder (1996) to a friend's house to show it off..he happily plugged it in the mains while I was messing with his drums..and fzzzt!!! He just looked at me and went "Oh sh$t!!!!! I forgot its 240 V here and the machine is 110V!!!" I almost passed out (I was a student then and could barely afford that machine) but he opened it and luckily, it was only the fuse that was busted, which we then replaced. Hope everything works out for you.

gekko513
Oct 23, 2004, 10:24 AM
It's an understandable thing to do, but I think it is also understandable that Apple uses non-auto-switching power supplies for the U.S. iMac.

The iMac is rather big and is not something people will bring with them on pleasure travels abroad, the iBook on the other hand is something that people will bring with them. That's why the iBook has an auto-switching power supply and not the iMac.

Doraemon
Oct 23, 2004, 10:30 AM
First of all, apple puts old technology in a new machine.
I have an iBook and my husband bought the old iMac six months ago, they were plug and play and auto switch voltage, why would I start thinking this new machine would NOT have auto switch voltage?

No US desktop Mac EVER has auto switch voltage.
Besides, it's not old technology. It's totally unnecessary to have auto switch voltage on a desktop computer. The number of owners who move to a country with a different voltage is so little, that it's economical nonsense to have such feature on a desktop computer.

Secondly I blame the firm, we are known customers there. They had our APO AE address, so they knew we lived in Europe.
Is it too much to ask to put a label or sticker on the cord or on the cover of the manual that says "check voltage"?
You ask for such a sticker and say that you're not a computer dummy? I'm sorry, but that's hilarious.

I blame two parties for this:
You should blame yourself.

So apple and the company who sold it to us made mistakes.
No. You did.

I guess that more people overseas will have the same experience I have now.

Not if they FIRST checked the specifications of their computer and read the manual before plugging a 110V computer into a 220V socket.

photocat
Oct 23, 2004, 12:35 PM
No US desktop Mac EVER has auto switch voltage.
Besides, it's not old technology. It's totally unnecessary to have auto switch voltage on a desktop computer. The number of owners who move to a country with a different voltage is so little, that it's economical nonsense to have such feature on a desktop computer.

Excuse me, the imac we bought six months ago is a desktop computer, the swivel with the round base, and that one has auto voltage. A lot of G4's are desktop computers and have auto voltage.
I would not call the American Forces Overseas a group to be associated with "economical nonsense". I would think that it would be economically easier for apple to just produce one model auto power supply then breaking the production up in two groups... The more one can automate tasks, and have uniform production schemes, the cheaper it comes for the producer.


You ask for such a sticker and say that you're not a computer dummy? I'm sorry, but that's hilarious.

Yeah, I am female too. Steve Jobbs uses stickies, maybe that is hilarious too????


You should blame yourself.

I do blame myself, more then anything. IF, IF, if my aunt had had wheels, she could have been a carriage... If I would have been a little bit less exited about the new arrival, I would probably not have had a blond moment.


No. You did.

yeah, right. chuckkle... It suddenly dawns on me why designers at Apple could have been so short sighted. Sort of a neanderthal thinking path...



Not if they FIRST checked the specifications of their computer and read the manual before plugging a 110V computer into a 220V socket.

Maybe we should put up a new law: "Read the trouble shooting section of the manual first, because by elimination you will deduct the right way to go." Never mind trust in apple and its products. No, we need to be suspicious instead of exited about a new product.

photocat
Oct 23, 2004, 12:41 PM
It hurts me, as I type on my G5 iMac, to hear your story. I moved overseas for number of years and the first thing I plugged in (my wonderful dual system ex-stereo) was fried. I didn't know there was a switch I had to flip. I was scared everytime I plugged something in after that.

I think I will not plug in for a LLLLLOOOONNGG time... It is nice to find a person who can understand my feelings right now.
:) :)

toughboy
Oct 23, 2004, 01:53 PM
I think I will not plug in for a LLLLLOOOONNGG time... It is nice to find a person who can understand my feelings right now.
:) :)

There is one more here, who definitely understands your feelings.. that just sucks.. I bought my iPod 3G and my Powerbook G4 from US when I visited and they both come with auto-switch adaptors.. and plus, I was thinking to buy a iMac G5 and make one of my close friend bring here, just because prices here in Turkey are so high because of the tax and dollar-euro currency difference.. and I'm lucky I read this thread.. so what can I do?.. ??? what will you do??

Rod Rod
Oct 23, 2004, 02:03 PM
what stinks is how many people just jumped all over the original poster.

just think about how you'd feel if the same thing happened to you.

"it'd never happen to me because I'm perfect." get over yourself if you think that way.

instead of offering support, a bunch of people posted arrogant, condescending and rude replies.

photocat had every reason to believe her latest, greatest iMac G5 had an auto-switching power supply, because her iMac G4 had one.

photocat, I hope you get your computer fixed under warranty.

keysersoze
Oct 23, 2004, 02:12 PM
what stinks is how many people just jumped all over the original poster.

Yeah, those people suck. I feel bad for the woman who fried her computer, regardless of anything else. Doing something like that is just plain bad. Don't have to make someone feel worse then they already do.

Good luck photocat.

caveman_uk
Oct 23, 2004, 02:51 PM
No US desktop Mac EVER has auto switch voltage.

She's already said her imac G4 was auto-switching. Are you calling her a liar?

iMeowbot
Oct 23, 2004, 03:06 PM
Yeah, this is how they were able to eliminate an external power brick in such a slim machine.

To get the same amount of power out of 115V, you need twice the amperage, and that produces more heat. Leaving out the extra windings for higher voltages makes cooling easier.

In 230V countries, the supply can run cooler and more windings aren't a problem.

[Adding]
So why, then, would the Euro-spec supplies allow operation at the lower voltages? The most sensible explanation would be that it does work, but the heat dissipation in that mode is closer to the safety margin than Apple's engineers wanted. The odds favor using a more easily cooled design, so that's exactly what US customers get. (In general that's how all electrical and electronic things are spec'd. It's not so much a yes-no question of if something will work as it is a statistics game.)

[and more]
So why is Apple so into statistics? They aren't just in the hardware/software business, they're also an insurance company! After all, that is what the warranty (and especially Applecare) is, insurance.

photocat
Oct 23, 2004, 03:36 PM
Thanks Rod and all the others who can understand me and offer a bit of support. To be honest, I don't really need anyone bashing me, I have done enough self-bashing over the last days.
My main reason for posting was to make people aware of this problem.
If this was a problem for me, and experienced mac user and firm believer of the mac cult, I am sure that more will follow in my path.
Unless they find a thread or a lucky page with information.
It will never happen to me again, because from now on I will be suspicious about voltage. It was a hard lesson to learn.
In the long run, it is only a machine, and it can be fixed. It will be fixed by next week.

I sincerely hope that with this post I have kept at least a few readers from doing the same.

Mechcozmo
Oct 23, 2004, 03:51 PM
My Tungsten T came with 6 different adaptors for use all over the world. They look kinda weird some of them...

I feel bad for you, but anytime you buy something expensive that uses electricity double check to make sure. It can't hurt. I remember this from 8th grade...

Assume
Ass|u|me
When you assume, you make an ass out of you and me.
I hope that you can get your computer fixed...in the US, if you try to use something at 230 volts, it just doesn't work. No frying. There isn't enough voltage to do damage.

toughboy
Oct 23, 2004, 04:13 PM
Thanks Rod and all the others who can understand me and offer a bit of support. To be honest, I don't really need anyone bashing me, I have done enough self-bashing over the last days.
My main reason for posting was to make people aware of this problem.
If this was a problem for me, and experienced mac user and firm believer of the mac cult, I am sure that more will follow in my path.
Unless they find a thread or a lucky page with information.
It will never happen to me again, because from now on I will be suspicious about voltage. It was a hard lesson to learn.
In the long run, it is only a machine, and it can be fixed. It will be fixed by next week.

I sincerely hope that with this post I have kept at least a few readers from doing the same.

Well you warned me at least... Thank you very very much for that.. I was seriously thinking to buy an iMac from United States and use it here in Turkey, where we use 220V like all European countries.. Now I'll be looking for solutions to that, or I'll buy a PC unfortunately, because of the price difference (500-600 euros or something more...)

jdhoyman
Oct 23, 2004, 04:18 PM
just did the same thing to my Emac..... I'm serving in the US Army in Germany... YES, I should have checked the voltage, YES, I'm at fault and am going to pay.... HOWEVER, when many to most computers are dual voltage, a touch more warning would be helpful (with the Emac, the voltage indication is inside the disk drop flap, which you have you pry open with your fingernail).

Also, I've been super frustrated trying to get this fixed... Apple said warranty void, here are some numbers for places in Germany... the vendors here don't know if they can get the parts because it is a US machine....

So if anyone is familiar with power supply problems on Emacs, please provide some advice. Some techs are saying I have to replace my analog and CRT at the tune of $675... please help, I have 50 lbs paper weight.

Doraemon
Oct 24, 2004, 02:33 AM
She's already said her imac G4 was auto-switching. Are you calling her a liar?

I checked it (which I should have done first), stand corrected and apologize. Had a bad day yesterday and guess my reply was pretty unfriendly.

Sorry.

And because I traveled a lot, I always first check if my electronics work with the country's voltage and hence took such precautions for granted.

Please accept my apology.

johnnyjibbs
Oct 24, 2004, 06:04 AM
Photocat, have you managed to get it fixed? I'm pretty sure you could try to claim on the warranty by saying the adaptor was faulty. Lightning is another excuse but I think such "acts of god" are not covered by warranties or insurance. Otherwise, you might be able to claim something on your house insurance. Worth a check.

WinterMute
Oct 24, 2004, 06:17 AM
I checked it (which I should have done first), stand corrected and apologize. Had a bad day yesterday and guess my reply was pretty unfriendly.

Sorry.

And because I traveled a lot, I always first check if my electronics work with the country's voltage and hence took such precautions for granted.

Please accept my apology.

Good man, most people would have shut up, it's nice to see some manners in action.

well done. :D

Frump
Oct 24, 2004, 06:38 AM
[QUOTE=Doraemon]No US desktop Mac EVER has auto switch voltage.
Besides, it's not old technology. It's totally unnecessary to have auto switch voltage on a desktop computer. The number of owners who move to a country with a different voltage is so little, that it's economical nonsense to have such feature on a desktop computer.

Check your facts before you spout them. I have a G5 from America that is dual voltage/auto switching. My european Imac at home is also auto sensing.

One question for the person who had the problem. How did you get Apple to ship to your APO? They won't do it for us. I am in Germany and we had to order from mac warehouse. I checked the Apple return policy page and they state that if you have a problem with your computer out side of the country you purchased it, you just need to call them and they will arrange for it to be repaired.

I feel for you, I would not have expected the problem you had because of my own experience with apple products.

Frump.

Frump
Oct 24, 2004, 07:07 AM
Thanks Rod and all the others who can understand me and offer a bit of support. To be honest, I don't really need anyone bashing me, I have done enough self-bashing over the last days.
My main reason for posting was to make people aware of this problem.
If this was a problem for me, and experienced mac user and firm believer of the mac cult, I am sure that more will follow in my path.
Unless they find a thread or a lucky page with information.
It will never happen to me again, because from now on I will be suspicious about voltage. It was a hard lesson to learn.
In the long run, it is only a machine, and it can be fixed. It will be fixed by next week.

I sincerely hope that with this post I have kept at least a few readers from doing the same.


Thank you for posting the info. I have Two U.S. friends that want to by from the states and use here in Germany. I think I stopped one but the other one might be in for a surprise. Not sure why Apple would change the power supply? We have Two Mac's from the states and did not have to use any thing other than a European power cable. With my experience I am not sure that I would have checked either. An auto switching power source does not have to be any bigger than normal ones. We have compact dell's at work that have very small power source's and they are auto switching.
I hope it all works out for you.

Frump.

stevehaslip
Oct 24, 2004, 07:08 AM
sorry to hear about your bad luck, i wouldn't have thought about it i don't think but then i don't take my computers many places! My G5 doesn't have a power brick, everything must be inside.

To clear things up if i were to take my powerbook to the states, took my power adapter and plugged it in to a universal converter type thing (like you always see in airports) would it be ok? or would it fry it to?

If someone who knows states what you can and can't do then maybe it will prevent this sort of thing from happening to someone again.

toughboy
Oct 24, 2004, 11:21 AM
sorry to hear about your bad luck, i wouldn't have thought about it i don't think but then i don't take my computers many places! My G5 doesn't have a power brick, everything must be inside.

To clear things up if i were to take my powerbook to the states, took my power adapter and plugged it in to a universal converter type thing (like you always see in airports) would it be ok? or would it fry it to?

If someone who knows states what you can and can't do then maybe it will prevent this sort of thing from happening to someone again.

powerbooks, at least mine is, are auto-switch power supplied.. if you go to US and want to use it, you probably have to find a US-type socket-end and change the end of the power brick to plug it in the wall...

Mechcozmo
Oct 24, 2004, 12:29 PM
Idea time!
Someone said earlier that Apple would ship you the correct model (110 or 230 volts) depending on where you ordered it. You ordered it in the States. But you had it shipped to your UK address. This most likely caused the software that Apple uses to send you the 110 volt version.

So, call Apple and say they should have known better to ship you the 110 version because you are in a UK address. It is worth a shot.

jdhoyman
Oct 24, 2004, 01:16 PM
One question for the person who had the problem. How did you get Apple to ship to your APO? They won't do it for us. I am in Germany and we had to order from mac warehouse.

I just recently discovered a website, www.fpoapo.com which has a couple vendors that will ship to germany.... prices are decent.

kbonnel
Oct 24, 2004, 04:25 PM
That really sucks that your Imac is fried (well, hopefully just the PS is bad). I also travel a bunch (currently on international assignment in Sweden), and have to constantly check my equipment. I have a bunch of Radio Shack power converters all over my flat :(

It is strange what items come with a PS that does 100 - 240, and what doesn't. My cheap $10 USB hub has a 100-240 PS, but my $120 electric shaver doesn't (which would probably travel a lot more than a USB hub :) ).

I guess Apple is saying that if you buy an Imac in the states, you can't ever take it with you. Nope, it has to stay. Maybe they are hoping you will buy another Apple for your travels :rolleyes:

Kimo

stevehaslip
Oct 26, 2004, 02:41 PM
cheers for the heads up on the powerbook toughboy.

Chip NoVaMac
Oct 26, 2004, 04:10 PM
it alos bils down to customer service. It is simple to do a followup on any US sale sent to a APO or overseas address to make sure that that they have ordered the right system.

It saves them time and goodwill (in particular to APO addresses).

rueyeet
Oct 26, 2004, 04:44 PM
It will never happen to me again, because from now on I will be suspicious about voltage. It was a hard lesson to learn. I was about to jump on you too, but then I remembered ruining a wool sweater in the wash a couple weeks ago simply because I'd been able to get away with machine-washing other wool sweaters from that store even when they DID have "hand wash only" on the label. So, much less damage done, but no more room to speak.

I guess the lesson amounts to: Never assume, always check and make SURE. :o

joehawrng
Nov 21, 2004, 08:44 PM
Don't feel so bad, I made the same mistake right now. I just wanted to know whether it's fixable or not. Is it only the power supply that is damaged or the whole computer.

Thanks

jared_kipe
Nov 21, 2004, 10:47 PM
Maybe it isn't dead, pull out your transformer and see what happens.

takao
Nov 22, 2004, 05:24 AM
Maybe it isn't dead, pull out your transformer and see what happens.

i second that... maybe just the fuse of the power supply 'run off'

worth a try..


side note i found pretty interesting that apple didn't only use a single power supply for their european/US imacs..that would cut down manufacturing costs for sure (just liek the whole imac design)

JFreak
Nov 22, 2004, 06:28 AM
i do audio work and often buy/rent/borrow gear from america and europe, and yes, the voltage compatibility is the #1 thing to check, but it's annoying. it is the most annoying thing one can think of, and for that reason, the lack of such annoyance immediately makes any gear look better quality compared to others that are fixed voltage.

i'm very close to banning all fixed-voltage gear now, and i'm very surprised apple still does it. APPLE SCREWS YOU AMERICANS, PLEASE COMPLAIN about it as we europeans are now given better apples than you. we get it, you don't, does apple save that much money by screwing its home market?

or does apple think you americans don't travel at all?

i think this is apple's fault, nevertheless the user error that plugged the cord into a "wrong" outlet. however, by today's standards, it's not up to apple to decide what voltage should be used. apple should use universal power supplies everywhere, period.

sgarringer
Nov 22, 2004, 07:47 AM
i do audio work and often buy/rent/borrow gear from america and europe, and yes, the voltage compatibility is the #1 thing to check, but it's annoying. it is the most annoying thing one can think of, and for that reason, the lack of such annoyance immediately makes any gear look better quality compared to others that are fixed voltage.

i'm very close to banning all fixed-voltage gear now, and i'm very surprised apple still does it. APPLE SCREWS YOU AMERICANS, PLEASE COMPLAIN about it as we europeans are now given better apples than you. we get it, you don't, does apple save that much money by screwing its home market?

or does apple think you americans don't travel at all?

i think this is apple's fault, nevertheless the user error that plugged the cord into a "wrong" outlet. however, by today's standards, it's not up to apple to decide what voltage should be used. apple should use universal power supplies everywhere, period.

Um, OK then. Its Apple's fault people dont take the time to check the voltage their computer requires. I know if I had just baught a new sub 2000$ computer through questionable means (buying it from America and shipping it overseas) I'd sure as **** check to see what voltage it requires.

Maybe Apple trusts people too much, thinking they're not going to pull a fast one like that?

devwild
Nov 22, 2004, 12:52 PM
I'm sorry to hear about your accident. I hope you manage some sort of solution. For the person in Turkey, there are power bricks you can buy to convert to 110 volt (just make sure you get one rated well enough for computer use), a friend of mine had to use one in Lithuania for a year. Aside from the size and weight of the toe-stubber, it seemed to work fine.

When I went to visit him this year I am very glad that I took the time to check and double check every one of my devices I took with me to ensure it was auto switching. Luckilly everything I took with me was, including most importantly my dell laptop and ipod. :) Saved me some trouble.

I am also quite glad he warned me to watch out when plugging into non-countersunk sockets, I guess he got zapped once. :eek:

Good luck in finding a solution/replacement.

TMA
Nov 22, 2004, 12:52 PM
We use this guide at work if a customer wants to know if a certain mac model will work abroad, or weather their import will work:

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=75099

wdlove
Nov 22, 2004, 01:21 PM
I'm sorry to hear about your problem. Hope that you will be able to successfully resolve. Will look forward to hear the solution.

Chip NoVaMac
Nov 22, 2004, 01:23 PM
Thanks Rod and all the others who can understand me and offer a bit of support. To be honest, I don't really need anyone bashing me, I have done enough self-bashing over the last days.
My main reason for posting was to make people aware of this problem.
If this was a problem for me, and experienced mac user and firm believer of the mac cult, I am sure that more will follow in my path.
Unless they find a thread or a lucky page with information.
It will never happen to me again, because from now on I will be suspicious about voltage. It was a hard lesson to learn.
In the long run, it is only a machine, and it can be fixed. It will be fixed by next week.

I sincerely hope that with this post I have kept at least a few readers from doing the same.

I feel for you. It is a shame that some were blasting you. I think you have a valid point about the shop you brought it from. I know when I did electronic sales, and APO address was an instant trigger for checking on the voltage of the product.

nfocus design
Nov 22, 2004, 02:02 PM
photocat - Sorry to hear about the iMac. It was an honest mistake, but in your first post you did seem to place the blame on others more than yourself. I mean you are a little bit to blame. The rest of the blame should go to Apple. Not because it wasn't auto-switching, but because they make such cool products. I'm so excited when I get a new Apple product. I want to play with it ASAP. I tend to read the manual only as a last resort. I'd have taken that sucker out of the box and plugged it without a second thought too. What a terrible experience. You must have gone from extremely happy to miserable in a matter of seconds. Good luck. :)

Graeme A
Nov 22, 2004, 07:43 PM
Ow! That has got to hurt! I was looking into getting a 17" iMac G5 from Miami before Christmas to take back to Australia with me but after reading this, I have to re-think those plans.

So, NOW I know why apple charge US$500 more for an iMac from Australia as opposed to the US... It's all to save a couple off cents on the power supplies.

I hope that you get the computer fixed.

andiwm2003
Nov 22, 2004, 08:23 PM
i do audio work and often buy/rent/borrow gear from america and europe, and yes, the voltage compatibility is the #1 thing to check, but it's annoying. it is the most annoying thing one can think of, and for that reason, the lack of such annoyance immediately makes any gear look better quality compared to others that are fixed voltage.

i'm very close to banning all fixed-voltage gear now, and i'm very surprised apple still does it. APPLE SCREWS YOU AMERICANS, PLEASE COMPLAIN about it as we europeans are now given better apples than you. we get it, you don't, does apple save that much money by screwing its home market?

or does apple think you americans don't travel at all?

i think this is apple's fault, nevertheless the user error that plugged the cord into a "wrong" outlet. however, by today's standards, it's not up to apple to decide what voltage should be used. apple should use universal power supplies everywhere, period.

i totally agree. i pay a premium for "ease of use". that should include voltage, meeting all international standards. i'm in the market for a 20"imac. but i don't know how long i will stay in the US. i might go back to europe soon and then i don't want to deal with converters and all that stuff. for $2700 (thats the model i want) i think its fair to expect a $3 autoswitch power supply.

my two cents,

andi

good luck to photocat with the repair.

point665
Nov 22, 2004, 09:32 PM
Sorry to hear about the iMac... I am planning on moving overseas, at least temporarily, next year... I have been checking everything that I buy so it will work... I also am buying air tools instead of electric ones... Small stuff but it will pay off later on.

Chip NoVaMac
Nov 23, 2004, 06:29 AM
or does apple think you americans don't travel at all?

i think this is apple's fault, nevertheless the user error that plugged the cord into a "wrong" outlet. however, by today's standards, it's not up to apple to decide what voltage should be used. apple should use universal power supplies everywhere, period.

IMO Apple sticks the US market with non-switching power supplies to protect their overseas operations.

JFreak
Nov 23, 2004, 06:34 AM
IMO Apple sticks the US market with non-switching power supplies to protect their overseas operations.

well that may be the reason, but it doesn't change the fact that apple sells US customers sub-standard product.

Chip NoVaMac
Nov 23, 2004, 07:14 AM
well that may be the reason, but it doesn't change the fact that apple sells US customers sub-standard product.

Granted. They could do what other manufacturers do, and give different names and warranties for different markets.

davegoody
Nov 23, 2004, 07:58 AM
Sorry to hear of your plight here, but OUCH was the only word I could come up with that was not a profanity !

kenazo
Nov 24, 2004, 01:51 PM
:( :( :(

I just did exactly the same thing and found this thread on Google. I too have an iMac G4, Powebook and iBook which all are American models 110-240V so I didn't even think before plugging in the new iMac G5. Damn.

Can you please let me know what you did to fix it? Which parts need to be replaced? How much did they cost? I'm in the UK also so if you have found a good supplier please let me know.

Thanks....

Chip NoVaMac
Nov 24, 2004, 02:00 PM
:( :( :(

I just did exactly the same thing and found this thread on Google. I too have an iMac G4, Powebook and iBook which all are American models 110-240V so I didn't even think before plugging in the new iMac G5. Damn.

Can you please let me know what you did to fix it? Which parts need to be replaced? How much did they cost? I'm in the UK also so if you have found a good supplier please let me know.

Thanks....

It is starting to seem that Apple should put a sticker over the US based iMac's warning about the voltage.

whooleytoo
Nov 24, 2004, 02:39 PM
It's totally unnecessary to have auto switch voltage on a desktop computer.

Evidently it is necessary - or this thread wouldn't even exist.

Working in Apple in Europe, we used to have lots of hardware shipped to us - often a mixture of US and European. Even if you were careful and checked the voltage 99.5% of the time, that's still probably 2 or 3 devices a year get fried.

maya
Nov 24, 2004, 02:42 PM
I agree with photocat on this issue.

All Apple laptops may it be iBook or PowerBook has auto-switching for the PSU or power adapter unit. Given its a portable.

All Desktop should also have auto-switching for a different reason, what if you reside in the US as a student or for some work related reason or something else buy a Mac desktop and then decide to move to another country. If the desktop has no auto-switching it makes it worthless since you have to sell it and buy a whole new machine. This also goes for external devices.

The iPod has auto-switching adapter and so does AirPort Express, all you have to do is change the prong on the power adapter.

Seems Apple has gotten cheap and quite cheap with the iMac G5. I had one and within a week to 2 weeks max the PSU started to give a "frequency" sound that was just painful to my ears. And it was not the fan(s) noise I can live with that this was quite different.

A damaged PSU most likely however I am not taking that risk again with a rev a, Apple product. Tried to get the PSU replaced would take a week. A week to replace a PSU what age are we living in 1900's. Stock issues whatever :rolleyes:

Put in an Auto-Switching PSU for all your products that was its bought in bulk and the cost is the same if not cheaper for non-auto switching PSU.

Even the SuperDrive on the iMac G5 is SLOWER than the eMac G4, WTF?

iMac G5 = 4x SuperDrive
eMac G4 = 8x SuperDrive
PowerMac G5 = 8x SuperDrive
PowerBook and iBook = 4x SuperDrive

Why is Apple being so cheap in this regard with a new product they toot as being able to work with all the iLife applications.

Once you take away the cost of the 17 or 20 inch lcd it seems they are making a hefty profit on the new iMac G5. Since they buy and re-brand they lcd screens and have been using the 17 and 20 inch for quite some years.

I also have noticed that the iMac G5 frame that surrounds the screen can and has a lot of space to be Thinner.

I believe its a bad move on Apples part to have the PSU in the casing and not as a wall plug as the portable line, it adds more heat to the system and size.

I also hate the ports on the back of the iMac G5 is non-logical, why or why they want to market it as SIMPLE then run one wire and have it "SPLIT" like the Cinema Displays have done it looks like fingers and keeps the nice clean look of the iMac G5 intact.

When the sleep light comes on why have it on the side make the Apple logo light up and also have it as the power button it will look far better.

the iMac G5 rev A is not perfect and it seems a few changes here and there such as:

1. Shrinking the lcd frame to be snug.
2. Have one wire come out of the iMac G5 and have the wire split as the Cinema Displays have.
3. Apple logo should be the power button and also light up. (nothing needed at the back).
4. Use a wall PSU/ Adapter rather than have it housed in the unit and auto-switching for heat and cross country compatibility.
5. With the extra space by removing the PSU unit add more ram slots so it reaches 4-8 gigs in order to use the G5 64-bit system and put it to good use for future proofing.
6. Relocate the speakers please, the bouncing off the wooden table answer is not working for me. Use BT speakers or something, since at present the sound from the speaker sound like the audio is resonating in a hollow box. Or move it to the sides or something, at present its not working with sound reproduction and consider when the fans start to rev up forget it.
7. Where the heck is the MIC housed on the new iMac G5.
8. Cut the weight of the iMac G5, seems the PSU and stand are to blame for this.



Jon. Ive is slipping in his product design. The design is not original of housing all the computer behind the lcd however make a few changes to make it work even better. Love the simplistic look however it needs work, it seems rushed. :rolleyes:

andiwm2003
Nov 24, 2004, 03:08 PM
I agree with photocat on this issue.


1. Shrinking the lcd frame to be snug.
2. Have one wire come out of the iMac G5 and have the wire split as the Cinema Displays have.
3. Apple logo should be the power button and also light up. (nothing needed at the back).
4. Use a wall PSU/ Adapter rather than have it housed in the unit and auto-switching for heat and cross country compatibility.
5. With the extra space by removing the PSU unit add more ram slots so it reaches 4-8 gigs in order to use the G5 64-bit system and put it to good use for future proofing.
6. Relocate the speakers please, the bouncing off the wooden table answer is not working for me. Use BT speakers or something, since at present the sound from the speaker sound like the audio is resonating in a hollow box. Or move it to the sides or something, at present its not working with sound reproduction and consider when the fans start to rev up forget it.
7. Where the heck is the MIC housed on the new iMac G5.
8. Cut the weight of the iMac G5, seems the PSU and stand are to blame for this.



Jon. Ive is slipping in his product design. The design is not original of housing all the computer behind the lcd however make a few changes to make it work even better. Love the simplistic look however it needs work, it seems rushed. :rolleyes:



1.) agree
2.)don't agree. this allows me to quickly connect a card reader or so....
3.)don't care. use cheapest solution.
4.)absolutely agree!!!!!!
5.)don't care (2 gig are enough for me, but i do no video stuff and i plan only for 3 years. so i can see your point)
6.)don't care
7.)see 6.)
8.) agree

you make some good points. but your best point is:"Love the simplistic look however it needs work, it seems rushed." I totally agree here!

my $0.02,

andi

srdashiki
Nov 24, 2004, 03:15 PM
I dont understand any of this gibber jabbin.

Every mac ive owned has a little RED switch right next to the power plug in the back. 110/220 it says.

HMMMMMMM!? Wats that you say? The answer to yer problem? Damn you FRIARS (LOL!) must not look before you leap, or read anything before you do something.

Oh well, another fried mac. Another moron who'll buy another (what apple wants and knows youll do) Mac or who'll go buy a Winblowz.

Im ranting and raving so lets keep going:

Dont expect apple to give a rats ass about any one but themselves. All they care about is reputation, and a fried mac because of some ignorance, isnt going to put a dent in Apples rep for building good machines.

But every good machine, needs a good operator. Most of us take electricity for granted. And we also take our cars for granted.

Most people buy a computer and dont think twice about how it works, or will work. Same thing with cars, 90% of people buy a car and dont know shiiiit about how to change a tire, oil, brakes etc etc. And besides a home, a car is the biggest investment we all make, and we dont even care if we can fix it or know how it works.

And yet we buy computers and do the same thing? Anyone who fries their computer deserves to lose that $2000. Moron, you spent $2000 and just BAM plugged it into an "alien" socket you knew better than to, and you did it anyway. You werent a newbie to the UK, nor a Mac or coimputer noobie. BUt like the car folks, you bought it and expected it to work no matter what. MORONS!

takao
Nov 24, 2004, 03:22 PM
I dont understand any of this gibber jabbin.

Every mac ive owned has a little RED switch right next to the power plug in the back. 110/220 it says.


looks like the imac g5 does not ...at least i havn't spotted one on the picture

persoanlly i haven't come aroudn a pc who doesn't have a switch or auto sensing...

MattG
Nov 24, 2004, 03:22 PM
Even the SuperDrive on the iMac G5 is SLOWER than the eMac G4, WTF?

iMac G5 = 4x SuperDrive
eMac G4 = 8x SuperDrive
PowerMac G5 = 8x SuperDrive
PowerBook and iBook = 4x SuperDrive

Why is Apple being so cheap in this regard with a new product they toot as being able to work with all the iLife applications.

The 4x SuperDrive doesn't have anything to do with Apple being cheap...the iMacs use the smaller form factor optical drives (like the Powerbooks/iBooks use), and AFAIK, those are not available in 8x yet. If the iMac G5 could fit a full sized drive (like a regular G5 desktop), I'm sure they'd have the 8x drives.

Rod Rod
Nov 24, 2004, 03:24 PM
I dont understand any of this gibber jabbin.

Every mac ive owned has a little RED switch right next to the power plug in the back. 110/220 it says.

HMMMMMMM!? Wats that you say? The answer to yer problem? Damn you FRIARS (LOL!) must not look before you leap, or read anything before you do something.

Oh well, another fried mac. Another moron who'll buy another (what apple wants and knows youll do) Mac or who'll go buy a Winblowz.

Im ranting and raving so lets keep going:

Dont expect apple to give a rats ass about any one but themselves. All they care about is reputation, and a fried mac because of some ignorance, isnt going to put a dent in Apples rep for building good machines.

But every good machine, needs a good operator. Most of us take electricity for granted. And we also take our cars for granted.

Most people buy a computer and dont think twice about how it works, or will work. Same thing with cars, 90% of people buy a car and dont know shiiiit about how to change a tire, oil, brakes etc etc. And besides a home, a car is the biggest investment we all make, and we dont even care if we can fix it or know how it works.

And yet we buy computers and do the same thing? Anyone who fries their computer deserves to lose that $2000. Moron, you spent $2000 and just BAM plugged it into an "alien" socket you knew better than to, and you did it anyway. You werent a newbie to the UK, nor a Mac or coimputer noobie. BUt like the car folks, you bought it and expected it to work no matter what. MORONS!

this has my vote for the nutso post of the day. you say there's a red switch on every mac you've owned, and yet your sig states you own a dual 1.8GHz G5. credibility? zero.

maya
Nov 24, 2004, 03:35 PM
The 4x SuperDrive doesn't have anything to do with Apple being cheap...the iMacs use the smaller form factor optical drives (like the Powerbooks/iBooks use), and AFAIK, those are not available in 8x yet. If the iMac G5 could fit a full sized drive (like a regular G5 desktop), I'm sure they'd have the 8x drives.

If you are certain that the iMac G5 indeed uses a portable sized DVD burner than I stand corrected. :)

kenazo
Nov 24, 2004, 04:10 PM
I dont understand any of this gibber jabbin.

Every mac ive owned has a little RED switch right next to the power plug in the back. 110/220 it says.

[SNIP]

MORONS!

Maybe you missed some of this thread. The new iMac G5 when bought in the US or Japan does not have a manual switch 110/240 nor an autoswitch 110/240. As I said my iMac G4, PB G4, iBook G3 all have autoswitching 110/240 and foolishly I didn't check the new G5. Even my iSub has 110/240 :(

kenazo
Nov 26, 2004, 12:56 PM
For anyone interested I searched around Sheffield yesterday for someone willing to take a look at the psu and repair it. I finally found a guy who would take a shot at it and he successfully repaired it the same day. It cost me £40.

His name is Pete Harteley in Sheffield, 238 London Road. The shop is called Harteley Electronics or something like that. His number is 07890744230.

jadam
Nov 26, 2004, 07:45 PM
Why didnt you just buy it in the UK to begin with?

You have no reason to complain considering you bought a US product designed to work in the US and used it in europe without using a converter. Also trying to use the fact that certain previous apple products have autoswitching won't help you. Like I said before, it is a US product designed to work ONLY in the US, if you use it anywhere else you have to make sure Apple says it will work or else its your own fault if anything breaks.

Rod Rod
Nov 26, 2004, 08:39 PM
Why didnt you just buy it in the UK to begin with?

You have no reason to complain considering you bought a US product designed to work in the US and used it in europe without using a converter. Also trying to use the fact that certain previous apple products have autoswitching won't help you. Like I said before, it is a US product designed to work ONLY in the US, if you use it anywhere else you have to make sure Apple says it will work or else its your own fault if anything breaks.

The above sentiment should have been dispensed with in the first page of this thread. But as I said before (and you would know if you would read the thread - and if you can't be bothered to read the whole thread before responding then don't bother responding at all), this is a bad attitude to take. There is no need for the above quoted comment. Obviously the people who have gone through this travail have already suffered plenty without your nonsense. The reason the original poster shared her experience was to warn others. Now more of us know to not expect consistency in Apple products when it comes to auto switching power supplies.

cawiddis
Nov 26, 2004, 09:12 PM
I run a data center here in the Philippines (220v) where we've installed over 1500+ HP desktops in the last 12months. The last few batches have all had a red sticker covering the power input on the PC "Check Power Voltage". Simple... couldn't cost more than 5c a unit.

In today's "globalised" market, where PC's are shipped all over the world - you would think the companies could take a more globalised approach.

As to why they don't include an autosensing PSU... who knows? These HP units are not auto-sensing, but are voltage selectable (via the trusty old red switch). I think the answer might be in one of the very first posts... about heat transfer when stepping down 220v to 110v??

My last 2c... I see this all the time with Americans coming OS... people blowing up Cell Phone chargers, Hair Dryers etc. I'm and Aussie and used to 240v... we never fry our stuff - the worst we can do is not get enough juice. But having said all that, I am victim of frying a $5000 Router that was shipped from our office in the USA. I was so used to working with locally supplied products, I just forgot to check.

As they say, if all else fails... read the manual!

Chuckles
__________________
I'm not laughing at you - thats my name!

andiwm2003
Nov 27, 2004, 08:53 PM
I run a data center here in the Philippines (220v) where we've installed over 1500+ HP desktops in the last 12months.

1500+?!!!! I hope that gets you a HP iPOD for free!

andi

mixmastermateo
Dec 1, 2004, 02:49 PM
Well, it's true and bad news for thoese customers who move around a lot. I have owned 7 apples and all of them were auto or manual switching. I was totally psyched to buy the new g5, and now I will not. The auto switching is crucial for me as I live abroad frequently. If you look on this link http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=75099 you will see out of 26 models, only 2 are not. Why the change on a super product? I can still pay a fortune and get a dual G5, auto switching. I hope a rev b will change this.

M

pianojoe
Dec 1, 2004, 04:52 PM
Same thing almost happened to me when I set up a HK receiver I ordered in the states for my sister to use over here in Germany. I glanced over the spec plate by mere accident.

These machines are not auto-switch, and now she needs a transformator to operate it. But, with high-end audio gear, a trafo is a good thing to have anyway because it cancels out strange things your electricity gets contaminated with on the way.

Anyway, bad luck for the original poster, but, hey, if you order in the States, you'll get a device that is operational in the States. And U.S. forces facilities in Germany usually have 110V/60Hz and U.S. sockets. I know a couple of U.S. army people who live outside the barracks, and they all have transformators to operate their gear.

StarbucksSam
Dec 1, 2004, 05:30 PM
Those of you who are being mean, that's not cool. It was a simple mistake, and while we can argue over which of the involved parties is to blame, that is an exercise in futility, and kindness is probably a better option.

Ma'am, I'm really sorry you had this unfortunate experience, and I wish I could help you in some way, but there is obviously nothing I can do. I wish you best of luck in resolving your problem, and remember: don't kick yourself too much. We all make mistakes. ALL OF US.

jxyama
Dec 1, 2004, 06:06 PM
Not all americans live in America, and the whole world does not live on 110 volt.

i don't think apple is to blame for assuming that the american models be used in america. if companies cannot make such an assumption, does she realize that she's asking every company making any sort of electronics devices to label/design all of their products for the remote possibility any of them ever goes overseas?

if she said, this is what happened and i'm just venting, then people would have been more sympathetic. trying to shift this much blame is in pretty poor taste.

anyway, yeah, iMac should still be dual voltage. and you should definitely complain. but there are reasons some posters haven't been too sympathetic. while it's not to same degree, how would people react to people who drops their iBook, breaks it and blames apple for not making it "durable enough"?

Rod Rod
Dec 2, 2004, 07:42 AM
i don't think apple is to blame for assuming that the american models be used in america. if companies cannot make such an assumption, does she realize that she's asking every company making any sort of electronics devices to label/design all of their products for the remote possibility any of them ever goes overseas?

if she said, this is what happened and i'm just venting, then people would have been more sympathetic. trying to shift this much blame is in pretty poor taste.

anyway, yeah, iMac should still be dual voltage. and you should definitely complain. but there are reasons some posters haven't been too sympathetic. while it's not to same degree, how would people react to people who drops their iBook, breaks it and blames apple for not making it "durable enough"?

That's the best example of doublespeak I've seen / read / heard in a while. :) Have your cake and eat it too.

jxyama
Dec 2, 2004, 12:50 PM
That's the best example of doublespeak I've seen / read / heard in a while. :) Have your cake and eat it too.

well, i meant complain to apple. :p

in the first part, i was just trying to give reasons why some people haven't been sympathetic. the second part, i kinda gave my own opinion. :)

Rod Rod
Dec 2, 2004, 04:25 PM
well, i meant complain to apple. :p

in the first part, i was just trying to give reasons why some people haven't been sympathetic. the second part, i kinda gave my own opinion. :)

Now that you said that, it makes sense. It's odd how the rest of the world gets switching power supplies but the U.S. and Japan gets 110V/60Hz only.

Chip NoVaMac
Dec 2, 2004, 04:37 PM
Now that you said that, it makes sense. It's odd how the rest of the world gets switching power supplies but the U.S. and Japan gets 110V/60Hz only.

It's called protecting your distribution network. I am not sure how the overseas units are setup. Many other companies require overseas units to purchase from the parent company, and provide the costs for warranty repairs.

In the US the iMac G5 starts at 1299USD. In the Uk that would work out to be about 675GBP; a savings of 108GBP. These numbers do not include VAT for the UK. So there could a great advantage to import from the US to the UK (not sure how taxes and such would eat into the bottom line).

Rod Rod
Dec 2, 2004, 04:44 PM
Chip NoVaMac, that may be what it's called, however the taxes (as you mentioned) more than make up for the difference. The only way around the taxes is people being dishonest in marking items as gifts (eBay sales) or the typical tourist buying a laptop over here and claiming upon their return that it was with them when they left their home country. Otherwise, all legitimate retailers will either not sell outside the U.S. or if they do, they'll mark the customs forms appropriately. By the way, my policy for international eBay sales is that I will always declare the full bid value on the customs form and I'll never mark it as a gift. That has blocked some potential sales and profits but I'd rather not play the game of defrauding governments.

jwolf
Dec 4, 2004, 08:15 AM
We too have many desktop Macs in APO AE. For years they have been auto voltage switching, up through a G4 swivel arm. Thanks for saving the G5 that arrived yesterday for my son.

PS: Beware of the "Worldwide Warranty" included with the G4 and G5. Apple says that the world isn't always wide for desktop repairs.

YoYoMac
Dec 25, 2004, 05:27 AM
Chip NoVaMac, that may be what it's called, however the taxes (as you mentioned) more than make up for the difference. The only way around the taxes is people being dishonest in marking items as gifts (eBay sales) or the typical tourist buying a laptop over here and claiming upon their return that it was with them when they left their home country. Otherwise, all legitimate retailers will either not sell outside the U.S. or if they do, they'll mark the customs forms appropriately. By the way, my policy for international eBay sales is that I will always declare the full bid value on the customs form and I'll never mark it as a gift. That has blocked some potential sales and profits but I'd rather not play the game of defrauding governments.

Okay, this entire post is very relevant to me right now. For two reasons.

1. My father is buying me an iMac for Christmas. Surprisingly, I was going to buy one myself, but he is going to for me. I live in China. I have looked everywhere on the internet for taxes or customs or VAT that would be charged on an iMac/Desktop/screen whatever you want to call it. Rod Rod, you said that people mark it as a gift and it doesn't get charged that? Please let me know becuase it really is a gift, and I wouldn't want to be charged some kind of tax if I didn't need to be.

2. I live in China ~ 240 volt. iMac coming from America. Is there any way to buy a powersupply from Apple? If so, how much would it cost. Anyone know? I read that she got her's replaced for 40 pounds or something? If anyone could help me that'd be great.

Rod Rod
Dec 27, 2004, 07:31 AM
Okay, this entire post is very relevant to me right now. For two reasons.

1. My father is buying me an iMac for Christmas. Surprisingly, I was going to buy one myself, but he is going to for me. I live in China. I have looked everywhere on the internet for taxes or customs or VAT that would be charged on an iMac/Desktop/screen whatever you want to call it. Rod Rod, you said that people mark it as a gift and it doesn't get charged that? Please let me know becuase it really is a gift, and I wouldn't want to be charged some kind of tax if I didn't need to be.

2. I live in China ~ 240 volt. iMac coming from America. Is there any way to buy a powersupply from Apple? If so, how much would it cost. Anyone know? I read that she got her's replaced for 40 pounds or something? If anyone could help me that'd be great.

Hi YoYoMac,

You might want to ask someone at your nearby U.S. consulate or embassy about the customs duties / gift question. They should be reachable via email. Here's the embassy in Beijing (http://beijing.usembassy.gov/). That page has links to the consulates (Chengdu, Guangzhou, Shanghai and Shenyang).

I don't know how easy or difficult it would be to buy the auto-switching power supply from Apple. Hopefully it won't be impossible. The key thing is that you still have your U.S. warranty intact with the 110/220 power supply, and for that your dad will probably have to get the local Apple store or Apple authorized service center to perform the operation.

I hope this helps!

G5orbust
Dec 28, 2004, 08:52 AM
Im using my 12 inch, rev. A powerbook G4 in Japan right now with no problems. Since Japan and the US use the same plugs but different voltages, it was easy, though I bought the international travel kit from Apple (sucks for the extra purchase, but thats probably what killed your computer) just to be sure. It is really unfortunate that such a simple thing as plugging in a device can do hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars in damage to it.

Dont worry about the caustic speech of the self proclaimed "übergeeks", because theres no doubt in my mind that theyve made even more simple mistakes in their lives, as we all have. So please, guys and gals, dont use such harsh tones next time. It only leads to trouble.

Macky-Mac
Dec 28, 2004, 02:37 PM
Okay, this entire post is very relevant to me right now. For two reasons.

1. My father is buying me an iMac for Christmas. Surprisingly, I was going to buy one myself, but he is going to for me. I live in China. I have looked everywhere on the internet for taxes or customs or VAT that would be charged on an iMac/Desktop/screen whatever you want to call it. Rod Rod, you said that people mark it as a gift and it doesn't get charged that? Please let me know becuase it really is a gift, and I wouldn't want to be charged some kind of tax if I didn't need to be.




each country has it's own rules but most countries limit the value of tax free "gifts".....and it's typically going to be more in the range $50 and not something expensive like an iMac. "Gifts" (even real gifts) over the value limit typically are charged import duty. You would have to check with the Chinese government to find what the rules are for China.

You say you live in China but you don't say if you are a Chinese citizen or if you are from another country....in most countries a temporary foreign resident is allowed to bring personal possessions, like a computer, with them without paying an import duty...as long as those possessions are not for resale and are taken out of the country when the temporary resident leaves the country.....would that apply to you? Again, you would have to check with the Chinese government to find out the details of Chinese regulations

sjpetry
Dec 28, 2004, 04:10 PM
It's an understandable thing to do, but I think it is also understandable that Apple uses non-auto-switching power supplies for the U.S. iMac.

The iMac is rather big and is not something people will bring with them on pleasure travels abroad, the iBook on the other hand is something that people will bring with them. That's why the iBook has an auto-switching power supply and not the iMac.

I agree, but I also think it is not her fault.

cawiddis
Jan 20, 2005, 11:09 AM
Airport Express has an Auto-Sensing power supply. Take it to USA (110V), Europe (220V), Philippines (110 or 220V), Australia (240V) no problem at all.

And its total size is about the same as 2 decks of cards... granted its power throughput isn't as much as a G5...