Go Back   MacRumors Forums > Mac Community > Community Discussion > Current Events

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old Jul 3, 2012, 04:18 PM   #1
MorphingDragon
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: The World Inbetween
Send a message via Skype™ to MorphingDragon
All Dinosaurs may have had feathers.

http://www.sciencenews.org/view/gene...e_had_feathers

Quote:
Early dinosaurs probably looked a lot more like Big Bird than scientists once suspected. A newly discovered, nearly complete fossilized skeleton hints that all dinosaurs may have sported feathers.

“It suggests that the ancestor of all dinosaurs might have been a feathered animal,” says study author Mark Norell, a paleontologist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Researchers have found feathered dinosaurs before, but this one is more distantly related to birds than any previously discovered. Called Sciurumimus albersdoerferi, it belongs to a group of massive dinosaurs called megalosaurs that had sharp teeth, claws and a heavy-duty frame. The specimen — a youngster that lived about 150 million years ago — is only 70 centimeters long, but it could have grown up to 10 meters, about the length of a school bus.

The fossil’s feathers aren’t the only things getting paleontologists all aflutter. The skeleton’s condition is exciting, too.

“It’s a gorgeous specimen,” says Luis Chiappe, a paleontologist at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. “Probably one of the best meat-eating dinosaurs ever preserved.”

The skeleton rests in a bed of limestone, back arched, mouth gaping, tail curled behind its head. Its bones are unbroken and still carry remnants of flesh, scientists report online July 2 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “There aren’t many more things you can ask of a fossil,” Chiappe says.

Bits of smooth, scaleless skin anchor long, fine feathers to the tail. Unlike modern feathers, these “protofeathers” or “type 1 feathers” look like simple strands of hair. The thin, flexible feathers are ancient versions of the broad, branching plumage —“type 2 feathers” — that adorn modern birds. Though the feathers look different, both are made from the same basic ingredients.

In life, the hairlike feathers would have given the dinosaur a thick coat and a bushy tail. (Part of the dinosaur’s name, Sciurumimus, derives from the Greek for “squirrel mimic.”) “It looks like it was a pretty fluffy kind of thing,” Norell says. “Kind of like a baby chick.”

Eventually, the study’s authors hope to figure out the color of the dinosaur’s feathers. But because color tests require fossil snippets, scientists would have to clip bits from the dinosaur’s remains. And since this specimen is one of a kind, researchers aren’t quite ready to disturb it.

So far, nearly all of the feathered dinosaurs ever discovered have come from eastern Asia. But excavators unearthed this fossil in southern Germany. Even in places collectors picked over for 150 years, Norell says, new things keep turning up. “There’s always more out there,” he says.
MorphingDragon is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 3, 2012, 05:35 PM   #2
Fazzy
macrumors 6502
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: check the tracking device
All of a sudden, the dance moves that go with the song "everybody walk the dinosaur" take on a whole new meaning.
__________________
PICK ME PICK ME PICK ME PICK MEPICK MEPICK ME PICK ME
Fazzy is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 4, 2012, 07:12 AM   #3
jeremy h
macrumors 6502
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: UK
I think there's a lot more to be found out about this... I've never really understood how dinosaurs went extinct everywhere (regardless of size) and other creatures survived. Now, I know it's contentious but the idea that birds are little dinosaurs has a certain logic?
jeremy h is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 4, 2012, 07:19 AM   #4
lannisters4life
macrumors 6502
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Sydney
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremy h View Post
I think there's a lot more to be found out about this... I've never really understood how dinosaurs went extinct everywhere (regardless of size) and other creatures survived. Now, I know it's contentious but the idea that birds are little dinosaurs has a certain logic?
They're definitely mini dinos. All you need to do is look at them.
lannisters4life is offline   1 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 4, 2012, 09:12 AM   #5
jeremy h
macrumors 6502
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: UK
Quote:
Originally Posted by lannisters4life View Post
They're definitely mini dinos. All you need to do is look at them.
I agree. I've got quite a few fossils - one of them is a very small reptile (Triassic), and if you saw the original bones lying on the ground you'd swear it was a bird.
jeremy h is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 4, 2012, 09:13 AM   #6
notjustjay
macrumors 603
 
notjustjay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Canada, eh?
I was watching the Jurassic Park movies again recently and remember reading on IMDB that they changed the design of the raptors between the second and third movies to reflect new research that suggested they had feathers.
__________________
.
notjustjay is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 4, 2012, 10:12 AM   #7
Mousse
macrumors 65816
 
Mousse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: The Mended Drum, Ankh-Morpork
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremy h View Post
I think there's a lot more to be found out about this... I've never really understood how dinosaurs went extinct everywhere (regardless of size) and other creatures survived. Now, I know it's contentious but the idea that birds are little dinosaurs has a certain logic?
I've been of the opinion that birds were descended from dinosaurs for decades (back when I first saw the famous fossil of the Archaeopteryx). Big dinos dying out makes sense, since their energy requirement would have been enormous. Smaller dinos (those I believed evolved in to birds) should have been able to scrap enough resources together to survive.
A catastrophic event that wiped out the ALL the dinosaurs, but left mammals and insects alive? Makes no sense to me. The only way I can see that being true if someone targeted the dinosaurs for extinction and hunted them down to the smallest specimen after hurtling a meteor at the Earth.
__________________
D'oh! (_8(|)
Mousse is offline   1 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 4, 2012, 11:42 AM   #8
jeremy h
macrumors 6502
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: UK
Did anyone here read 2000AD as a kid? (Don't know if it sold anywhere other than here in the UK?) There was a great strip in which hunters from the future went back to hunt and farm dinosaurs for meat... That extinction explanation made more sense to me as a 12 year old than ideas of mammals eating their eggs that was doing the rounds in the 70's.

If they had feathers they probably tasted like turkey in my book...
jeremy h is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 4, 2012, 12:49 PM   #9
chrono1081
macrumors 604
 
chrono1081's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Isla Nublar
I remember hearing this around 1995 shortly after Jurassic Park came out (in 1993) and it made me sad so I like to pretend all dinosaurs look the way they do in Jurassic Park :P
__________________
Mac Pro (2010): 3.33Ghz Intel Xeon (6 core) - 24 GB RAM - NVidia Quadro k5000
Macbook Air (2010): 2.13 Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo - 4GB RAM
chrono1081 is offline   2 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 5, 2012, 09:00 AM   #10
whooleytoo
macrumors 603
 
whooleytoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Cork, Ireland.
Send a message via AIM to whooleytoo
Somehow, a big fluffy Tyrannosaurus Rex just doesn't have the same 'bite' does it?

(And yes, I did have to look up how to spell it).
__________________
Mac <- Macintosh <- McIntosh apples <- John McIntosh <- McIntosh surname <- "Mac an toshach" <- "Son of the Chief"
whooleytoo is online now   4 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 6, 2012, 11:00 AM   #11
Tomorrow
macrumors 603
 
Tomorrow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Always a day away
This makes no sense. When I play Carnivores, they don't have feathers.
__________________
I would scream just to be heard, as if yelling at the stars - I was bleeding just to feel.
You would never say a word, kept me reaching in the dark - always something to conceal.
Tomorrow is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 6, 2012, 12:09 PM   #12
Jaffa Cake
macrumors Core
 
Jaffa Cake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: The City of Culture, Englandshire
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremy h View Post
Did anyone here read 2000AD as a kid? (Don't know if it sold anywhere other than here in the UK?) There was a great strip in which hunters from the future went back to hunt and farm dinosaurs for meat...
I remember that – the strip in question was called Flesh.
__________________
How may I live without my name? I have given you my soul, leave me my name!
Jaffa Cake is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 6, 2012, 12:17 PM   #13
Scepticalscribe
Contributor
 
Scepticalscribe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kite flying
Quote:
Originally Posted by MorphingDragon View Post
Great idea for a thread, and thanks for posting this fascinating piece of information.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremy h View Post
I agree. I've got quite a few fossils - one of them is a very small reptile (Triassic), and if you saw the original bones lying on the ground you'd swear it was a bird.
Yes, that theory has been around for a while and it seems to make a lot of sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremy h View Post
Did anyone here read 2000AD as a kid? (Don't know if it sold anywhere other than here in the UK?) There was a great strip in which hunters from the future went back to hunt and farm dinosaurs for meat... That extinction explanation made more sense to me as a 12 year old than ideas of mammals eating their eggs that was doing the rounds in the 70's.
Yes, I remember 2000AD - a great comic book. Used to read it regularly......even when my kid brother used to buy it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by whooleytoo View Post
Somehow, a big fluffy Tyrannosaurus Rex just doesn't have the same 'bite' does it?

(And yes, I did have to look up how to spell it).
Lol - I hear you, and must admit that you have a point.
Scepticalscribe is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 6, 2012, 02:27 PM   #14
voyagerd
macrumors 65816
 
voyagerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Folsom, CA
Send a message via AIM to voyagerd Send a message via MSN to voyagerd Send a message via Yahoo to voyagerd Send a message via Skype™ to voyagerd
Yay! Feathers!
__________________
15" MacBook Pro / 2.6GHz C2D / 4GB / 750GB SSHD / 8600M GT
SR-2 Hackintosh / Dual Intel® Xeon® X5680@4.3GHz / 48GB RAM / 2x 480GB Intel SSDs / GeForce GTX 780
64GB iPhone 5S, 120GB iPod Classic
voyagerd is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 6, 2012, 02:46 PM   #15
Jaffa Cake
macrumors Core
 
Jaffa Cake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: The City of Culture, Englandshire
Quote:
Originally Posted by whooleytoo View Post
Somehow, a big fluffy Tyrannosaurus Rex just doesn't have the same 'bite' does it?
Perhaps not, but if one was chasing you I'm sure you wouldn't be thinking how fluffy it looked.
__________________
How may I live without my name? I have given you my soul, leave me my name!
Jaffa Cake is offline   2 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 7, 2012, 05:38 AM   #16
Abstract
macrumors Penryn
 
Abstract's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Location Location
Quote:
Originally Posted by voyagerd View Post
Yay! Feathers!
Yay! Strip!
__________________
"Hard? It's supposed to be hard. Hard is what makes it great!" - Tom Hanks.
Abstract is offline   1 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2012, 09:39 AM   #17
AhmedFaisal
Guest
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MorphingDragon View Post
Sorry but this is a bit incorrect. It adds to the thought that all the Theropods, a subclass of dinosaurs from which birds ultimately evolved, had feathers, it doesn't prove that all dinosaurs, i.e. also the other big subgroup of dinosaurs the Ornithischia (Ankylosaurus, Triceratops, Stegosaurus) had feathers. In fact it doesn't even prove that all Saurischia to which the Theropods belong had feathers, the Sauropodomorpha (Diplodocus, Bronto/Apatosaurus) the other big subgroup of Saurischia, at this point is not thought to have had feathers but an Iguana like skin appearance.
  0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2012, 04:31 PM   #18
MorphingDragon
Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: The World Inbetween
Send a message via Skype™ to MorphingDragon
Quote:
Originally Posted by AhmedFaisal View Post
Sorry but this is a bit incorrect. It adds to the thought that all the Theropods, a subclass of dinosaurs from which birds ultimately evolved, had feathers, it doesn't prove that all dinosaurs, i.e. also the other big subgroup of dinosaurs the Ornithischia (Ankylosaurus, Triceratops, Stegosaurus) had feathers. In fact it doesn't even prove that all Saurischia to which the Theropods belong had feathers, the Sauropodomorpha (Diplodocus, Bronto/Apatosaurus) the other big subgroup of Saurischia, at this point is not thought to have had feathers but an Iguana like skin appearance.
Well then tell News Science, I'm not a paleontologist or a biologist.

Last edited by MorphingDragon; Jul 9, 2012 at 04:36 PM.
MorphingDragon is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2012, 04:35 PM   #19
AhmedFaisal
Guest
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MorphingDragon View Post
Well then tell News Science, I'm not a paleontologist.
Someone already did in the comments section. Otherwise I would have. Half educated journalists, as usual......
  0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 12, 2012, 07:24 PM   #20
APlotdevice
macrumors 68020
 
APlotdevice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremy h View Post
I think there's a lot more to be found out about this... I've never really understood how dinosaurs went extinct everywhere (regardless of size) and other creatures survived. Now, I know it's contentious but the idea that birds are little dinosaurs has a certain logic?
Or not so little dinosaurs in some cases....
__________________
There is something deeply wrong with a society more offended by breasts than by entrails.
Pebble SmartWatch | iPhone 5c | 11" Macbook Air '13 | HTPC | TV | Numerous Old Consoles
APlotdevice is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 13, 2012, 12:00 PM   #21
Sackvillenb
macrumors 6502a
 
Sackvillenb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Canada! \m/
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremy h View Post
I've never really understood how dinosaurs went extinct everywhere (regardless of size) and other creatures survived.
Well, that's the thing. They didn't go extinct everywhere regardless of size. The smaller bird-like dinosaurs DID survive... and evolved into birds! And if that seems a bit oddly specific, it's partly due to their size and some other adaptations, but also do to their majorly useful adaptation for flight. The only dinosaurs that survived were the ones that became birds.
__________________
37" Palladium iMac, 7.7 GHz 14-core i9, 256 Gb Ram, 666 TB HD, 4.5" Macbook Pro mini, 16 Gb iPad, 12 Amp Dust Devil vacuum, 84 inch steel frame bed, 473 inch house.
Sackvillenb is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 14, 2012, 10:26 AM   #22
Hastings101
macrumors 68000
 
Hastings101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: blargh
Quote:
Originally Posted by APlotdevice View Post
Or not so little dinosaurs in some cases....
Image
That would be scary in reality but in picture form it's just so funny. Like having an enormous chicken hunt you down lol.
__________________
Please use
continuous
text
Hastings101 is offline   1 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 14, 2012, 10:36 AM   #23
iJohnHenry
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: On tenterhooks
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hastings101 View Post
That would be scary in reality but in picture form it's just so funny. Like having an enormous chicken hunt you down lol.
We were smarter then.

Well, at least the ones that survived to reproduce.

What happened to that laudable system, anyway??
iJohnHenry is offline   1 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 14, 2012, 04:01 PM   #24
The-Pro
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Germany
Very interesting thanks for posting that
__________________
2012 15" 2.6 i7 AG MBP, 2009 17" AG MBP, 2009 8C 2.26 MP, 2010 4c MP,2010+07 MM, 17" 2007 MBP,20" iMac G5,17" PB G4,4x30"CD,2x23" CD, G3's,G4's, 17"iMac g4,iMac G3 turquoise,macintoshes dating to 1985
The-Pro is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jul 24, 2012, 09:16 AM   #25
impulse462
macrumors 65816
 
impulse462's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: SF Bay Area
It's pretty interesting.

If you look at the fossil/structure of the foot of a T-rex and compare it to modern day birds, they are eerily similar as well.

My biology prof in college thought he was the reincarnation of Charles Darwin, and he hammered the fact that birds and dinosaurs probably shared a common ancestor that neither of them shared with crocodiles, which is probably why birds and dinosaurs are similar, structure wise. I havent read any data relating to the DNA or proteins comparing dinosaurs or birds, but they probably have some similarities as well.

It probably took thousands of different species to get differentiation between the two, but the fact they share some key similarities is what makes it so interesting in my opinion.
__________________
13.3" MacBook Air, 1.3GHz Core i5, 4GB RAM, 128GB SSD; 16GB Space Gray iPhone 6
impulse462 is online now   0 Reply With Quote


Reply
MacRumors Forums > Mac Community > Community Discussion > Current Events

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Similar Threads
thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Go Home Dinosaurs for Ipad 9dkid iPad Apps 0 May 9, 2013 03:39 PM

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:41 AM.

Mac Rumors | Mac | iPhone | iPhone Game Reviews | iPhone Apps

Mobile Version | Fixed | Fluid | Fluid HD
Copyright 2002-2013, MacRumors.com, LLC