ADC vs DVI connections

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by cballrthal, Aug 8, 2003.

  1. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2003
    Location:
    Buffalo, NY
    #1
    Why does Apple ship the flat screens with ADC and the PowerBooks with DVI?

    The previous line of flat screens had DVI.
    Does anybody know where I can buy one of these? Probably cheaper at this point and I wouldn't have to buy an adapter.

    Is there a big quality difference between ADC and DVI?
     
  2. Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #2
    In terms of video quality there is no difference: ADC=DVI+USB+Power.
     
  3. macrumors 68040

    jxyama

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2003
    #3
    Re: ADC vs DVI connections

    i think in the slim profile of powerbooks, there's no space to consolidate the DVI/USB/Power Supply into one ADC... hence DVI only...
     
  4. macrumors 68020

    Raid

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2003
    Location:
    Toronto
    #4
    Ok, so this is a little off topic

    Sorry for getting a little OT, but I'm having a bit of a problem with my ADC 17" CRT Monitor that maybe somebody here can help with.

    I've got a new desk with a CPU drawer and the way it works out (and unfortunately I can't rearrange things) is my monitor cable is about 3 feet short of connecting to the CPU inside the drawer. So I called my local mac store and they hooked me up with a 10 foot extention cable (way more than I needed) from Dr. Bott. But after several attempts to get my monitor working I found out that these cables only work for LCD screens because the power demands of the LCD are much less than my clunky old CRT monitor. I've looked everywhere for a cable that would work with my CRT monitor and came up with squat; I even suggested an ADC -> DVI cable then hooking that up to DVI -> ADC converter to get the extra length I needed, but the store didn't think that would work.

    Is there anybody out there who knows how to extend the ADC connection on the CRT's? :confused: I'd appreciate the help!

    Raid
     
  5. macrumors demi-god

    szark

    Joined:
    May 14, 2002
    Location:
    Arid-Zone-A
    #5
    Re: Re: ADC vs DVI connections

    Plus it would be difficult to power the monitor using the battery... ;)

    Seriously, the DVI is a growing standard, so the PB can easily be plugged in to third-party projectors for presentations, and other similar uses.
     
  6. macrumors 68000

    ZildjianKX

    Joined:
    May 18, 2003
    #6
    Re: Re: Re: ADC vs DVI connections

    You hit the nail on the head... it would be freak'n stupid to power a 23" studio display with a powerbook. I really hate the Apple ADC standard... I really don't think it supports USB 2.0 either, way to go Apple. The DVI to ADC converter fell in price $50 to $99, so maybe Apple is discounting it to get rid of it...

    http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APP...faNQj2szcXyayrAzSLQl/1.5.0.5.14.0.5.2.1?53,14
     
  7. macrumors 68000

    Daveman Deluxe

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2003
    Location:
    Corvallis, Oregon
    #7
    I think a better idea as far as monitor solutions go is for all monitor ports on the PowerBook, iBook, and Power Mac to be DVI. Desktop machines can come with another port on the back for plugging the Apple display's power/USB into. The monitor will have separate ports for power/USB and monitor signal. That way, you can just plug it into a power outlet if you're using a notebook WITHOUT an expensive adapter.
     
  8. macrumors 65816

    plinkoman

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2003
    Location:
    New York
    #8
    ummm, powerbooks are dvi, and powermacs do have both dvi and adc. ibook is vga with some adapter thingie
     
  9. macrumors 68000

    Daveman Deluxe

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2003
    Location:
    Corvallis, Oregon
    #9
    What I'm saying is that there should be two ports on the back of the Apple display: one for DVI and the other one that just carries power and USB.

    I knew about the PBs having DVI, as well as about the desktop machines having it. The problem is that the PBs require an expensive adapter to be able to use the display, which I think is criminal.
     
  10. macrumors 65816

    benixau

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #10
    somewhere i saw a ADC extension cable - google it. It may be a dr bott but i am not sure.
     
  11. macrumors 68000

    ZildjianKX

    Joined:
    May 18, 2003
    #11
    I completely agree. I actually don't like Apple Studio displays since they don't have DVI inputs... actually most LCD manufacturers have dual inputs, DVI and VGA... very handy.
     
  12. macrumors 604

    iJon

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    #12
    i personally love the adc standard. it is one less cable on my desk and i dont waster a plug in on my surge protector. if i want to to use it on a powerbook or my pc, i just use apple coverter box, simple as that.

    iJon
     
  13. macrumors 65816

    benixau

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #13
    ADC would be good if it were a standard. The thing is that it would be the logical thing to do - which is why the pc world will never standardize it.
    Really, ADC wouldn't be so bad if it were easier to get things for it, saaaay like extension cables ........
     
  14. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2003
    #14
    I think ADC is form over function.

    Apple have tried in the past several times to make a new monitor connection- various ones for old powerbooks, the wierd one on 6100's, as well as the long-living connector that was standard on the Mac up until the B&W G3.

    It is a bad idea to intergrate a connection standard like USB into another connector, as we have seen by the USB2 problem.

    It is a bad idea to integrate the power into the cable, because different monitors have varing power requirements- which is why the OP is having trouble with the Dr. Bott extension.

    It also creates headaches for video card manufacturers who need to make special Mac versions of their cards (or even more special than they otherwise would have to be). Anything that discourages video card manufacturers supporting the Mac is a bad thing.
     

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