AIFF's for Archiving?

Discussion in 'iPod' started by mark-itguy, Mar 30, 2007.

  1. mark-itguy macrumors regular

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    #1
    I know now that Apple Lossless is the best for archiving audio CD's, but back before it came out, I ripped a few of my favorite CD's as AIFF files. The CD's were lost during a move. So will using those AIFF's as a source for converting them into AAC's for my iPod good enough? Or are AIFF's lossy enough I'd have to re-purchase the CD's for top quality sound?

    TIA
     
  2. iMeowbot macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

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    #2
    AIFF is a lossless format, you're fine. It's probably also a better choice than Apple Lossless for long term archiving because it's not proprietary.
     
  3. mark-itguy thread starter macrumors regular

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    #3
    Ohhhh yeah, AIFF is lossless also! Thanks. Maybe I knew that then & forgot. You're right, AIFF in not proprietary at all, just not as well known, but not proprietary...
     
  4. iMeowbot macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

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    #4
    Yikes, it's really just the opposite. AIFF is universally supported by now, having been around for a good 20 years. For closed Apple formats, I wouldn't have very much confidence unless/until they make an effort to officially open them up.
     
  5. Diatribe macrumors 601

    Diatribe

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    #5
    It doesn't really make a difference. You can always convert Lossless to wav and then another lossless format. In theory this shouldn't degrade quality, so the argument of proprietary doesn't really work.
     
  6. iMeowbot macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

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    #6
    You're certain that Apple will even be around in 20 or 30 years, and that there will be other software that supports the format then? Frankly, that kind of thinking is silly. If you look at the top ten computer companies from that long ago, most are extinct, no matter how cool they were at the time.
     
  7. Diatribe macrumors 601

    Diatribe

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    #7
    Still doesn't invalidate my fact that you can convert ALAC to Wav or AiFF whenever you want to.
     
  8. iMeowbot macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

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    #8
    Yes, actually it completely invalidates it, unless you are only thinking about the short term. Archiving is for the long term. Do you have any idea how many "common" proprietary file and data formats from as little as 15 years ago, even less, have become major and costly projects to recover because either the software has been abandoned or the supporting hardware is no longer produced? (Yes, that's a rhetorical question, if you know you wouldn't be writing such things.) I know that this problem has even been brought up in the popular media, so it should be well known by now.
     
  9. Diatribe macrumors 601

    Diatribe

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    #9
    What exactly keeps you from converting Lossless to Wav of AiFF the minute you know that nothing supports it anymore?

    It is not like you're gonna find this out AFTER the fact that you have no hardware or software to use it anymore. It's not like iTunes to convert it is just going to disappear along with all notebooks able to run it. :rolleyes:
     
  10. mark-itguy thread starter macrumors regular

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    Mar 22, 2007
    #10
    Thanks for this comment. I have actually wondered about this before. I knew AIFF was not Apple proprietary, and also knew it was gaining support, [I think you can get a package to play them in Linux]. But I did not realize that it was more or less common now. That is good news. It also strenghens the idea that AIFF would be better for long term archiving than Apple Lossless. Say my kids find them in the future when they retire and want to see what the music of the 1980's sounded like. Even if obsolete, they'll probably have at least heard of MP3's, and be able to play the AIFF's and\or convert them to whatever is new then. But it is possible that Apple Lossless could be a codec they'll have no luck playing, converting, or even finding much about...

    I now know AIFF will not only be my archive format of choice going forward, but also won't regret having used it in the past for those CD's that the original discs were lost!
     
  11. Diatribe macrumors 601

    Diatribe

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    #11
    Remember that AIFF takes about double the HD space. If you're really concerned about the future, always make sure you keep a copy of iTunes and a notebook that is capable of running it.
     
  12. mark-itguy thread starter macrumors regular

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    #12
    That is true too! My only thought is, if I am going to rip to archive, going with AIFF, apprantly\probably, will greatly reduce the need for me to ever re-rip then for re-archiving purposes.

    This whole question came up for a 2nd reason. I got stupid once & decided I'd never want to hear certain CD's again. I knew I ripped them, so I gave them away. Later, when I knew more & newer formats had come out, I was bummed to realize I had 'only' ripped them as 120-bit MP3's! Not even VBR.
     

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