DVD studio pro.. 20 GIGS??

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Kingsnapped, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. Kingsnapped macrumors 6502a

    Kingsnapped

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #1
    I'm thinking about purchacing dvd studio pro to run on my powerbook. Upon reading the system requirements, I found out it takes 20 gigs of space. Is this the software itself or built in tutorials? If anybody can clear that up, it would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Laslo Panaflex macrumors 65816

    Laslo Panaflex

    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Location:
    Tokyo
    #2
    20 gigs is not correct, the app itself is only a few megabytes. If you decide to intall all the templates then it is around 2 gigs. I think that it is a typo, it is 2gigs not 20 gigs.
     
  3. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2002
    Location:
    The Bamboo Forest
    #3
    I honestly find it hard to believe the DVD studio pro takes up 20 Gigs of space. I would call Apple and see why it takes up that much room. If they say 20 GB because of maybe a scratch disk sort of thing then it's probably okay. But 20 GB? That's be 5 DVD's to install it! I'm thinking it could be a typo (2 GB might be reasonable). Granted if it is then it occurs many places.
     
  4. WinterMute Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2003
    Location:
    London, England
    #4
    The DVDSP app is a 1.88gig app, that's what they mean, the templates etc. don't take much room, however, all the space needed for the files you could conceivably use to create a DVD MIGHT add up to 10gigs or so.

    I'd say it's a typo.
     
  5. iJon macrumors 604

    iJon

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    #5
    its a typo, only program that takes up near that much is final cut pro 4, 16 gig

    iJon
     
  6. Downdivx macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    Location:
    Fayetteville, NC
    #6
    According to the apple website, DVDSP requires 20 Gigs of free space, not 20 gigs to install.
    The really cool thing about DVDSP (and the reason I'm getting it and I assume you are too) is 2 pass VBR encoding. Since its a professional program it can handle 8.6GB DVD discs, and if you're running 2 pass VBR, the first file would be bigger than 8.6 so it could be trimmed down to 8.6, so you need about 20 gigs of scratch space.
    Hope that helps,
    W
     
  7. Kingsnapped thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Kingsnapped

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #7
    Thanks for your help. It's a very consistant typo, on the packaging as well as the international apple store sites. This is just like the back of the GTA Box set box that says it requires something like 40 megabytes of memory card space. Crazyness.

    I'm not worried about encoding, I just do semi-professional work and I hate iDVD. The iDVD buttons are the buggiest and most flawed thing I've ever seen in an apple program, I'm amazed it wasn't fixed in '04. I also need subtitles for my hard-of-hearing girlfriend on my short films, and it is a major pain in the ass to do in FCE.

    I'm a step closer to getting it though, although I'm not sure I can justify $250 on software I would only use after making a really good short film. Please apple, give us DVDstudio Express! Thanks to FCE, you know there's a market for it.

    /fusterated
     
  8. Downdivx macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    Location:
    Fayetteville, NC
    #8
    DVDSP

    If you're going to publish DVDs, I highly suggest using 2 pass VBR. VBR is the true advantage of DVD. Constant encoding rates are fine for music (with constant changes) or very static video, but with any movement in the video, VBR will make a huge difference in your videos.
    Although I haven't used DVDSP yet, VBR is what allows a major blockbusters to look good on DVD. With VBRs, quick movement on your videos looks great, and slow, static images don't take up much space.
    Eventually, DVDSP features will reach mainstream applications, like iDVD or FCPe. But for now multi-pass VBR requires is a ton of rendering and most consumers simply aren't interested in subtitles. $250 is the academic cost, so I assume you're like me and still in school. If nothing else, get it before you leave school.
    If you ever do professional productions you will want them to look great on DVD, because that is probably your main distribution method. And VBR and subtitles will make a serious impact and look much better than iDVD.
    Just my 2 cents,
    W
     

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