How do I identify a network device from its IP Address?

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by Dave Marsh, Apr 5, 2005.

  1. Dave Marsh macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    #1
    After a brief power outage this morning, I was checking the IP addresses on my home's local network following a DHCP IP address conflict when I rebooted my iMac and found an IP address in DHCP use that I couldn't identify. I got the MAC address, but can't find anything more meaningful to identify the device the Ethernet card is in. I've rebooted the DSL Router a couple of times, and the 10.0.0.4 address remains in use after each reboot. I've also successfully pinged the address, so I know it's live.

    We have a number of hardwired computers, AirPort base stations (configured as bridges, not DHCP servers), and print servers on the network and I thought I had accounted for all of them (some have multiple Ethernet ports in use). I've been wondering if someone outside my home has glommed onto my wireless network, even though I have IP access controls in use in my base stations (I've listed the short list of MAC addresses that the base stations are supposed to accept in the appropriate table in the AirPort Admin Utility).

    Is there a terminal command that will identify something more than the MAC address if I enter the IP address in the command line? I'm just looking for any commands that will help me to identify what kind of device is using that address. For example, <Unix Command> 10.0.0.4? :???:
     
  2. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #2
    In general you cannot find out much about a device from it's IP. You could try seeing if it responds to various networking protocols and go from there. For example if it's a Unix machine it might well respond to ssh or telnet. If its a Windows machine (or a Unix machine running SAMBA) it might well appear on an smbtree (unix command, you need an admin password to run).

    Right now smbtree is not working for me!

    smbutil view //<IP> lists shares on the machine, it might tell you something?
     
  3. kg9ov macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Location:
    In front of a computer...
    #3
    Using the MAC address of the host, you could determine the manufacturer of the Network adapter. The first half of MAC addresses are assigned by manufacturer. 00:0d:93, for example, is the beginning of the MAC address for a NIC manufactured by Apple. This of course assumes that the MAC you have is using the address programmed by the manufacturer and has not been spoofed. A quick Google search turned up this nifty little MAC lookup utility.

    http://www.coffer.com/mac_find/

    Could possibly narrow your search to a specific type of device.

    -Tony
     
  4. redeye be macrumors 65816

    redeye be

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Location:
    BXL
    #4
    you could try using nmap (build from code or instal through fink).

    Do not use it outside of your own network though. That's not quite legal ;)
     
  5. Dave Marsh thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    #5
    Thanks for the replies, folks. Tony's link to identify the vendor cracked this for me. It noted the company was Slim, and that pointed me to my Slim Squeezebox network music player, a device I had completely overlooked. :D
     
  6. MoparShaha macrumors 68000

    MoparShaha

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #6
    This has got to be the coolest program I've seen! Thanks!
     
  7. saabmp3 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    Tacoma, WA
    #7
    If you didn't know about it, then you probably shouldn't be using it outside of your own network :p. Seriously, IT admins and even some ISPs will **** a brick if they see you constantly throwing out those packets.

    BEN
     
  8. MoparShaha macrumors 68000

    MoparShaha

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #8
    Yeah, I've just been messing around with it on my network at home. Actually, I think the program will be quite useful, as I manage several small networks.
     
  9. 840quadra Moderator

    840quadra

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Location:
    Twin Cities Minnesota
    #9

    Look@LAN is also good, if you are stuck with crappy Windows based systems at your IT job..

    Can save you a bit of work when doing some troubleshooting..
     

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