kernel panic

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by swordfish86, Feb 27, 2007.

  1. swordfish86 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    #1
    i just had my mac on sleep, when i stupidly pulled my ipod from its dock without waking the mac up or ejecting the ipod, i suddenly had a kernal panic!
    are these a sign of a hardware problem?
    what exacly is a kernal panic? its purpose ect?
    are they v common?
    does it mean my lovely mac pro is damaged?
    sorry for so many questions, im just trying o get as much info as i can so i can sort these problems in the future!
    many thanks!
     
  2. miniConvert macrumors 68040

    miniConvert

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    Location:
    Kent, UK - the 'Garden of England'.
    #2
    It probably happened because of your removal of the iPod without ejecting it. It is highly unlikely that any damage has been done. Try to remember to eject your iPod in future.

    Kernel Panic

    They're not common, but only indicate bigger problems with your Mac if they become frequent.
     
  3. Nitromaster macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    Location:
    Ireland.
    #3
    Wirelessly posted (NokiaN70-1/2.0539.1.2/SN359380002126483 Series60/2.8 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1)

    The imacs in my school frequently have kernal panics.
    Im going to blame it on the network setup though for 2 reasons:
    1.My user account is in two groups, the year im in and the cad group for that year.Sometimes i can log in to the staff group.
    2.If you change your wallpaper ,on some of the macs it defaults to the aqua blue wallpaper.
     
  4. ~Kat~ macrumors member

    ~Kat~

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2006
    Location:
    Montreal
    #4
    A kernel panic has occurred twice in the last month (since I've added 2 new user accounts) while I was ejecting my iPod. My Mac was not sleeping, I did what I'd always done--wait for my iPod to be updated and when it was safe to disconnect, I pressed the eject button in iTunes. I don't think it was a coincidence that I've added two new user accounts, have 2 iPods on separate accounts, and this happens. It is convenient having multiple user accounts but it's buggy. I hope this will be improved with Leopard which means probably not.
     
  5. piltupso macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2006
    #5
    I am not sure I would blame the multiple user accounts. I am running 5 users on my machine and each account has it own instance of itunes. We are running 3 shuffles a nano and an ipod, one on each of the accounts and no problems so far (crosses fingers). Trouble free since it was set up in August 2006.
     
  6. ~Kat~ macrumors member

    ~Kat~

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2006
    Location:
    Montreal
    #6
    I haven't fared so well with multiple user accounts and 2 kernel panics is just one aspect. I will not have any other user accounts open the next time I need to update or charge the shuffle.

    I've even had my iPod appear on the desktop of another user account when I clearly connected on my Admin account.
     
  7. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Palookaville
    #7
    Any time your Mac is shut down improperly, you're at risk of hard disk directory damage. You should either reboot on the restore disks and run Disk Utility, or reboot into Single User Mode and fsck. The latter is faster, if you know how.
     
  8. akadmon macrumors 68010

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Location:
    New England
    #8
    I admit I dodn't know what fsck is until I googled it. This page suggests one should run fsck once a month, regardless of whether there are any preceived problems with the way the mac is running. Is that right advice?
     
  9. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Palookaville
    #9
    That's overkill, IMO, but I suppose it could not hurt. The instructions on this page are more verbose than necessary. Just typing:

    fsck -f

    ...does the trick. Not sure why anyone would add /sbin/. Same with reboot.
     
  10. savar macrumors 68000

    savar

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    District of Columbia
    #10
    Oops, late to the thread.

    Oh well,

    Kernel Panic occurs when the kernel notices something bad happening in its own memory space. When a regular (aka user space) application (like Safari) does something bad, like accessing memory that doesn't exist, the OS shuts that application down on the assumption that it must have corrupted itself if its doing silly things like that.

    When the same thing happens in code in the kernel, you get a kernel panic. Imagine, for example, that in the above example we are talking about a device driver (ethernet card) instead of a user space application (Safari), and that device driver tries to access memory which doesn't exist.

    Now the kernel realizes that something in its own memory space is possibly corrupt. Because the kernel provides all the basic services of the system, it can't simply just stop itself like it would do with a user space application. So you get a kernel panic instead, which basically is the OS saying "whoa, stop everything".

    If it happens rarely, don't worry about it. If it happens a lot, it means something is wrong with your computer. It is a sign of a problem, not the cause of it. Frequent kernel panics generally have to do with bad hardware (faulty RAM, faulty controller, etc.) or else bad kernel plugins (device drivers, network stacks, file systems, etc.). Usually its easy to troubleshoot because the kernel panics will start occurring shortly after you have installed a new piece of hardware, or software, or both.
     

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