Prevent child from changing Passcode iPod T 4th?

Discussion in 'iPod touch' started by Flybye, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. Flybye macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #1
    Hi all,

    How on earth can I prevent my son from changing the passcode if I tell him what the passcode is to get into the iPod? I'm setting up an iPod I got him for Christmas, setting up all the restrictions, etc. And I noticed one funny thing, restrictions does not have an option to enter the restriction code to change the passcode, or am I missing something?

    I know its pretty self explanatory, but I just spent 30 minutes going to every corner of Settings, so I figured I'd finally ask. :)
     
  2. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #2
    Why do you need him to have a passcode to begin with? I think it would be better off for you to not set one up at all. Solves the problem altogether.
     
  3. Flybye thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #3
    And if I do not?
    He can still go into settings, create a passcode, and lock me out.
    Him locking me out is what I am trying to prevent. I know I can reset it the iPod, but why bother going through that hassle if there is a way to prevent him from changing the passcode.
     
  4. fenskezen macrumors regular

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    Feb 6, 2011
    #4
    Wirelessly posted

    Tell him if he locks you out even one time the iPod is gone. When my kids were young and I made a statement like that they knew I was serious. If you have followed through on your prior words of "advice", then this will be no problem.
     
  5. Flybye thread starter macrumors regular

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    Sep 10, 2009
    #5
    Guess this just comes down to the fear of father. :D
     
  6. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #6
    How old is this child? If you don't trust him, why are you giving him an expensive device? At least it's just an iPod and not an iPad!
     
  7. fenskezen macrumors regular

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    Feb 6, 2011
    #7
    Wirelessly posted

    Or maybe more important ... Fear of losing the iPod. ;)
     
  8. Flybye thread starter macrumors regular

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    Sep 10, 2009
    #8
    He is 9.5yrs old.

    Well the iPod is for starters. If he can prove himself, then I may upgrade him to the iPad mini.

    I'm sure he won't change it, but I just like to prevent the annoyingly possible. :)
     
  9. fenskezen macrumors regular

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    Feb 6, 2011
    #9
    Wirelessly posted

    Good plan. And a great age to begin proving himself trustworthy. First comes the iPods, next the family car!
     
  10. AppleDApp macrumors 68020

    AppleDApp

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    #10
    It is odd that there isn't a setting for this also keep in mind that to set restrictions for apps and iTunes content the passcode to access that menu is the same passcode used to unlock the device. so your child can easily change the restrictions as well.
     
  11. faroZ06 macrumors 68040

    faroZ06

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    #11
    Why would he even want to lock you out? Especially if you just say that he can't do that, he probably won't.

    ----------

    No, it's not. My iPhone's passcode is 2222. My restrictions passcode is a different code that I don't give out.
     
  12. AppleDApp macrumors 68020

    AppleDApp

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    Jun 21, 2011
    #12
    How did you set that up?
     
  13. faroZ06 macrumors 68040

    faroZ06

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    Apr 3, 2009
    #13
    When you enable restrictions, it asks you for a restrictions code. You can type in whatever you want. If you've already set one, you can disable restrictions then enable it again to set a new code. I don't know why it doesn't let you set a new code without disabling it then enabling it, but doing so set all of my restriction settings back to default :/

    This is on iOS 6, but I'm pretty sure it was like this in iOS 4 and 5 too.
     
  14. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #14
    Yeah, the password is different in the restrictions area, vs the one to unlock the device. They both have different purposes. There is no way for him to change restrictions period, unless he restores the device entirely.

    My brother has done that to us in the past with his iPod, and what I usually do (because there is pretty much no discipline in this house :rolleyes:) is tell him that there's an update coming out and I want to have it done for him for when he gets home. Never has said no to giving me the number then.

    I also go through his iCloud account every few days just to check around.

    Definitely would like stuff like, "This iPod's passcode has ben changed" messages that I could get in my e-mail though.
     
  15. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #15
    Uh...

    I'm not a parent here, but it seems the best way to teach a kid not to change a passcode is to tell him that if he does, he'll be suspended from using it for a while.

    And then actually suspend him.

    Thought this may require more work than simply setting a four-digit code.
     
  16. fenskezen macrumors regular

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    Feb 6, 2011
    #16
    Wirelessly posted

    And the beauty of this plan is, it will translate through life as the responsibilities get bigger. In a way it builds trust both ways...
     
  17. Androidfan1x macrumors regular

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    Oct 8, 2012
    #17
    You need to educate your kid and trust him, or just don't give him anything
     
  18. jarron macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2011
    #18
    I cannot believe no one has suggested this yet, but...


    Why not use provisioning profiles, make it a non-removeable profile and just have the profile set a password. The password cannot be changed then. Search the Apple forums on Mobile Provisioning Profiles.

    :)
     
  19. riptide747 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2012
    #19
    Just my view, don't give your kid expensive stuff at such a young age. It will only make him ungrateful and not appreciate the things he has. I know numerous kids who have gotten everything they've ever wanted and are spoiled brats not caring about anyone but themselves and expecting everything while giving nothing in return.
     
  20. Bruce Taylor, Dec 22, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 25, 2015

    Bruce Taylor macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2015
    #20
    The feature you are looking for should be extremely easy for Apple to implement and I have no idea why they will not do it. As the "guy who knows how to do all that computer stuff" I end up taking care of all the issues for friends and family.
    Since you are just speculating about what your child "might" do, you do not know all the REAL perils out there. Everyone here who suggested you are lacking in parental skills can just go away. You were not asking for advice on how to parent your child, but instead, a way to use technology to completely avoid the potential issue. Do these people give their children a pack of cigarettes and a lighter and tell them not to smoke???? There are plenty of other ways to teach your children responsibility without the added hassle of all the time and work that goes into resetting an IOS device. Especially when it was never set up with iTunes in the first place.
    Here are the REAL issues with this lack of a restriction. I have had this happen multiple times. Three times, a friends child changed the passcode on their iPod, and FORGOT IT. And yes, they really did forget it because they were the one that entered the wrong passcode in until it LOCKED. It wasn't a case of the parent locking it trying to guess the child's passcode. The first time it took me several hours to figure out how to restore the device especially since it had never been backed up to iTunes. The child was then told NOT to use a passcode at all, but eventually did it again and forgot again. The second time, was quicker since I had done it recently. After that time the parental skills were applied, but a year later it happened again. The discipline as suggested, was enforced, and the child ended up not having an iPod for 6 months. She had it, but couldn't use it because it was locked. Then I was asked to do it again and had to research the fix due to the time that had passed. In case you don't know, the only way to do this is to RESET the device which forces any IOS update to happen at the same time, so now you have to wait for a 1.5 GB download to happen. Also, the instructions are horrible. The device tells you the iPod is locked and to connect to iTunes, but when you do it is not clear what you do next and if you try to restore it, iTunes tells you to "respond on the phone to allow access" which is of course impossible. So iTunes doesn't even know it is connected to a locked device.
    Then there is my elderly mother who was having trouble accessing the internet on her iPad and was convinced the problem was that she wasn't being prompted for her passWORD. So she tinkered around in the settings and clicked on "add a passCODE" (she didn't have one before that) and used the iPad until it asked for the passcode. She entered it in wrong multiple times. Waited the allotted time each time it timed out, and eventually locked it. It had also never been backed up to iTunes. My sister who lives on the other side of the country, bought it for her and said "it's so easy to use" and before I had a chance to get involved, she was already using it, so I didn't bother jumping in and insisting on all those "dumb nerd things" that the geniuses out there think we just do to try and prove we know something. And then what I mentioned above happened. No iTunes backup. Locked device. And the best part of all for those of us who "fix" these issues........the "What happened?" question, always followed by the denials "I didn't do that" or "Why do they let you do that????" I DON'T KNOW MOM. I DIDN'T WRITE IOS........ And the icing on the cake, "Where is all my stuff???" and my favorite "Where are all MY YouTube videos?" "I don't know mom, maybe you erased YouTube in the process???????"
    By the way, it turns out that the initial problem was that she turned on airplane mode which was why she couldn't get on the internet in the first place. By the time she called me, she had already locked it.
    And all this could be solved by adding a restriction on changing or adding a passcode. Some things are a necessary evil, but I can't for the life of me figure out why this lack of restriction would be necessary........
     
  21. schlitzz macrumors newbie

    schlitzz

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Location:
    Bremerton, WA "Home of the Bremaloes!!"
    #21
    Keep in mind that the kid can wipe the device, by holding the home button at a restart, and then plugging it into the computer. The passcode is a minor issue. You want to monitor the backups, and anything stored online. If the kid is hacked, that's gonna go bad, like bullying......
     
  22. akadafni macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2015
    #22
    Well in order to change the passcode you have to know the passcode. If it were me I would probably setup the touch id(if it's a newer device) with his fingerprint and make the passcode one that you as the parent have access to. That way he can still use the device and do what he wants but gives you some control if he messes up or proves to not be trustworthy.

    A note about technology and parenting. To stay ahead of what kids might do using their technology, parents have to be interested in learning about the technology themselves. I say that because most parents end up having to call for tech support when the kid screws up. Also, most parents are buying the products for their kids so they have a bit of vested interest. Parents should let their kids know that the kid is just borrowing the technology and it can be taken away at any time.
     

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