Prevent child from changing Passcode iPod T 4th?

Discussion in 'iPod touch' started by Flybye, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #1
    Hi all,

    How on earth can I prevent my son from changing the passcode if I tell him what the passcode is to get into the iPod? I'm setting up an iPod I got him for Christmas, setting up all the restrictions, etc. And I noticed one funny thing, restrictions does not have an option to enter the restriction code to change the passcode, or am I missing something?

    I know its pretty self explanatory, but I just spent 30 minutes going to every corner of Settings, so I figured I'd finally ask. :)
     
  2. macrumors 604

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #2
    Why do you need him to have a passcode to begin with? I think it would be better off for you to not set one up at all. Solves the problem altogether.
     
  3. thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #3
    And if I do not?
    He can still go into settings, create a passcode, and lock me out.
    Him locking me out is what I am trying to prevent. I know I can reset it the iPod, but why bother going through that hassle if there is a way to prevent him from changing the passcode.
     
  4. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    #4
    Wirelessly posted

    Tell him if he locks you out even one time the iPod is gone. When my kids were young and I made a statement like that they knew I was serious. If you have followed through on your prior words of "advice", then this will be no problem.
     
  5. thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #5
    Guess this just comes down to the fear of father. :D
     
  6. macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #6
    How old is this child? If you don't trust him, why are you giving him an expensive device? At least it's just an iPod and not an iPad!
     
  7. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    #7
    Wirelessly posted

    Or maybe more important ... Fear of losing the iPod. ;)
     
  8. thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #8
    He is 9.5yrs old.

    Well the iPod is for starters. If he can prove himself, then I may upgrade him to the iPad mini.

    I'm sure he won't change it, but I just like to prevent the annoyingly possible. :)
     
  9. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    #9
    Wirelessly posted

    Good plan. And a great age to begin proving himself trustworthy. First comes the iPods, next the family car!
     
  10. macrumors 68020

    AppleDApp

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    #10
    It is odd that there isn't a setting for this also keep in mind that to set restrictions for apps and iTunes content the passcode to access that menu is the same passcode used to unlock the device. so your child can easily change the restrictions as well.
     
  11. macrumors 68040

    faroZ06

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    #11
    Why would he even want to lock you out? Especially if you just say that he can't do that, he probably won't.

    ----------

    No, it's not. My iPhone's passcode is 2222. My restrictions passcode is a different code that I don't give out.
     
  12. macrumors 68020

    AppleDApp

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    #12
    How did you set that up?
     
  13. macrumors 68040

    faroZ06

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    #13
    When you enable restrictions, it asks you for a restrictions code. You can type in whatever you want. If you've already set one, you can disable restrictions then enable it again to set a new code. I don't know why it doesn't let you set a new code without disabling it then enabling it, but doing so set all of my restriction settings back to default :/

    This is on iOS 6, but I'm pretty sure it was like this in iOS 4 and 5 too.
     
  14. macrumors 604

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #14
    Yeah, the password is different in the restrictions area, vs the one to unlock the device. They both have different purposes. There is no way for him to change restrictions period, unless he restores the device entirely.

    My brother has done that to us in the past with his iPod, and what I usually do (because there is pretty much no discipline in this house :rolleyes:) is tell him that there's an update coming out and I want to have it done for him for when he gets home. Never has said no to giving me the number then.

    I also go through his iCloud account every few days just to check around.

    Definitely would like stuff like, "This iPod's passcode has ben changed" messages that I could get in my e-mail though.
     
  15. macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #15
    Uh...

    I'm not a parent here, but it seems the best way to teach a kid not to change a passcode is to tell him that if he does, he'll be suspended from using it for a while.

    And then actually suspend him.

    Thought this may require more work than simply setting a four-digit code.
     
  16. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    #16
    Wirelessly posted

    And the beauty of this plan is, it will translate through life as the responsibilities get bigger. In a way it builds trust both ways...
     
  17. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2012
    #17
    You need to educate your kid and trust him, or just don't give him anything
     
  18. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2011
    #18
    I cannot believe no one has suggested this yet, but...


    Why not use provisioning profiles, make it a non-removeable profile and just have the profile set a password. The password cannot be changed then. Search the Apple forums on Mobile Provisioning Profiles.

    :)
     
  19. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2012
    #19
    Just my view, don't give your kid expensive stuff at such a young age. It will only make him ungrateful and not appreciate the things he has. I know numerous kids who have gotten everything they've ever wanted and are spoiled brats not caring about anyone but themselves and expecting everything while giving nothing in return.
     

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