Seamless glass frame?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Bocheememon, Apr 6, 2006.

  1. Bocheememon macrumors regular

    Bocheememon

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Location:
    Fertile, MN
    #1
    I don't know where to find this, but my instructor mentioned I can have this done for my work. She said it was a seamless plexiglass/glass frame.

    It is two sheets of plexiglass/glass, one thicker and the other sheet thinner to be used as backing pressed together with my image seamlessly between the two. Does anyone know an online vendor where I can purchase such a frame?
     
  2. Chip NoVaMac macrumors G3

    Chip NoVaMac

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    Dec 25, 2003
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    #2
    Sounds like a nice look, but I never want my photographs touching glass. :eek:
     
  3. Peyton macrumors 68000

    Peyton

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    #3
    Yep. they have them at linen and things, bed bath and beyond, and garden ridge. I think also a meijer.

    I was planning on giving one as a gift (with an autographed picture inside) to a friend. What happens when a photo comes in contant contact with glass? curious!:confused:
     
  4. Bocheememon thread starter macrumors regular

    Bocheememon

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Location:
    Fertile, MN
    #4
    Bocheememon

    Well, it should be fine if it touches glass. It would be a c-print or something like that.

    I think those sizes may be small :( I'm talking 16x20 and up. And they are also very thin in thickness level.

    I wish I could remember where they are. My instructor was very vague...
     
  5. Peyton macrumors 68000

    Peyton

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    #5
    Well actually, I've only seen these about 8x10 and smaller... sorry...google:confused:
     
  6. Bocheememon thread starter macrumors regular

    Bocheememon

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Fertile, MN
    #6
    Hi!

    Peyton: Google has got nothing for me.

    I might just build them myself, since they would be easy to create. I just wanted something that was seamless with no bolts and very high-art cool.

    Directions: 2 sheets of plexiglass. Some bolts (4 of them or just go bolt happy). Spray adhesive.

    Make sure the photo is acid free and that the adhesive is photo-safe. Just mount the photo onto the plexi and press it down with something heavy for about 15 minutes or so (That's my guess haha).

    If you are blessed with a framing setup and a lovely heat press, I will be extremely jealous. You could have your local framer heat-press the picture for you instead of putting weight on the piece.

    Once done, drill as many holes you would like to have and place your bolts and screws in them. Depending on the size/weight of the frame, you can use fishing wire or metal wire to wrap around the bolts so you can hang it.

    Creative ideas are to frost the area around the picture with a sandblaster or use spraypaint to create a matte border. All painting and frosting should be done in the interior, using the front glass.

    And...that's all I can think of!

    Whee~! Better get up early in the morning for this!
     
  7. Chip NoVaMac macrumors G3

    Chip NoVaMac

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    #7
    At the sizes you are talking about, one might expect pieces that are meant for long term display - or sold as art pieces.

    C-prints, or even luster or glossy inkjet prints, would be a concern for me as one that has sold and given prints in the fine art setting. Maybe things have changed, my concern goes back many years.

    Keep us posted.
     
  8. Bocheememon thread starter macrumors regular

    Bocheememon

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Location:
    Fertile, MN
    #8

    Hi Chip!

    The only thing I know about photo display is using UV glass.
    What exactly happens to a c-print or any other print when they are placed in regular glass? Is the longeivity greatly reduced?
     
  9. Chip NoVaMac macrumors G3

    Chip NoVaMac

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    #9
    Not sure how much print life is reduced with non-uv glass. There might be info on the Wilhelm Research web site.

    The interesting thing is the life of some of the newer inkjet printers can exceed c-prints.
     

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