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View Full Version : The proper way to charge your iPhone




lavrishevo
Aug 18, 2007, 07:06 PM
I wanted to start this thread because of the lack of knowledge people have about a lithium ion battery compared to the older ni-cad battery.

First The is lithium ion batteries DO NOT develop a memory so people thinking you should drain your battery till it is almost dead and then charge it because of the "memory" of the battery are wrong.

Second The charge cycle for a iPhone battery is from dead to fully charged. So charging your battery often means many less full cycles. A lithium-ion battery provides 300-500 discharge/charge cycles. The battery prefers a partial rather than a full discharge. Frequent full discharges should be avoided when possible. Instead, charge the battery more often. There is no concern of memory when applying unscheduled charges.

A lithium-ion battery in use typically lasts between 2-3 years. The worst condition is keeping a fully charged battery at elevated temperatures, which is more a problem with running laptop batteries. If used on main power, the battery inside a laptop will only last for 12-18 months.

So again:

Avoid frequent full discharges because this puts additional strain on the battery. Several partial discharges with frequent recharges are better for lithium-ion than one deep one. Recharging a partially charged lithium-ion does not cause harm because there is no memory. (In this respect, lithium-ion differs from nickel-based batteries.)

Keep the lithium-ion battery cool. Avoid a hot car. For prolonged storage, keep the battery at a 40% charge level.

I Hope this sheds some light on the subject. If you do not believe me please feel free to research it yourself.



legaleye3000
Aug 18, 2007, 07:51 PM
Thanks for the info :)

rottcodd
Aug 18, 2007, 08:10 PM
See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_ion_battery

MyJelleo
Aug 19, 2007, 05:10 AM
This is great info. Thanks a bunch.

IDANNY
Aug 19, 2007, 05:38 AM
thank you i have been thinking about this allot

7racer
Aug 19, 2007, 05:53 AM
From Apple:

http://www.apple.com/batteries/iphone.html

http://www.apple.com/batteries/

DoFoT9
Aug 19, 2007, 05:59 AM
thankyou for these tips

i suppose these tips (hardly ever discharge fully) apply to lithium mbp batteries aswell??

ecks618
Aug 19, 2007, 06:20 AM
thankyou for these tips

i suppose these tips (hardly ever discharge fully) apply to lithium mbp batteries aswell??

Yep, Lithium Ion Batteries are opposite of the Nickel Metal Hydride batteries, like those in remote controlled cars and such, in that Lithium ion last longer the less you fully charge. NiMH batteries need the whole memory thing and "prefer" to be fully discharged before a full charge.

DoFoT9
Aug 19, 2007, 06:29 AM
Yep, Lithium Ion Batteries are opposite of the Nickel Metal Hydride batteries, like those in remote controlled cars and such, in that Lithium ion last longer the less you fully charge. NiMH batteries need the whole memory thing and "prefer" to be fully discharged before a full charge.

in the sense that you shouldnt charge them to full capacity?? or you shouldnt leave them on full charge for extended periods of time?

legaleye3000
Aug 19, 2007, 06:43 AM
I want to know if I have my MBP plugged in most of the time, is that bad?

kdarling
Aug 19, 2007, 08:55 AM
Most of the information you see posted comes from:

http://batteryuniversity.com/

Check out Part 2 - How to Prolong Life

question fear
Aug 19, 2007, 10:01 AM
in the sense that you shouldnt charge them to full capacity?? or you shouldnt leave them on full charge for extended periods of time?

In the sense that you don't need to drain and then charge fully, you can toss it on the charger at 40% and charge to full. No need to wait for it to go dead.

tjespo22
Aug 19, 2007, 03:38 PM
thanks for the info man!

megfilmworks
Aug 19, 2007, 04:10 PM
Great advice, spot on. Thanks!

DoFoT9
Aug 19, 2007, 05:38 PM
In the sense that you don't need to drain and then charge fully, you can toss it on the charger at 40% and charge to full. No need to wait for it to go dead.

okies thanks for verifying that

lavrishevo
Aug 19, 2007, 05:52 PM
For your laptop I would use the program below and not take your battery out. Fan Control will keep your laptop cooler and hence your battery.

I set to Base RPM at 2000
low temp @ 106 F
high temp at 169 F
and then just see how much cooler your laptop will run.

http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/23137

Running on battery and need the juice to last as long as possible? Just go back in and pull the base speed down a little to like 1200 or 1500.

lavrishevo
Aug 22, 2007, 07:51 AM
Just wondering of anyone tried the fan control program? Let me know if you had good results?

lavrishevo
Sep 5, 2007, 10:51 AM
For the ones who had not sen this.

domcole
Jul 12, 2008, 02:40 PM
Hi, thanks for this thread; along with others I've been thinking about this quite alot.

What should I/we do about the first charge?

From what I've gathered it comes with a bit of 'juice' Do I just need to connect it to the mains straight away and [B]leave[B] it for a few hours before I start using it?

Any help would be appreciated.

bmms8
Jul 12, 2008, 02:46 PM
thanks for the great information. Smc fan control is great and I night recommend it.

bmms8
Jul 12, 2008, 02:50 PM
Hi, thanks for this thread; along with others I've been thinking about this quite alot.

What should I/we do about the first charge?

From what I've gathered it comes with a bit of 'juice' Do I just need to connect it to the mains straight away and [B]leave[B] it for a few hours before I start using it?

Any help would be appreciated.

I think the battery comes charged. I just started to use it. Once you start to sync remember it will also charge.

know-it-all5
Jul 12, 2008, 02:52 PM
Ok so I have a car charger for my iphone. Does this mean that it is actually a smart idea, to pop it in the charger whenever i get into the car?

Auzburner
Jul 12, 2008, 03:06 PM
Thanks for this thread. I have been wondering about this exact thing for awhile and never got such direct answers for the iPhone. Thanks again...

ChazDaSpaz
Jul 12, 2008, 03:25 PM
I knew about some of these facts already but are you telling me that it's actually BAD to drain battery from 100% to 10% and recharge back to 100%? I thought that lithium batteries could handle it.... :(

So you're saying that it's better to use from 100% to say 50%, then recharge to 75% etc?

know-it-all5
Jul 12, 2008, 03:53 PM
Ok so I have a car charger for my iphone. Does this mean that it is actually a smart idea, to pop it in the charger whenever i get into the car?

Sorry guys, its important.

applemax
Jul 12, 2008, 04:14 PM
With the iPhone, will it still require a long first charge?

hwong
Sep 4, 2008, 02:19 PM
I wanted to start this thread because of the lack of knowledge people have about a lithium ion battery compared to the older ni-cad battery.

First The is lithium ion batteries DO NOT develop a memory so people thinking you should drain your battery till it is almost dead and then charge it because of the "memory" of the battery are wrong.

Second The charge cycle for a iPhone battery is from dead to fully charged. So charging your battery often means many less full cycles. A lithium-ion battery provides 300-500 discharge/charge cycles. The battery prefers a partial rather than a full discharge. Frequent full discharges should be avoided when possible. Instead, charge the battery more often. There is no concern of memory when applying unscheduled charges.

A lithium-ion battery in use typically lasts between 2-3 years. The worst condition is keeping a fully charged battery at elevated temperatures, which is more a problem with running laptop batteries. If used on main power, the battery inside a laptop will only last for 12-18 months.

So again:

Avoid frequent full discharges because this puts additional strain on the battery. Several partial discharges with frequent recharges are better for lithium-ion than one deep one. Recharging a partially charged lithium-ion does not cause harm because there is no memory. (In this respect, lithium-ion differs from nickel-based batteries.)

Keep the lithium-ion battery cool. Avoid a hot car. For prolonged storage, keep the battery at a 40% charge level.

I Hope this sheds some light on the subject. If you do not believe me please feel free to research it yourself.


My only concern is what Apple says about recharging the lithium ion on their laptops. They say a regular basis to drain the battery completely and recharge fully. Wouldn't the same principles apply to the iphone?

NDimichino
Sep 4, 2008, 02:30 PM
in the sense that you shouldnt charge them to full capacity?? or you shouldnt leave them on full charge for extended periods of time?

I've read for the longest battery life in the iPhone to keep it between 20% and 80% capacity with frequent charges to keep it between that area.

I usually just throw it on the charger in the car, getting about 15-20 minutes of juice a couple times per day, then of course if I need some in the morning when I'm in the shower or something. I usually don't charge the phone for more than a half hour at a time.

My battery life has been better, and i have done the same with my MacBook with the same results. Seems to really work.

I tried finding the article, but I couldn't... I think it was on Engadget but I really don't remember.

NDimichino
Sep 4, 2008, 02:31 PM
Ok so I have a car charger for my iphone. Does this mean that it is actually a smart idea, to pop it in the charger whenever i get into the car?

Sorry guys, its important.

From what I've read, yes. That's exactly what I do. Sorry I didn't see your quote earlier or I would have included it in my prior response.

Megalobyte
Sep 4, 2008, 02:43 PM
While it is true that you should avoid as best you can letting the iphone's battery run all the way down, (by all the way, I mean to the 20% or 10% warning):

1) In real world use, there will be times when despite your efforts it does run down to 20%, 10% or all the way, as long as you don't make a habit of it, and try as best you can to avoid it, your battery will be OK, its OK if it happens here and there, long as it's not running all the way down too often. Just do your best to prevent it from happening by charging the battery whenever you get a chance, as was said, no worries about memory effect.

2) You are supposed to, about once a month, let it run all the way down until it shuts itself off and says to charge it, then, charge it fully and undisturbed, like for 4-5 hours or so, this calibrates the battery's charge meter and gives you a more accurate power remaining indicator. Keep in mind, the battery gets to a 90% full charge relatively quickly, about 2 hours, but takes another 2 hours to get the last 10%, so, it may look fully charged in 2 hours, but generally it's not, unless it has been charging for about 4 hours, so, when doing your once a month calibration full discharge/full recharge, don't unplug it prematurely, make sure the lightning bolt inside the little battery icon has changed into a plug.

3) You can't overcharge the battery, once it reaches full charge, it stops charging the battery, there's no danger letting it charge overnight.

milani
Sep 4, 2008, 03:54 PM
Here is what I want to know: is it better to charge your battery to 100% (regardless of where the charge was at - 10%, 50%, 80%), or is it ok to charge it to whatever level you want, and will that type of behavior have any long term effects on the health of the battery?

To be more specific: does it hurt the battery if you plug your phone in for 5 minutes, just to give it say 10% more juice? I ask this because whenever I charge my devices I never unplug it from a charge until it's 100% charged, but my friend has no problem plugging in his devices for 5 minutes, 10 minutes, whatever it takes to get a bit more charge so he can use them right away.

Overall, when he DOES charge his battery to 100%, he almost always has a dead battery long before I do. This happens on all of his devices, including his iPod, camera, and his iPhone, whereas my battery in those devices always lasts much longer. Thoughts?

hwong
Sep 4, 2008, 04:02 PM
Here is what I want to know: is it better to charge your battery to 100% (regardless of where the charge was at - 10%, 50%, 80%), or is it ok to charge it to whatever level you want, and will that type of behavior have any long term effects on the health of the battery?

To be more specific: does it hurt the battery if you plug your phone in for 5 minutes, just to give it say 10% more juice? I ask this because whenever I charge my devices I never unplug it from a charge until it's 100% charged, but my friend has no problem plugging in his devices for 5 minutes, 10 minutes, whatever it takes to get a bit more charge so he can use them right away.

Overall, when he DOES charge his battery to 100%, he almost always has a dead battery long before I do. This happens on all of his devices, including his iPod, camera, and his iPhone, whereas my battery in those devices always lasts much longer. Thoughts?


Here's what Apple says:
For proper maintenance of a lithium-based battery, itís important to keep the electrons in it moving occasionally. Be sure to go through at least one charge cycle per month (charging the battery to 100% and then completely running it down).

http://www.apple.com/batteries/iphone.html

ishopukisfake
Sep 4, 2008, 08:05 PM
A lithium-ion battery in use typically lasts between 2-3 years. The worst condition is keeping a fully charged battery at elevated temperatures, which is more a problem with running laptop batteries. If used on main power, the battery inside a laptop will only last for 12-18 months.



I usually run my main laptop through the mains with the battery in, do you think the battery will be prolonged if you took it out when attached to the mains?

s8film40
Sep 4, 2008, 08:46 PM
I was at my local Apple store the other day waiting for a genius appointment and watched as the genius explained to the woman in front of me that she needed to drain her battery completely every time before she recharged it. Needless to say when he got to me I didn't take his advice too seriously which by the way was that I had too many applications on my phone. He said that unless the application came from a reliable company I couldn't trust it and should not download it.

Babiipiink
Sep 4, 2008, 09:26 PM
wow thank you! i didn't know that!