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wdlove
Mar 19, 2004, 01:27 PM
Soft drink giant Coca-Cola has admitted it is selling purified tap water in a bottle.

It says the source for its new Dasani bottled water is the mains supply at its factory in Kent.

The company says Dasani is "as pure as bottled water gets" due to a "highly sophisticated purification process".

But the UK water industry is worried that the marketing of the product implies tap water is impure, which experts say is not the case.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/3523303.stm

jsw
Mar 19, 2004, 01:39 PM
Soft drink giant Coca-Cola has admitted it is selling purified tap water in a bottle.

It says the source for its new Dasani bottled water is the mains supply at its factory in Kent.

The company says Dasani is "as pure as bottled water gets" due to a "highly sophisticated purification process".

But the UK water industry is worried that the marketing of the product implies tap water is impure, which experts say is not the case.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/3523303.stm

Of course tap water is impure ("pure" = 100% H20, 0% anything else). But that doesn't mean it's unsafe.

I think the water industry is overreacting. If Coke had said Dasani is "as safe as bottled water gets", then they'd have something to gripe about...

jxyama
Mar 19, 2004, 01:43 PM
it is borderline deceiving, but i remember looking at a bottle of dasani and basically thinking that it's not spring water - that it's purified water. so i kinda figured the source could be anything.

so it's not all that surprising, i guess. it is, however, a big deal for them to have to publically equate that dasani source is tap water...

edesignuk
Mar 19, 2004, 01:46 PM
Yup, read about this last week. Cheeky f**ks! Selling us back our own water from a tap in Kent for 95p a bloody bottle!!!!!!!

MongoTheGeek
Mar 19, 2004, 01:47 PM
Of course tap water is impure ("pure" = 100% H20, 0% anything else). But that doesn't mean it's unsafe.

I think the water industry is overreacting. If Coke had said Dasani is "as safe as bottled water gets", then they'd have something to gripe about...

Especially because it was just yanked in the UK for containing a carcinogen (which came in from the tap.)

http://www.thisislondon.com/til/jsp/modules/Article/print.jsp?itemId=9740821

There is no advantage to bottled water over tap water, unless you listen to Art Bell and are a member of the John Birch society and believe that fluorine is added to the water to pollute our essence.

They used to sell bottled NYC tap water under the brand "Big Apple Juice". It sold well.(no pun intented).

edit: spelling

Savage Henry
Mar 19, 2004, 03:00 PM
Yup, read about this last week. Cheeky f**ks! Selling us back our own water from a tap in Kent for 95p a bloody bottle!!!!!!!


It made me laugh.

When a company as big as Coke doesn't spend enough money or time on research.

Imbeciles.

eyelikeart
Mar 19, 2004, 03:07 PM
Nothing new really. Bottled water is truly a ripoff, whether purified & healthy or not.

sonofslim
Mar 19, 2004, 03:19 PM
They used to sell bottled NYC tap water under the brand "Big Apple Juice".

it's not as bad as it could be. i used to live in Buffalo, where the water comes from Lake Erie. it doesn't matter how much filtering it goes through before it hits your tap; up there, the water always tastes... a little off. especially during the summer, when the heat & the sun put a nice algae bloom on the lake.

wdlove
Mar 19, 2004, 03:25 PM
Nothing new really. Bottled water is truly a ripoff, whether purified & healthy or not.

They found a niche and exploited the need. I first heard about this on the radio this morning. They said that in the US Dasani uses spring H20 from an area that is known to be the freshest in North America. I just wonder why they didn't do the same thing in Europe.

OnceUGoMac
Mar 19, 2004, 03:52 PM
It's what you guys get for paying for water anyways. :rolleyes:

jsw
Mar 19, 2004, 04:04 PM
They found a niche and exploited the need. I first heard about this on the radio this morning. They said that in the US Dasani uses spring H20 from an area that is known to be the freshest in North America. I just wonder why they didn't do the same thing in Europe.

They process whatever they start with anyway, so I guess it's pure marketing that they say they get it from the "freshest" source in North America. Not that it isn't all pure marketing anyway...

I wonder how they determine "freshest". Is there some natural site that recombines hydrogen and oxygen in quantity? :)

Counterfit
Mar 19, 2004, 04:42 PM
Yup, read about this last week. Cheeky f**ks! Selling us back our own water from a tap in Kent for 95p a bloody bottle!!!!!!! It's not like you're the first guys to do that. There's a company that bottles Houston tap water and the sells it, but I don't recall if they filter it any more before bottling.

it's not as bad as it could be. i used to live in Buffalo, where the water comes from Lake Erie. it doesn't matter how much filtering it goes through before it hits your tap; up there, the water always tastes... a little off. especially during the summer, when the heat & the sun put a nice algae bloom on the lake. I know what you mean. The water in my town always has a faint taste and odor to it. I'm not quite sure what it is, but it's annoying and tastes like crap. So for drinking it's Brita and Poland Springs. Tap water has been relegated to filling the Brita, cooking, and cleaning people/clothes/dishes.

Makosuke
Mar 19, 2004, 05:15 PM
Yeah, my tap water tastes a bit funny, but a Brita or Pur filter takes care of that, and feels a whole lot less stupid than paying a company to run the same water through pretty much the same filter and put it in a plastic bottle.

The funny thing is, if you go into a supermarket (Safeway, where I live), and go to the bulk water section, you've got two choices: Spring water, and "Drinking water (from a municipal source)". Both are $1 a gallon, but if you buy the one with the red label, you've just paid $1 for a gallon of tap water in a 5 cent plastic milk jug. Go, brainac.

Sun Baked
Mar 19, 2004, 05:23 PM
It's NOT Soda.

What some people will do to get away from chlorinated/florinated water.

There's quite a few Water/Ice shops around AZ that do the filtering/dechlorinating for you, but the problem with this -- people don't take the time to sterilize the water jugs, and they keep them in their AZ garages, so the water in these jugs is generally worse than tap water (aka warm/dechlorinated water + unsterilized jugs).

The filtration systems and softeners are fine, when they're maintained.

So bottled water is generally easier for the terminally lazy, if not slightly healthier than water stations and ill-maintained filtration/softner systems.

cr2sh
Mar 19, 2004, 07:43 PM
It's what you guys get for paying for water anyways. :rolleyes:

As someone who spends 3weeks a month on the road working.. I'll tell you, I'd be miserable without "paying for water." A lot of the water, in a lot of the cities I visit, tastes horrible. I have no problem paying $1 for water that tastes good and is safe.

Ever drink the water out of a hotel bathroom sink? Its disgusting, that's no way to live.

cheekyspanky
Mar 19, 2004, 07:44 PM
Just to clarify, the carcinogen wasn't from the original tap water, it was caused from part of the production process

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/3550063.stm

I hope they don't bother putting it back on sale, I have no idea who will buy it now, first they admit its just tap water, and then they have to recall it because its breaches regulations!

And from the poster who asked why they don't use spring water for the product in Europe...well they do, just not in the UK! Whether that is an indication of the quality of our tap water, or just an attempt to screw us over I'm not sure!

If I do drink bottled water I tend to go for Volvic or Evian anyway.

MongoTheGeek
Mar 19, 2004, 07:49 PM
it's not as bad as it could be. i used to live in Buffalo, where the water comes from Lake Erie. it doesn't matter how much filtering it goes through before it hits your tap; up there, the water always tastes... a little off. especially during the summer, when the heat & the sun put a nice algae bloom on the lake.

I used to live in Pittsburgh. The stuff comes out of the Mon...

iMeowbot
Mar 19, 2004, 08:11 PM
Just to clarify, the carcinogen wasn't from the original tap water, it was caused from part of the production process

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/3550063.stm

That's kind of funny, calcium bromate is still used in some commercial baking in the US, I think an incident like this one would only be reportable in California.

Krizoitz
Mar 19, 2004, 09:32 PM
Soft drink giant Coca-Cola has admitted it is selling purified tap water in a bottle.

It says the source for its new Dasani bottled water is the mains supply at its factory in Kent.

The company says Dasani is "as pure as bottled water gets" due to a "highly sophisticated purification process".

But the UK water industry is worried that the marketing of the product implies tap water is impure, which experts say is not the case.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/3523303.stm


Heh, this confused me for a second at first. Here in Washington (state) we have a city called Kent as well, so my first thought was, why in the world would they use a factory in Kent, they don't have factories in Kent, besides we have the Cascade Mountains right here with glacier fresh spring water...oh wait...BBC...original Kent...heh. Of course whenever I hear Arlington I think of the small town north of where I live, THEN the city over in Virginia. Well atleast when i hear Seattle I know thats us!

evoluzione
Mar 19, 2004, 09:35 PM
As someone who spends 3weeks a month on the road working.. I'll tell you, I'd be miserable without "paying for water." A lot of the water, in a lot of the cities I visit, tastes horrible. I have no problem paying $1 for water that tastes good and is safe.

Ever drink the water out of a hotel bathroom sink? Its disgusting, that's no way to live.


i hear ya. tap water isn't that nice in my opinion. where i used to live in england, the tap water is sooo chalky, and here in nyc, well, it scares me the amount of rusty cruddy piping it has to go through. i buy bottled water all the time, it does confuse me though how they sell a half gallon bottle for $1.29 and a gallon bottle for $1.49. still can't work that one out. :rolleyes:

flyfish29
Mar 19, 2004, 10:15 PM
AquaFina is Pepsi's tap water. They say it is from a PWS #4453456 or something like that which simply means public water source...look on dasani, and I guarantee you it will say the source but will be letters.

briankonar
Mar 19, 2004, 10:52 PM
it's not as bad as it could be. i used to live in Buffalo, where the water comes from Lake Erie. it doesn't matter how much filtering it goes through before it hits your tap; up there, the water always tastes... a little off. especially during the summer, when the heat & the sun put a nice algae bloom on the lake.

thats the lake that caught on fire from all the **** floating around in it right?

serves anyone who buys bottled water right, dumb bastards. water is water is water, the source you get it from affects the taste due to mineral deposits (which are actually good for you in some cases) plus the fact that America adds flouride to it's water sources or we'd all have rotting teeth from Coca Cola's other products (mmm fizzy death, but i love it).

Applexilef
Mar 20, 2004, 12:14 AM
I guess they should change their names to "Tapsani" and "Tapquafina" then

JesseJames
Mar 20, 2004, 06:50 AM
Do you guys know that the brand 'Evian' is 'naive' spelled backwards?

sonofslim
Mar 20, 2004, 09:42 AM
Do you guys know that the brand 'Evian' is 'naive' spelled backwards?

i guess they figured it sounded better than "elbillug."

maxterpiece
Mar 20, 2004, 10:22 AM
i hear ya. tap water isn't that nice in my opinion. where i used to live in england, the tap water is sooo chalky, and here in nyc, well, it scares me the amount of rusty cruddy piping it has to go through. i buy bottled water all the time, it does confuse me though how they sell a half gallon bottle for $1.29 and a gallon bottle for $1.49. still can't work that one out. :rolleyes:

Hey just look at soda - the 16oz. bottles are always $1.29. The 2 liter bottles are often 99 cents. Who buys a 2 liter when they are on the go though??

Datazoid
Mar 20, 2004, 10:35 AM
The tap water where I live (Davis, CA's untreated (except for chlorine) groundwater) has a faint bluish tint quite noticable when filling a tub or the like. It also tastes absolutely horrid, bad enough that I've seen several newspaper reports on it (eg. this one (http://www.davisenterprise.com/articles/2003/09/29/news/094new0.txt)). Add to that the fact that we have a known problem with selenium and nitrate contamination in the water (although in recent years it has gone under the MCL, there have been many violation years, and our arsenic levels may be in violation when new state regs go into effect), boron levels high enough to kill plants, preliminary state water surveys have shown very high chromium-6 (anybody seen Erin Brockovich?) concentrations, and there is a known Superfund site in town that, according to the EPA, does not have groundwater migration under control. Thirsty? Neither am I.

G4scott
Mar 20, 2004, 11:53 AM
Heh, I just talked to my brother about bottled water... He did a case study for some class. He said that here in Texas, a regional chain of grocery stores has their own brand of 'spring water', imported from Alaska to compete with evian. Then, they use San Antonio tap water to compete with something that comes from Houston's tap water (I might be wrong on this, but I think it's right...)

I just can't see who would pay so much for something like evian, which is just french water. If you have a good water filter in your house, or wherever you live, you can usually take all the bad taste out of the water... That's what I do with my Brita filter in my dorm, and it works great.

wdlove
Mar 20, 2004, 01:31 PM
I use a Brita water filter at home also. Boston water is claimed to be petty safe. The main problem that I have is an old lead pipe that brings water into my house. I plan to replace it the nest time some needed work is done on my house.

MrMacMan
Mar 21, 2004, 12:20 AM
You are all lame.


Water is not good untill you have ATLEAST 2% Lead in your water.


Every 4 cups of water I drink I get my 100% daily requirement of Lead!



Come on guys where is the fun? :p

Awimoway
Mar 21, 2004, 10:59 AM
Brita only filters out the chlorine, making the water taste better. It won't do anything for lead or other serious contaminants. You need to get a heavy duty filter for that.


I like bottled water because it tastes better than most tap water.

thecow
Mar 21, 2004, 04:33 PM
In my house I have a reverse osmosis filter and the water from that tastes a lot better than the tap water. It is $300 to $450 if you install it yourself and it filters out almost everything.Reverse osmosis (http://www.freedrinkingwater.com/products.htm)

takao
Mar 21, 2004, 06:02 PM
hmmthis thread makes me wonder again... i can't imagine not being able to drink tap water....
arsenic,chlorine,lead,flouride in the water ? urgh sounds terrible

i guess i'm spoiled by our tap water which is quality wise not very different from the water sold in bottles..(BTW evian tastes not very special ...try instead some
real 'mineral water' (http://www.roemerquelle.com/engl/index.htm) , ....the got bought by Coca-Cola Company sadly enough perhaps they will export them around the world who knows)

idkew
Mar 21, 2004, 06:11 PM
It's not like you're the first guys to do that. There's a company that bottles Houston tap water and the sells it, but I don't recall if they filter it any more before bottling.

I know what you mean. The water in my town always has a faint taste and odor to it.

The tap water where I live (Davis, CA's untreated (except for chlorine) groundwater) has a faint bluish tint quite noticable when filling a tub or the like. It also tastes absolutely horrid, bad enough that I've seen several newspaper reports on it (eg. this one).


mmmmmm Chicago water is good. Good old Lake Michigan.

Flynnstone
Mar 21, 2004, 11:30 PM
All this talk of bottled water is making me thirsty ... for a beer :D
To go to the other extreme, pure 100% H20 is not good for you either. I'm not talking distilled be cause it still has some "impurities", but high "scrubbed" water using for (typically) the electronics industry. This water, which is very close to "pure" water is harmful in that it will "suck" the metals right out your cavities.

themadchemist
Mar 21, 2004, 11:36 PM
Nothing new really. Bottled water is truly a ripoff, whether purified & healthy or not.

Yeah, I'm with you...Especially in the US.

In a country like India, it is wise to boil & filter your own water...Otherwise, you'll get all sorts of nasties. Bottled water doesn't work, because lots of it is just regular water put into brand-name bottles.

Abstract
Mar 21, 2004, 11:56 PM
Its strange how people buy tap water because it contains less minerals in it. That's actually not true. Lots of the minerals found in water are good for you, so the more of it found in water, the better. Why are people trying to get rid of it? Is it the media, or is because people don't know anything about it and are just gullible? Lots of these "impurities" are good for you.

Anyway, some places have higher demands of their tap water than they do for the bottled water industry, so buying bottled water doesn't mean anything. Germany is an example of such a country.

I've neutron irradiated tap water in Toronto at a nuclear reactor (some elements can grab an extra neutron to become radioactive, and you can look at the radiation energies emitted to determine the minerals in the water, and how much of it is present...), and compared the mineral content of 6 types of minerals in the water, and I can honestly conclude that Toronto's tap water is just as good as most bottled water from around the world. I compared it to around a dozen different bottled water companies from over 8 different countries. I can't remember the details, and am too lazy to check, but I can say that San Benedetto (sp?) of Italy has 2 or 3 times the amount of minerals than the tap water in most countries.

MrMacMan
Mar 23, 2004, 10:35 PM
Water is priced to kill... for no reason at all.


How about you just put your water through a normal filter, and then boil it just in case...

Bottled water is for suckers. Please.

Sun Baked
Mar 23, 2004, 10:52 PM
Microwaving pure H2O can be hazzardous to your health, since it won't boil.

It will heat up past the boiling point and instantly boil (aka explode) the second you drop anything into it.

jsw
Mar 24, 2004, 01:24 PM
Bottled water is for suckers.
Especially with those pull-out "nipples". Yum!

Of course, some people do pour the water into their mouths, but you're right - most suck it.

jsw
Mar 24, 2004, 01:26 PM
Microwaving pure H2O can be hazzardous to your health, since it won't boil.

It will heat up past the boiling point and instantly boil (aka explode) the second you drop anything into it.

Well, it's hard to find water thatpure in your house. And "explode" might be a wee bit of an exaggeration.

But, yeah, it's cool to see.

2jaded2care
Mar 24, 2004, 02:16 PM
Actually, I believe that the superheated water "exploding" is a pretty accurate description, based on eyewitness accounts. The problem is usually when water is microwaved in a smooth container (smooth ceramic coffee mug). It does get hotter than its boiling point, without being able to boil. Apparently, when something triggers the boiling action, it is pretty violent. (Don't try this at home.) I've heard you should put a wooden coffee stirrer in the cup before heating to avoid this.

Also, at risk of telling people what they already know, you shouldn't refill regular bottled water bottles too much. Not only does bacteria breed, but the plastic begins to break down from reuse and can release unhealthy chemicals into your water:

http://www.hsibaltimore.com/ea2003/ea_030213.shtml

Use bottles intended for frequent use, such as a Nalgene.

jsw
Mar 24, 2004, 02:43 PM
Actually, I believe that the superheated water "exploding" is a pretty accurate description, based on eyewitness accounts. The problem is usually when water is microwaved in a smooth container (smooth ceramic coffee mug). It does get hotter than its boiling point, without being able to boil. Apparently, when something triggers the boiling action, it is pretty violent. (Don't try this at home.) I've heard you should put a wooden coffee stirrer in the cup before heating to avoid this.


I stand corrected. I still say it'd have to be pretty pure liquid and a pretty smooth cup to get the rapid reaction you describe - enough to justify "explode" - but I see that it's possible. I guess that, without any catalyst like a small particle or rough surface, nothing seeds the boil. Presumably, even a toothpick would fix this.

2jaded2care
Mar 25, 2004, 11:20 AM
Link: http://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/~jw/superheating.html

Interesting video of the "superheated water" phenomenon.

I thought most people already knew Dasani was "purified" tap water. Interesting that the bromate levels were too high for UK standards, but not for the rest of the "continent" or US.

Mmmm...bromate...

jsw
Mar 25, 2004, 02:17 PM
Link: http://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/~jw/superheating.html

Interesting video of the "superheated water" phenomenon.

I thought most people already knew Dasani was "purified" tap water. Interesting that the bromate levels were too high for UK standards, but not for the rest of the "continent" or US.

Mmmm...bromate...

Cool! Again, I'd say "explode" is too extreme, but it's a decided danger. Guess I'll wear oven mitts all the time (the nifty new silicone ones that are waterproof (http://fantes.com/images/8884pot_holders.jpg) ).