AT&T didn’t waste any time dumping their net neutrality


LIVEFRMNYC

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Oct 27, 2009
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I'm not sure if that's such a great example.

Especially since you mentioned T-mobile, which has done the same not to long ago, with specific music streaming services not being counted, while lesser known streaming services would be counted.

I don't think people can make an argument against what they signed up for. Either you're eligible for the beneficial exceptions or not. As long as nothing is throttled.
 

Michael Goff

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Jul 5, 2012
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I'm not sure if that's such a great example.

Especially since you mentioned T-mobile, which has done the same not to long ago, with specific music streaming services not being counted, while lesser known streaming services would be counted.

I don't think people can make an argument against what they signed up for. Either you're eligible for the beneficial exceptions or not. As long as nothing is throttled.
T-Mobile will allow anyone to be part of it simply through special compression algorithms. All they have to do is work with the carrier to do it. AT&T is charging money at a rate that means nobody can make money. That's why you only see services that don't have to make a profit doing it, or possibly more accurately ones that don't have to prove they paid in the first place.
 
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LIVEFRMNYC

macrumors 604
Oct 27, 2009
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T-Mobile will allow anyone to be part of it simply through special compression algorithms. All they have to do is work with the carrier to do it. AT&T is charging money at a rate that means nobody can make money. That's why you only see services that don't have to make a profit doing it, or possibly more accurately ones that don't have to prove they paid in the first place.
Thanks for clarifying that.

But wouldn't that fall under another category, like a version of some antitrust law, rather than them reneging on Net Neutrality?
 

Michael Goff

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Jul 5, 2012
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Thanks for clarifying that.

But wouldn't that fall under another category, like a version of some antitrust law, rather than them reneging on Net Neutrality?
Yes and no. The way it falls under net neutrality is that you're not supposed to have paid priority. That's why TMo was considered okay but AT&T was going to be slammed by Tom Wheeler. TMo isn't charging anything and anyone can sign up. AT&T has the second part, but not the first.
 

LIVEFRMNYC

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Oct 27, 2009
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Yes and no. The way it falls under net neutrality is that you're not supposed to have paid priority. That's why TMo was considered okay but AT&T was going to be slammed by Tom Wheeler. TMo isn't charging anything and anyone can sign up. AT&T has the second part, but not the first.
Oh okay. I never knew the details of the agreement Tmobile had with those services.
 

Lloydbm41

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Oct 17, 2013
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Oh okay. I never knew the details of the agreement Tmobile had with those services.
Exactly what was said above. T-Mobile also has a free Netflix deal for our consumers, but we don't have paid fast lanes and we don't block other services. T-Mobile has 'in writing' at every store a net neutrality pledge at every register.
 
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