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Jon N.

macrumors member
Nov 28, 2023
31
17
I would not put it past Google, especially if stuff stays on Apple's vs Google's servers, and messaging will continue to be balkanized and SMS used as fallback...
I actually have the same concern but in the opposite direction: When my Android device is involved in a group chat with iPhone users (all of whom use iMessage because Apple refuses to allow anything else), every once in a while the group text gets wonky and I end up missing messages or their delivery is delayed. Maybe this is just a weakness in the SMS/MMS protocol (which Apple insists on continuing to use, despite how clear it is that SMS and MMS have long outlived their usefulness), or maybe it's an issue just with how iMessage is encoding its messages. But my worry is that that Apple will do something else to make the RCS experience as bad as it is now with SMS/MMS. I suppose only time will tell -- for both of our concerns.
 

Jon N.

macrumors member
Nov 28, 2023
31
17
'my experience' would be textbook definition of anecdotal.

usage of WhatsApp doesn't really prove there isn't a confusing ux in iMessage with how it relates to sms/iMessage

I am unsure what your point is. Are you saying that the iMessage interface is confusing?
 

jlc1978

macrumors 603
Aug 14, 2009
5,513
4,292
What "account" does the intended recipient need to have? The whole point of a platform-independent and standards-based messaging system is that it should work as long as the user has an app that implements the standard. Are you referring to an iCloud account? If so, how and why should that matter?

It sounds like the only advantage you're suggesting would be a blue versus green bubble? And frankly, that seems trivial.

All the other "superior features" of iMessage are provided by other apps -- whether that's iMessage itself after RCS is implemented, or WhatsApp.
My point was that in the current state of affairs, SMS is the only real cross platform protocol that works between various apps. Others, such as What’s App, require an account to be used; even if the protocol is based on an opens source one, so sending messages cross app is still not possible. At least with iMessage it’s baked into every iPhone; even if it is not a superior app. Ubiquitousness is a superiority al of its own, to paraphrase an old statement.
 

Jon N.

macrumors member
Nov 28, 2023
31
17
My point was that in the current state of affairs, SMS is the only real cross platform protocol that works between various apps. Others, such as What’s App, require an account to be used; even if the protocol is based on an opens source one, so sending messages cross app is still not possible. At least with iMessage it’s baked into every iPhone; even if it is not a superior app. Ubiquitousness is a superiority al of its own, to paraphrase an old statement.
Okay, I understand your point now. And yes, if anyone wants to replace the current SMS/MMS technology, it's important to have an app on the phone that doesn't require creating another account. But, here once again, it's Apple who is preventing that from happening by refusing to allow any such apps (because they would compete with iMessage) to be available to users in the App Store. If Apple made Google's messaging app available on the Apple Store, or if they made their own iMessage available in Google's Play Store, then people would have the choice. But Apple famously doesn't want to do either of those things.
 

Aoligei

macrumors 6502a
Jul 16, 2020
901
981
Okay, I understand your point now. And yes, if anyone wants to replace the current SMS/MMS technology, it's important to have an app on the phone that doesn't require creating another account. But, here once again, it's Apple who is preventing that from happening by refusing to allow any such apps (because they would compete with iMessage) to be available to users in the App Store. If Apple made Google's messaging app available on the Apple Store, or if they made their own iMessage available in Google's Play Store, then people would have the choice. But Apple famously doesn't want to do either of those things.

The only way for truly universal messaging standard that replaces SMS/MMS is both platform’s default messaging app need to support same standard.

Currently, Google is mandating all Android phone support RCS as standard messaging protocol. The only logic way now is Apple to adopt RCS on its messaging app.

To be honest, I don’t believe allowing Google Message app on iOS would change anything. Most iOS user would use default messaging app, aka Messages on iOS.
 

truthsteve

macrumors 6502a
Nov 3, 2023
855
2,521
I am unsure what your point is. Are you saying that the iMessage interface is confusing?
I'm not going to rehash and summarize the conversation that you jumped into.

Read the past responses and you'll literally find the answer to your question.
 

Jon N.

macrumors member
Nov 28, 2023
31
17
I already did actually.

You: " Are you saying that the iMessage interface is confusing?"
Me earlier in the thread: "blue vs green bubbles is already confusing for many." https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...-communication-services.2411654/post-32744605

You just admitted that you failed to read. That's great so I'm moving on.
See? Now, was that so hard after all? You could have provided that link earlier, and it wouldn't have necessitated you copping an attitude with me.

Now, if you spent half as much time in critical thought and reason as you do spewing bad attitude, this could have been resolved much earlier.

Or you can continue being confrontational with no reason. Your choice.
 
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