Keep Ubuntu replace Mac OS X

Nuctorn

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 29, 2010
9
0
Hi,
I got a MacBook pro 7.1, and got Mac osx lion and Ubuntu 12.04 lts installeer using rrefit . Now i would like to install Windows 8 and keep Ubuntu. Someone any idea how i could do this?

Thx
 

Apple2

macrumors member
Feb 28, 2010
94
0
Providence, RI
Just wipe the OSX partition and install win8 through the DVD after formatting the partition in Ubuntu. I see no reason why this wouldn't work, but check with someone else before doing it. And by the way, I'd install Win7 instead. Win8 seems like it dropped a lot of features.
 

Nuctorn

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 29, 2010
9
0
Oke thnx, i'm going to try it. If someone else has experience with it, help is always welcome. (I'll post how i did it if i succeed)
 

AppleMacFinder

macrumors 6502a
Dec 7, 2009
796
143
Why do you need Ubuntu on Mac? Mac OS X is 100% UNIX certified,
so all the terminal commands work in Mac OS as well. I don't get it. :confused:
 

Nuctorn

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 29, 2010
9
0
Why do you need Ubuntu on Mac? Mac OS X is 100% UNIX certified,
so all the terminal commands work in Mac OS as well. I don't get it. :confused:
I need it because, i need it for my thesis.(I'm in my last year industrial engineer in beglium, thesis=final big project). Xilinx does not support mac os x.
Xilinx supports debian distribution, but it works on ubunut as well after installing some missing libaries.
 

throAU

macrumors 604
Feb 13, 2012
6,614
4,158
Perth, Western Australia
Why do you need Ubuntu on Mac? Mac OS X is 100% UNIX certified,
so all the terminal commands work in Mac OS as well. I don't get it. :confused:
In addition to what the OP posted:

Linux is not Unix.

Even if we discount the fact that the app may be compiled only for linux, and was only a shell script...

The userspace commands are all GNU, whereas OS X is BSD. The command line switches are often different, behaviour of a lot of the command line tools is different, etc.

OS X is more true to unix and 100% unix certified sure.

But Linux isn't.
 

AppleMacFinder

macrumors 6502a
Dec 7, 2009
796
143
From my experience: every time I found a Linux program that I want to run on my Mac,
I just compiled it from source (because of lack of pre-built binaries) and everything worked.

Of course, if you don't have the source (probably, this Xilinx thing is closed-source)
then there could be a problem.
 

murphychris

macrumors 6502a
Mar 19, 2012
661
1
Hi,
I got a MacBook pro 7.1, and got Mac osx lion and Ubuntu 12.04 lts installeer using rrefit . Now i would like to install Windows 8 and keep Ubuntu. Someone any idea how i could do this?
Yes, I've written about how to do this in the forums before. I advise against it unless you're really brave because it's totally convoluted. You do realize that there isn't support from Apple for Windows 8 yet? And that unless you do the necessary leg work, that it will boot on Apple hardware in CSM-BIOS mode and thus be subject to some not so insignificant limitations? You're almost certainly better off natively booting an OS that you can boot in EFI mode, and then KVMing the others. Of course, if you can figure out how to EFI boot Ubuntu and Windows, then that's ideal but that's not the usual case.
 

SarmenHB

macrumors newbie
Aug 4, 2010
11
0
Why do you need Ubuntu on Mac? Mac OS X is 100% UNIX certified,
so all the terminal commands work in Mac OS as well. I don't get it. :confused:
not really, the basic commands work but as far as apt-get (ubuntu) commands dont work. Updating apache doesnt work either and its a pain to get the latest version on it.
 

murphychris

macrumors 6502a
Mar 19, 2012
661
1
not really, the basic commands work but as far as apt-get (ubuntu) commands dont work. Updating apache doesnt work either and its a pain to get the latest version on it.
macports.com has apache 2.4.6, modified so it will compile on OS X using XCode. It also has the option to package it for you.

The reasons to run linux on Apple hardware though are highly varied. OS X has some really old GNU binaries these days, as those tools have been moving to GPLv3 licensing. It's unclear what Apple's long term solution to this is, but obviously it's not GNU.
 

SlCKB0Y

macrumors 68040
Feb 25, 2012
3,140
205
Sydney, Australia
100% unix certified sure.
There is no requirement for UNIX certified OSs to maintain binary compatibility between each other and so for the OPs purpose this is pretty much meaningless. IMO UNIX certification is in general pretty much meaningless these days and is pure marketing.

----------

I need it because, i need it for my thesis.(I'm in my last year industrial engineer in beglium, thesis=final big project). Xilinx does not support mac os x.
Xilinx supports debian distribution, but it works on ubunut as well after installing some missing libaries.
Can you not just virtualise Linux and Windows on Mac?

If you're feeling adventurous you could always try WINE:
https://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=25954
;)
 

SlCKB0Y

macrumors 68040
Feb 25, 2012
3,140
205
Sydney, Australia
The reasons to run linux on Apple hardware though are highly varied. OS X has some really old GNU binaries these days, as those tools have been moving to GPLv3 licensing. It's unclear what Apple's long term solution to this is, but obviously it's not GNU.
Which utilities are GPL which don't have BSD alternatives? BASH?

I thought the vast majority were BSD anyways? SAMBA is the only irreplaceable software I can think of in OS X which is GPL.
 

throAU

macrumors 604
Feb 13, 2012
6,614
4,158
Perth, Western Australia
Which utilities are GPL which don't have BSD alternatives? BASH?

I thought the vast majority were BSD anyways? SAMBA is the only irreplaceable software I can think of in OS X which is GPL.
It isn't that there are no alternatives. and no, there is no BSD version of bash. bash is GNU/GPL. there are other shells with different licenses which are not bash.

the command line arguments for many, many commands differ in subtle ways between GNU and BSD. make, awk, tar, etc. It's common enough that in BSD land there's a saying for bug reports by ex-Linux users: "Different from GNU is not a bug". Because it's not. They're different.

Most of the time scripts using most common commands are compatible. Sometimes, they are not.

And this isn't about binary compatibility. This is script compatibility.
 

SlCKB0Y

macrumors 68040
Feb 25, 2012
3,140
205
Sydney, Australia
It isn't that there are no alternatives. and no, there is no BSD version of bash. bash is GNU/GPL. there are other shells with different licenses which are not bash.
I think you missed by point - the previous poster seemed to be implying that the GPL3 meant doom and gloom for OSX and hat most commandline utilities were out of date as a result. I completely dispute that because as far as I can tell, the vast majority of OS X command line utilities are BSD, not GNU (with notable exceptions such as BASH and SAMBA).
 
Last edited:

UncleSchnitty

macrumors 6502a
Oct 26, 2007
851
13
Hi,
I got a MacBook pro 7.1, and got Mac osx lion and Ubuntu 12.04 lts installeer using rrefit . Now i would like to install Windows 8 and keep Ubuntu. Someone any idea how i could do this?

Thx
Without knowing how you have each installed its hard to say exactly how to do it (i.e. is it partitions or did you put a secondary hard drive in your mac book pro or is it off a secondary)

But easiest way is just boot into recovery mode, format your mac os drive or partition, run ubuntu disk or thumb drive and just install it to the old mac partition.

Honestly it doesn't matter to me why you wanted to do it and you didn't ask for opinions on if you should. So as long as you know its obviously not "made for it" then go for it. Personally I would keep a backup of my osx drive just in case but thats me. If ubuntu/windows better suits you or you just want that then go for it.
 

macenied

macrumors 6502a
Aug 20, 2014
637
28
This thread is from 2012.

However, I'd keep OS X as well. You need it at least for Apple's firmware updates.

There are 2 options to install Ubuntu in addition.

1) Create a third partition and install Ubuntu there ( by doing this you will lose your recovery partition but I have installed the recovery partition on an external drive, the Time Machine drive )
2) Virtualize Ubuntu and run it in VMware, Parallels or VirtualBox
 
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