10,000RPM HD or SSD for MBP

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by nyzwerewolf, Aug 16, 2008.

  1. nyzwerewolf macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2007
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    #1
    Hey guys,

    I have a 15.4 inch MacBook Pro. Its got a 5400RPM HD - which im not really satisfied of the performance because I do video editing on my MBP when im away from home. Is there any compatible 2.5 inch internal 10,000RPM HDs or even a good SSD for MacBook Pro?

    Thanks guys!:):)
     
  2. nikhsub1 macrumors 68010

    nikhsub1

    Joined:
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    #2
    IMO SSD's aren't quite there yet in terms of speed, space and cost. There is no 10K RPM laptop drive, there may never be one due to heat and power consumption. Your best bet is to get a 7.2K drive in the size that you need.
     
  3. Firefly2002 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    #3
    Perfectly said. If you want better performance, you're stuck with a 7200 RPM drive.

    SSD really isn't that good right now, and it's bloody expensive, as well as (according to some reports) more draining on the battery unless your HDD is constantly in seek.

    I'd get the fastest 7.2K RPM drive you can find.
     
  4. Pressure macrumors 68040

    Pressure

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    Denmark
    #4
    Intel will be releasing some Solid-state Drives in the near future.

    You can read about them here. They promise 270MB/sec read and 170MB/sec write speed.
     
  5. noodle654 macrumors 68020

    noodle654

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    Location:
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    #5
    And whats the price tag...I have said this many times, SSD is too new and expensive to be used. If I were you I would buy the largest 72k drive, it would be cheaper and more space.

    Wait a few years for SSD.
     
  6. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #6
    Well there is a 2.5" HDD that runs at 10k RPM-->Western Digital VelociRaptor 300GB. If you can manage to get the drive off the 3.5" cooling bracket, fit it in your computer and not melt anything, I'll give you kudos for that.

    Otherwise you're looking at a SSD. Fastest and best is the Mtron 128GB SSD which costs only $3000. It is SLC as well, so you won't have to worry about drive failure for the next 200 years.

    Those cheap SSDs coming out are all MLC which means a few years and they die (but they are cheaper to replace)
     
  7. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    #7
    Just get a WD Studio Drive (silver) (3.5) or any other FW800 drive to go along with an internal 7200 (external can be used for scratch disk or something).

    Don't get anything silly like an eSata card. It is bottlenecked through the express card bus conversion.
     
  8. bartzilla macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    #8
    Wow, hadn't seen that before.

    Is it my imagination or is that whole "bracket" pretty much just a heatsink that's designed to give ducts to pull air from a fan through full time. Good luck to anyone getting that to work reliably in some of the smaller PC cases in that case, let alone any laptop ;)
     
  9. Pressure macrumors 68040

    Pressure

    Joined:
    May 30, 2006
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    Denmark
    #9
    He mentioned nothing about cash being an limitation. Solid-State drives are not for everyone but if you need the performance the option is there.

    It does not have the standard height of 2.5" drives and thus does not fit the MacBook Pro.
     
  10. Apple Ink macrumors 68000

    Apple Ink

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    #10
    Afaik... the Raptor doeant fit in the MB/P (too deep)

    But I'd prefer an HDD over an SSD at this given moment....
     
  11. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

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    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #11
    The heatsink is there because the drive gets very very very hot. It's also a way so the 2.5" drive can fit onto the 3.5" caddies.

    I think it might be able to fit in the 17" (thickness-wise). Not sure though and I'm voiding the warranty on one to try.
     
  12. doctoree macrumors 6502

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    #12
    SSDs will be there in the forseeable future! I would wait
    Doc
     
  13. Jabberwocky246 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2008
    #13
    Just an FYI, the Velociraptor V2 (just released) comes in both 2.5" and 3.5" versions. The 3.5" version is simply the 2.5" drive installed on their "Ice Pack", a heat sink that acts as a 2.5"-to-3.5" adapter.

    Rev 2 changes the location of the SATA/Power connectors on the 3.5" drive in order to make the drive standardized and usable in hot-swap trays.

    This version is available in both 150GB and 300GB capacities.

    The 2.5" drive is definitely too thick for the Macbook and Macbook Pro 15". I'm not at all familiar with the 17" Pro, so I can't say if would work in it or not.

    Anyone else know?
     
  14. freeflywing macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    #14
    =.="...there is no 10k rpm drive for NOTEBOOK yet, the best you can get is the 7k rmp drive.
     
  15. Knolly macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    #15
    I was actually about to mention the Velociraptor...

    I was gonna say something along the lines of there IS a 10K RPM notebook harddrive but it will:
    1. Suck your battery life away.
    2. Likely light your computer on fire.
     
  16. bartzilla macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    #16
    Ah. Makes sense. I think the WD drive is designed for high end workstation / low end server use.

    I'm very likely getting a MBP when they are finally updated, whenever that happens, and I want a 400 or 500mb hard disk in it if I can, whether BTO or DIY.

    I'd rather have more space than a faster spindle speed once we get to 5400RPM or higher disks. Except for a few people doing specialist things that are very disk-bound, I don't think people see much of a real world "day to day" performance improvement from faster disks anyway. I know there is an improvement, I just think that for what most people use a laptop for, it won't actually mean you did more work at the end of the day.
     
  17. tallestof4 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    #17
    I remember seeing express-card ssd drives on google. Be it, the biggest one I saw was 32Gb.
     
  18. cherry su macrumors 65816

    cherry su

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2008
    #18
    MacBook Pro (especially Core Duo) + VelociRaptor = FIRE!!!!!!!!!

    lol a true apple-branded egg frier!!

    but seriously…don't! the left palmrest will be FREAKING BURNING!!
     
  19. mac jones macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    #19
    Hi

    Intel apparently has released their new SSDs as posted above. I've heard that the prices (DO NOT quote me as I may be way off) are around $650 and $1200 for 80GB and 120GB respectively, which if true, is competitive

    reads are around 250MB/s (writes I haven't read about but these apparently these scale up also)

    Note: what's in the Macbook Air now has reads around 45MB/s

    So these drives are going to be very desirable if this is in fact all true
     
  20. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

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    Feb 9, 2008
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    NYC
    #20
    You mean MB/s
     
  21. andrewdale macrumors 6502a

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    Memphis, TN
    #21
    GB/s... Heck, I'd settle for Gb/s.
     
  22. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #22
    Who edits video on their Boot drive? You should always have an external scratch drive. A fast drive, something like 7200RPM over firewire 800 would be a good choice. SSD is not fast enough right now, too expensive, not big enough, et cetera.
     
  23. mac jones macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    #23
    Yes that's right ....sorry :eek:
     

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