10% Of US Doctors Using Epocrates For iphone/touch.

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Goona, Apr 8, 2009.

  1. renewed macrumors 68040

    renewed

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    Bemalte Blumen duften nicht.
  2. Goona thread starter macrumors 68020

    Goona

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    Mar 11, 2009
    #3
    Are you a doctor?
     
  3. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #4
    I'm not a physician, but I use it too... most of the healthcare providers I work with who have iPhones use it. It really is quite useful. And free is nice.
     
  4. kas23 macrumors 603

    kas23

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    #5
    I have it on my iPhone, but for some reason, I just don't use it that much. It just seems easier to grab a computer (which are everywhere) and look up a med. I also have to fix my registration info.
     
  5. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #6
    I use it more when we're conferencing on a patient (or sometimes during a presentation) when I want to know something about a medication... I can do that while we continue the discussion more readily than walk away and grab a computer. Otherwise, though, point taken -- I use a computer if one's available and not ePocrates on my iPhone....
     
  6. emt1 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    #7
    I have it, like it, and use it from time to time. I wish it was WAY faster (see my username. the "E" stands for "Emergency")
     
  7. Dave00 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2003
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    #8
    If you're not using epocrates every day, you're probably not involved in regular prescribing of medications for patients. I use this every single day, and it's extremely valuable. The most helpful aspect is the interaction check. Patients are on 10 or more medicines frequently, and checking for interactions with something new you want to add can save lives. Also dosage changes for decreases in kidney function, checking if a side effect is common with a particular medicine, dosage availability for combination medicines. A market penetration of 10% of doctors is simply stunning for epocrates on the iPhone/touch, and a very good sign for the future of the platform.
     
  8. kas23 macrumors 603

    kas23

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    Oct 28, 2007
    #9
    What a stunningly horrible generalization. I'm a pediatric ER physician and see over 30 patients per day alone. No way would I trust Epocrates over the formulary within my Harriet Lane Handbook. I carry it everywhere I go. That and Micromedex, which is on every computer in the hospital. And, I can't walk 10 feet around here without hitting a computer.
     
  9. wesk702 macrumors 68000

    wesk702

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Location:
    The hood
    #10
    epocrates is pretty horrible in comparison to lexi for the iPhone. Although lexi is paid, I would never reference epocrates daily, especially with the minimal info on there. There's a reason that it's free
     
  10. Dr. Cabrera macrumors 65816

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    Los Angeles
  11. kas23 macrumors 603

    kas23

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    Oct 28, 2007
    #12
    I'm sure every physician who owns an iPhone has download and registered for Epocrates. It was probably one of the first they downloaded, as it's very well-known and best of all, it's free. However, the physicians who actually use it regularly (daily basis) is much different. Saying that 10% of physicians use Epocrates on their iPhone is like saying 10% of adults take their antihypertensives on a daily basis because 10% of adults have been given prescriptions for daily antihypertensives by their physician.
     
  12. Aaleck macrumors 6502a

    Aaleck

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    Oct 11, 2007
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    #13
    Probably very useful considering how many different drugs are out there...
     
  13. loveumms macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    #14
    I'm a physician and I use it quite frequently. I refuse to pay for the subscription though since I can access the same info on the lexi though our at work intra-net.
     
  14. weeman macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    #15
    Wirelessly posted (iPhone : Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 3_0 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/528.18 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/3.1.1 Mobile/7A259g Safari/525.20)

    Epocrates ain't got anything on lexi-complete. By far the best medical application for the iPhone.
     
  15. 1Zach1 macrumors 6502a

    1Zach1

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    Feb 8, 2008
    Location:
    Northern Va
    #16
    :eek: For $300 it better be!
     
  16. southerndoc macrumors 6502a

    southerndoc

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    May 15, 2006
    Location:
    USA
    #17
    I agree. ePocrates' pediatric dosing is often off when compared to Hariet Lane.
     
  17. Cuthbert macrumors regular

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    Feb 4, 2008
    #18
    Harriet Lane is hardly any better. The pediatric dosaging handbook (lexi) is the only way to go. Harriet Lane is close to useless.
     
  18. James L macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2004
    #19
    I'm a paramedic. I find the "Pill ID" section of the program to be very helpful when trying to ID pills at an overdose, when grandma has taken all of the pills out of her bottles and doesn't know what the name of them are, etc.
     
  19. kas23 macrumors 603

    kas23

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    #20
    Oooppps, I guess I've been writing the wrong doses for the last 6 years. :rolleyes:

    You must be a pharmacist (not an insult), because I have never met a pediatric colleague who has ever used Lexi-comp. It's more of a reference guide, rather than a practical tool one would use while seeing patients.
     
  20. wireddoc macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2009
    #21
    Epocrates is way too SLOW

    I am a surgeon who just needs to check the occasional dosing on a med. It's far faster to google it and sort through the junk sites than to wait for Epocrates to boot, load some annoying reminder, encourage me to update, etc.

    I miss the old Tarascon Pharmacopedia. Would love to see this on the iPhone or an Epocrates LITE.
     
  21. Dr. Cabrera macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #22
    the sad thing is, epocrates use to be really fast when it first came out

    I have no idea why there is so much bloat now
     
  22. curmudgen macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2008
    #23
    General Peds

    I am general peds in a out patient clinic setting. Averages per day around 30-40 patients per day.

    I have been using Lexi-Comp since some time back when I had a Treo. I have found too many times "insufficient data" result on ped dosing from the epocrates otherwise I would consider it.

    I personally find the Lexi-Comp exceedingly simple to use, and fast as well. Price tag spread out over a year is a no brainer great deal.

    I also liked the meister series with the icd-9. web based version is good, but I am looking forward to his promised app.
     
  23. dauerhippo macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    #24
    Wow, I never knew there were so many health professionals on this forum!

    I'm a 3rd year medical student, and I am finding epocrates really helpful to look up drugs during rounds. Mostly b/c I know most drugs by their generic names, not by their brand names, so when the attendings reference drugs, I often don't know which drug they are talking about.

    That being said, I REALLY like Lexi for looking up diseases and getting info on the fly about diseases that are new to me. I also use Skyscape's outlines in clinical medicine (OCM) quite a bit, when I have some downtime and feel like learning something.

    Just my .02$
     
  24. DrFillster macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2008
    #25
    Ditto. Another pediatrician who stopped using Harriet Lane back in residency (unfortunately not my username though :eek: )

     

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