10 Things You Probably Didn't Know about the new Imac

Discussion in 'iMac' started by Buerkletucson, Oct 30, 2015.

  1. Buerkletucson, Oct 30, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2015

    Buerkletucson macrumors 6502

    Buerkletucson

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    #1
    Some good information..........

    [​IMG]

    P3
    Apple decided to use a digital cinema industry color standard called DCI P3(Apple calls this P3) in the new iMac. The standard was originally developed for use in digital cinemas so movies would look more realistic (blacker blacks and more vivid colors -- the red of a London bus is the kind of color you’ll only really see using P3 displays). Apple’s decision to adopt the P3 standard means the iMacs provide a 25 percent larger color space than you get from standard sRGB-based displays.

    White
    Panels have forever been lit by white lamps/LEDs, but the white causes problems when reproducing some colors. To get round this Apple developed advanced red-green phosphor LEDs that enable the iMacs to display a much wider range of red, green and blue for better results. This means the new iMac displays are capable of displaying 99 percent of the P3 colour space, according to Apple (see above).

    Gamut
    “We’ve given these a wider color gamut. Basically means they have a bigger palette of colors they can display,” Apple’s Senior Director for Mac Hardware Tom Boger toldMedium. The Retina displays deliver 100 percent sRGB – most other displays only manage 90 percent or less.

    Incidentally
    The iMac is the first cost effective display to support P3.

    Timing
    Most displays are driven by two timing controllers, one for the left the other for the right of the screen. Apple wanted to deliver a more consistent experience, but even the most powerful timing controllers were unable to manage the number of pixels on the 4K and 5L iMac displays. Apple’s solution was to design its own timing controller capable of handling 14.7 million pixels at one. (Even better if you’re handling 4K video edits on movies captured with your iPhone).

    RAW
    The 5K display can show 14.7-megapixel photos at native resolution with a 218ppi pixel density. What does this mean? It means photos can be viewed and altered one megapixel at a time for the best possible final image quality. While images previously converted to lossy image formats such as JPEG won’t benefit too much from improved screen resolution, any images you happen to have around at full-res will deliver much wider color accuracy than you’ve seen before.

    Contrast
    To make contrast better Apple developed a process called photo alignment. This uses UV light to ensure each molecule on the TFT used in the display lies uniformly on the display, so image contrast appears correct.

    Calibration
    Apple puts each newly manufactured Mac through a color calibration process to ensure the colors are exact and meet recognized standards. At its simplest this means that if you display the same image on a line of 100+ newly manufactured iMacs, the picture will appear identical on each one.

    Join
    To make the display join seamlessly to the iMac’s chassis, Apple turned to a process called friction-stir welding. This is a process used to make airplane wings and rocket booster camps. It works by combining intense heat with pressure to cause the molecules of the two aluminum surfaces to mix together in such a robust manner.

    One more thing
    The Fusion Drive’s flash drives are up to 2.5 times faster, because Apple deployed a faster PCI flash in the iMac.





    Source:
    http://www.computerworld.com/articl...y-didn-t-know-about-apple-s-latest-imacs.html
     
  2. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    #2
    Good post, it's this sort of detail that makes macs so damn good, but all you'll hear on here is moaning that they didn't use an NVIDIA video card or include USB C.
     
  3. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #3
    Yeah, that's the main gripe. Not 5400RPM HDDs or anything. :rolleyes:
     
  4. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    #4
    Ah but that that can be changed with an upgrade what I mentioned can't be, you may not like paying more for the options but show me another all in one that comes with an SSD as standard....

    I was more annoyed about the SSD reduction on the 1TB fusion than anything else that seems like the worst sort of penny pinching on a paid for upgrade.
     
  5. photoj2754 macrumors 6502

    photoj2754

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    Location:
    Akron
    #5
    So do I have to select a specific display profile for my iMac to get the P3 or is it using it right out of the box?
    Thanks.
     
  6. photoj2754 macrumors 6502

    photoj2754

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    Location:
    Akron
    #7
    thanks.
     
  7. mattoligy macrumors 6502

    mattoligy

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Location:
    Cloud 9
    #8
    No way Apples quality control (or lack there of) allows for this. Otherwise there wouldn't be people receiving iMacs with dozens of dead pixels...

     
  8. Buerkletucson thread starter macrumors 6502

    Buerkletucson

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    #9
    ......and the super careful egg-like handling of packages by UPS or Fedex would have nothing to do with it, I suppose.

    I highly doubt ComputerWorld would make such statements if there was not some truth to it.
     
  9. mattoligy macrumors 6502

    mattoligy

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Location:
    Cloud 9
    #10
    I have always purchased directly from Apple Stores and I have seen some shocking stuff when opening boxes, and I've opened a lot!
     
  10. Buerkletucson thread starter macrumors 6502

    Buerkletucson

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    #11
    ...and how do you suppose Apple stores get their product?

    Not defending anyone or blaming anyone.... but to say that NO WAY Apple performs this testing is wrong when neither you nor I have any idea.
     
  11. mattoligy macrumors 6502

    mattoligy

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Location:
    Cloud 9
    #12
    There's some pretty interesting documentaries about Apples production line, perhaps you should watch them. I think they reveal why the quality control might be so bad...
     

Share This Page