128GB model faster than 16GB

rui no onna

macrumors G3
Oct 25, 2013
8,341
4,330
That's an interesting point. But you would be very incredibly hard pressed to ever notice it during day to day usage though.
This. Raw sequentials tend to be faster on higher capacity models up to a certain point (I believe 64GB might be fastest). However, I reckon majority of OS and program related tasks are mostly random in nature so it's unlikely you'll notice a difference in normal operation.
 

Leejaymes

macrumors member
Oct 1, 2014
32
0
Bigger capacity phones do have higher IO speeds. You guys can check it out through Antutu - AnTuTu Benchmark by Beijing AnTuTu Technology Limited
https://appsto.re/sg/jtz6V.i
 

gardiboy

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Sep 30, 2011
577
40
Bigger capacity phones do have higher IO speeds. You guys can check it out through Antutu - AnTuTu Benchmark by Beijing AnTuTu Technology Limited
https://appsto.re/sg/jtz6V.i
Yeah but does it benefit the main user in terms of multitasking or all launching?
 

brand

macrumors 601
Oct 3, 2006
4,361
401
127.0.0.1
Bigger capacity phones do have higher IO speeds. You guys can check it out through Antutu - AnTuTu Benchmark by Beijing AnTuTu Technology Limited
https://appsto.re/sg/jtz6V.i
No one is arguing that. In the OP it was asked if the phone runs faster without specifying the IO of the storage system specifically. That means the phone in general and not just benchmark numbers of the storage system.
 

gardiboy

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Sep 30, 2011
577
40
Thanks all for the input.

I started this thread because one of my friends felt that the higher capacity phone was running faster than the 16GB.

Just to confirm on this. I can't test this out as all demo units are 16GB
 

nateo200

macrumors 68030
Feb 4, 2009
2,857
6
Northern District NY
IO's will almost always be faster as the capacity gets higher but it really depends on how the flash memory is set up and what you define as much faster....It will definitely be faster to have a phone with 80GB's of space left than a phone with 0.750GB's of space left...I can say first hand that my old iPhone 4 in 16GB was always much much faster than my dads iPhone 4 in 8GB's on the same firmware update, even though my dad had far less apps on his phone and stuff running in the background he still only had 500MB's left from pictures, video, other, etc. and I also had only about 700MB's left on my iPhone 4 16GB towards the end yet it was always slightly faster. So I guess YMMV. I'll try and compare my 128GB iPhone 6 (before I transfer all my stuff) to another blank iPhone 6 in 16GB's at the Verizon store when I when I go to get my $200 gift card for my old iPhone 4 and set my dad up with my old 32GB iPhone 5c (if anyone is interested I can post here and/or PM them). Personally Its not something I would worry about if you plan to keep your phones storage no more than ~80% full or so...I generally try and go for no more than 65% to 85% full if I can but stuff happens. Not sure if this compares but with the retina MacBook Pro's the larger the flash storage the faster the speeds in terms of IO's/Read and Write speeds. I'd say its probably not worth it to go for the 128GB just for the speed if you really don't need it....I'm sure the 64GB vs the 128GB difference is miniscule in terms of speeds, and like I said before depending on the flash configuration it may vary and the 64 might even be faster than the 128GB!
 

Lobwedgephil

macrumors 601
Apr 7, 2012
4,996
3,634
Thanks all for the input.

I started this thread because one of my friends felt that the higher capacity phone was running faster than the 16GB.

Just to confirm on this. I can't test this out as all demo units are 16GB
Oh its way faster. ;)
 

gardiboy

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Sep 30, 2011
577
40
IO's will almost always be faster as the capacity gets higher but it really depends on how the flash memory is set up and what you define as much faster....It will definitely be faster to have a phone with 80GB's of space left than a phone with 0.750GB's of space left...I can say first hand that my old iPhone 4 in 16GB was always much much faster than my dads iPhone 4 in 8GB's on the same firmware update, even though my dad had far less apps on his phone and stuff running in the background he still only had 500MB's left from pictures, video, other, etc. and I also had only about 700MB's left on my iPhone 4 16GB towards the end yet it was always slightly faster. So I guess YMMV. I'll try and compare my 128GB iPhone 6 (before I transfer all my stuff) to another blank iPhone 6 in 16GB's at the Verizon store when I when I go to get my $200 gift card for my old iPhone 4 and set my dad up with my old 32GB iPhone 5c (if anyone is interested I can post here and/or PM them). Personally Its not something I would worry about if you plan to keep your phones storage no more than ~80% full or so...I generally try and go for no more than 65% to 85% full if I can but stuff happens. Not sure if this compares but with the retina MacBook Pro's the larger the flash storage the faster the speeds in terms of IO's/Read and Write speeds. I'd say its probably not worth it to go for the 128GB just for the speed if you really don't need it....I'm sure the 64GB vs the 128GB difference is miniscule in terms of speeds, and like I said before depending on the flash configuration it may vary and the 64 might even be faster than the 128GB!
Thanks for the info, do post any updates on tests if u have. Thanks!

----------

Oh its way faster. ;)
Sacarsm...?
 

sanke1

macrumors 65816
Nov 9, 2010
1,067
434
Only if there is some sort of SSD Raid controller which is controlling individual NAND chips on 128 GB iPhone 6. But that speed increase would hardly be noticeable during normal iOS operations as iOS is more CPU and GPU heavy.

The only place faster NAND will make difference is while transferring data using iTunes. But even there the speed will be restricted to 30 Mbps due to USB 3 bottleneck.

In short, there would be no way to find out.

Let's hope that Apple finally implements USB 3 in their sync cable for next iPhones and iPads.
 

AxoNeuron

macrumors 65816
Apr 22, 2012
1,240
847
The Left Coast
Yeah but does it benefit the main user in terms of multitasking or all launching?
With NAND flash, increasing capacity doesn't usually increase read speeds all that much, larger capacity mostly only increases write speeds. So that means that something like app load times, boot times, etc. wouldn't be any different between the 16GB and 128GB capacity models.

The difference in speed between capacities does make a difference on computer SSD's in situations where you will be writing hundreds of gigabytes of data copying media or something. But on a smartphone? Even power-users would be very hard pressed to notice a difference in real-world usage. You'd only ever notice it by having two devices side-by-side, a difference so small it's basically an academic argument.
 

Mercenary

macrumors 65816
Sep 17, 2012
1,152
544
What makes people think that higher capacity will be faster? There is zero evidence to suggest this.

I suspect people are confusing storage with RAM. but even then more ram doesn't mean more speed. This stems from the old computer days where PCs didn't have enough expensive ram to run so they would use a swap file. These days they have more than enough so more ram won't mean more speed.

With the iPhone the number is storage, not ram. A 16gb iPhone runs the same speed as the 128gb model. It can just hold more apps.
 

diannao

macrumors regular
Aug 21, 2010
106
0
As nateo200's post indicated, iOS does seem to struggle when the device is low on storage space. I'm not sure what the threshold is, but having filled up devices with podcasts, they run worse with zero or some megabytes free than when they have a gig or so free. YMMV, but that's been my experience.

It's much easier to get a device into a low storage situation when it has 16GB to start with than 128GB.
 
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