13" - 2.3 GHz i5 or 2.7 GHz i7

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by notclosetofour, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. notclosetofour, Feb 28, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2011

    notclosetofour macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2011
    #1
    What is the difference between these two processors? Is it worth the money to jump to the i7 performance-wise? Will the i7 make a difference in CAD and engineering applications or will the performance boost be barely noticeable? Thanks?

    Here is some of the software I might be using...
    Software Possibly Needed
    ArcGIS
    ArcIMS
    ArcPad
    ArcSDE
    Autodesk
    BadCopy Pro
    Gaussian
    GaussView
    Ghost Solution Suite
    JMP
    Maple
    MATLAB
    Mathematica
    NVivo
    PowerTerm Pro
    PuTTY
    SciFinder Scholar
    SHAZAM Pro
    SigmaPlot
    SpinRite
    TurningPoint
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #2
    CAD is not a very CPU-intensive program. "Engineering applications" is not specific enough to make a determination on whether or not the i7 will help you. Probably not, though, since you're asking the question.
     
  3. notclosetofour thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2011
    #3
    Sorry, I'm not really familiar with the software that I might be using but I did edit my OP and put some of the software that the school's website says I might need.

    I don't really see a correlation between me asking the question and the actual amount of CPU I will need. I'm just a high school student trying to accommodate everything I will need for the next 4 years. I don't really know much about processing power so when I read i5 compared to i7, I don't really know what one processor has over another.
     
  4. alust2013 macrumors 601

    alust2013

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    #4
    Oops, I misread. I imagine the two would still be rather similar.
     
  5. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #5
    For a typical undergraduate engineering class you won't need anything spectacular for any of those applications. If you do need major computing power for a large simulation or something like that you'd be using a department-run cluster.
     
  6. notclosetofour thread starter macrumors member

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    Feb 1, 2011
    #6
    Okay, thanks. So the i5 would be sufficient?
     
  7. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    Jul 24, 2006
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    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #7
    I can't imagine why not. Keep in mind you're likely going to need to buy/run Windows on your machine, as some of the programs you mention above are Windows-only.
     
  8. FriarNurgle macrumors regular

    FriarNurgle

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #8
    I recently picked up the 2.3GHz i5 13" and work in Engineering. This system will handle most anything you'll need for undergrad stuff. The laptops we use at work are less powerful than the 13" MBP and will run AutoCAD without issue and will even run solidworks (not amazingly, but it'll run). Stat programs will run well enough even the 2.3GHz i5.
    Good luck.
     
  9. clickmyface macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2011
    #9
    Based on all the geekbench scores (including my own), the 13" i7 is 15% faster than the i5. For $300 more, youd get a 15% faster processor and 180GB more in internal HDD storage (500GB vs 320). Otherwise, the processors are essentially identical. My advice is get the base model and save that $300 or put it toward an external portable drive + Windows 7 license to install via boot camp on the MBP.

    Mac Pricing Matrix
     
  10. SerrQ macrumors member

    SerrQ

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    Jan 10, 2011
    Location:
    Iceland, Reykjavík
    #10
    I'd get the base model and buy a SSD, you'll see much more noticeable speed.
     
  11. elpmas macrumors 68000

    elpmas

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    Where the fresh snow don't go.

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