13" new rMBP worth to have 16gb ram?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by laza, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. laza macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2013
    #1
    MY title says it all. It costs 200$ i know its not upgradeable laters but still, who would need it, right? Like the new PCIe SDD has the capacity to swap whatever it wants with 700MB/s read/write, right? What are you opinions?
    I want to use it for several kind of stuff (PS, AI, CAD, GIS etc.) but any hard load shall go to my desktop that has quad and loads of ram.

    I also heard that the i5 runs a lot cooler and quiter (who has proof?) than the i7. Anything on this?

    So is it more reasonably to buy an i5/8gb/512 than an i5(i7)/16gb/512

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    Boston
    #2
    How will you be using the computer. 16GB is probably needed if you're a heavy photoshop user, but if this is for light office apps, or surfing the web, then no its not needed. It all depends on what you plan to use.

    I went with 16gb on my 2012 rMBP because
    1. Its non upgradeable
    2. I use photoshop, vmware, Aperture sometimes at the same time.
     
  3. brdeveloper macrumors 68020

    brdeveloper

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    Apr 21, 2010
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    Brasil
    #3
    If you're planning keeping your rMBP beyond of Apple Care coverage, i.e. >3 years, it's certainly worth. In 3 years the 8GB will be default and 16GB will barely be the "first upgrade level" in terms of RAM.
     
  4. AlecMyrddyn macrumors 6502

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    Dec 5, 2008
    Location:
    Southern Maine
    #4
    I'm in the middle of the same debate as well: Do I go for the 13" high-end base model (2.6i5/8/512) or upgrade the RAM and processor to 2.8i7/16/512...?

    Keep in mind that while the SSD is more than 10 times faster than a hard drive (~60ish MBps for the 5400 rpm HD to 700 MB/s on the new SSD), RAM access is at least another order of magnitude faster than the SSD. Geekbench is showing benchmark results of over 10 GB/s for RAM read/write speeds.

    My last computer purchase was a 2006 MacBook black (2.0 Core Duo). I maxed out it's memory at "3" GB, and if the HD hadn't died recently, it would still be pretty usable. If I hadn't upgraded the RAM on it, I doubt it would have been functional.

    I want my next computer purchase to last just as long. 8 GB is comfortable for the moment, especially considering Mavericks ability to compress idle memory. What happens 3 years from now when the newest iPhone may be recording 4k video, or has a 25 MP camera? Or when new programs start using more and more memory? Or if I decide to start editing videos?

    You have a desktop to fall back on, which means your RAM intensive work can be done there if needed. But how long do you want this laptop to last?

    I'm leaning toward spending the extra $400 to get the upgraded RAM & processor in the hopes that it helps the computer last at least two years more. $2375 (2.8i7/16/512 @ $2199 + AppleCare from B&H Photo @ $176.19) over 5 years = $475 per year. $1975 (for the Base 2.6/8/512 model + AppleCare) over 3 years = $658 per year. Even if the base model lasted 4 years, it would work out to $493/year. So $400 now does seem worth it, assuming that after 3/4 years 8 GB of RAM would start to be a problem, and the computer continues to work after AppleCare runs out without any repair costs.

    Use your own calculations for how long you will keep it, what you might be able to sell it for when you are done and need/want to replace it, etc.
     
  5. JSalig macrumors 6502

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    Oct 30, 2010
    #5
    I went with 8GB of ram. I like to tell myself that I want a laptop that's going to last beyond 5+ years but I know myself enough to know it's getting replaced around 3 yrs. Most likely sooner. It's a sickness I tell ya.
     
  6. brdeveloper macrumors 68020

    brdeveloper

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    Apr 21, 2010
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    Brasil
    #6
    That's what I think. I like having a computer that I can keep for years. It would be nice if it would allow upgrades to keep it up-to-date for 10 years, but sadly it's impossible even for a Mac Pro. A 2013 Mac Pro with 12-core, 128GB RAM won't resist to the 2023/2024 technology but it will be still a usable machine. You'll have spent around $550-600/year. Of course, for the first 3-4 years you have a blazing fast machine capable of doing everything in the state-of-the-art of computing. You couldn't do it with an entry-level $550 laptop.

    This is what happens in maxed-out macs. The first 3-4 years are in the state-of-the-art window, but after that they are no less than comfortable.
     
  7. JulesK macrumors 6502

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    Dec 17, 2002
    #7
    I went with 16GB of RAM

    I had a slightly different decision (between the base 15" and the "high-end" 15", and went with the high end because after upgrading the base model's RAM to 16GB and its SSD to 512GB, the price was essentially the same (and exactly the same if you upgraded the processor, as well). My alternative was just the base model with the SSD upgrade. But I went with the high-end 15" because even though 8GB should be more than fine now and for the next 3 years, this laptop is relacing a 2006 MBP that is barely cutting it, and we want this computer to last as long.

    I have a 11" MBA, and although I really love it and plan to keep for another four years at least, I would much rather have had 8GB of RAM in it. I know that all the current MBAs have 4GB as the base configuration (as does the 13" non-retina MBP), so presumably Apple expects that to be fine for the foreseeable future. Still, if you keep your laptops until they stop working (and Apple laptops have been great for me ever since the second version of the 12" MBP), spending a bit more now makes sense, particularly since you can't upgrade the RAM later. Hopefully, companies like OWC will come up with a good SSD upgrade that will be cheap in 3-4 years, but who knows.
     
  8. logicsuggests macrumors member

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    Aug 31, 2008
    Location:
    Australia
    #8
    I choose 16GB of RAM. To start with, I run a lot of tabs in the background across multiple browsers which chews up quite a bit of ram, add to that, my main workflow requires me to be in multiple large project files concurrently.

    I'd rather have the headroom now, even if it's like 4-6GB. The fewer times I run into RAM limits the less the system will have to resort to writes on the SSD for use as a scratch disc (which is what my current system is doing every day).

    Also, the 16GB of RAM is a key differentiator between the Air's and the Pros. If you look back just a few weeks prior to the launch of the new line the only thing the 13" Retina had going for it was the screen res and cpu speed, the air was equal or better in every other aspect aside from connectivity.
     
  9. laza thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2013
    #9
    Very helpful words guys thanks! Tho Im not sure if I would keep this comp for 4-5 years I would rather go with the 16gb of ram. I already feel my setup gimped since I have to choose a dualcore to get the 13" mbp.
     
  10. Beau10 macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 6, 2008
    Location:
    Downtown San Diego
    #10
    I'm not a big fan for buying for the future when it comes to Apple products. I realise alot of people keep their machines for 3-5 years, and I did so routinely up until the late '00s, but nowadays it makes little sense.

    1) Resale cost is fantastic for Macs.
    2) Refurb deals are fantastic for Macs. Apple has your back in the machine is not like new.
    3) TimeMachine is fantastic to make a switchover relatively painless.
    4) RE: AppleCare. Despite the errant time you may find yourself out a display or video card on a Mac laptop, amortized over a lifetime of laptop purchases you're losing out. That 10-20% extra cost you're spending on each laptop for 2 years of extended warranty probably covers probably less than a 5% calculated loss during that time period.

    Seriously, if you find yourself with a machine that is at want for more RAM/SSD/Speed sell it and buy a refurb that meets your needs at that time. Ignore AppleCare. You'll break even or even come ahead over buying a new one every 3 years.
     
  11. laza thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2013
    #11
    Thats what I thought too. Prolly its better to get a nice deal now and resell if its not comfortable any more. Or I could just let my parents have it.

    BUT: if I choose a 8gigs machine than use it for 2 years up than every 200$ comp will have 8gigs so my 2k$ mbp will sell for 200$ish. :S
     
  12. AlecMyrddyn macrumors 6502

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    Dec 5, 2008
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    Southern Maine
    #12
    Any insurance is always a gamble. You pay something now in hopes that something will break that would have cost more than the insurance.

    What happens if 1.1-2.9 years in you are happy with the performance, but end up with needing $700 logic board repair? What can you sell the system for? The cost of a refurb or used system with the same specs minus what you can get for your busted computer is probably going to be more than AppleCare would have cost, right?

    But if your computer doesn't break within the first 3 years, of course you saved money!
     
  13. laza thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2013
    #13
    You know, Ive been building PCs since my childhood out of countless parts, also had 2 notebooks. I didn't have problem's with hardware failures...maybe once it was a 50$ motherboard and I bould another for like 35$; same performance (student budget).

    I think that now I shouldn't be afraid of hardware failure when Im about to spend a fortune on one of the most sofisticated hardware IP up to date.

    ----------

    Although I like the idea of a 16gigs 13" +AppleCare, not sure if I want to pay up for it.
     
  14. flux73 macrumors 65816

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    May 29, 2009
    #14
    Yes, but it's sickness I'm happy to have. As long as my income can support it. Better than being addicted to sports cars right? :D
     
  15. Beau10 macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 6, 2008
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    Downtown San Diego
    #15
    When it comes to consumer electronics, insurance is always a loss.

    If you owned just one computer and that lasted you a lifetime, then it would be a thing. But you're going to own dozens and for the ol' markerting pitch "peace of mind", it is irrationally expensive.

    This is not like health or auto insurance where when something catastrophic occurs, it is actually a catastrophy. $700 every now and then isn't going to kill you or bankrupt you, and to assume that cost over paying for an extended warranty for every computer you ever purchase is cheap.
     
  16. surroundfan macrumors 6502

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    Nov 22, 2005
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #16
    Indeed. You only should buy insurance for catastrophic loss. If you can afford a repair, you should go down that route. After all, AppleCare is hugely profitable for Apple, suggesting that on average, the cost of repairs on the laptop in years 2 and 3 will be considerably less than the cost of the AppleCare (it makes sense, because failures tend to follow a 'bathtub' model: lots early on and lots late in life, but not much in between).

    But that's enough off-topic stuff:

    With Mavericks' vastly improved memory management, I'm no longer sure that people who are not power users need to spec their computers to 16GB. I have 8GB in my rMBP and rarely push the memory 'pressure' anywhere near high. But the OP looks like a power user and should get it.
     
  17. vpro macrumors 65816

    vpro

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  18. fskywalker macrumors 65816

    fskywalker

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    Nov 6, 2009
    #18
    16GB RAM here, no regrets; better safe than sorry
     
  19. Jonytheblue macrumors member

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    Nov 25, 2013
  20. am2am macrumors member

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    Oct 15, 2011
    #20
    if you plan to use Apertune with raw - 16GB is a must.
    With 16GB memory, after adjusting 30+ pictures (RAW 21mpix) I have SSD swap around 3GB
     
  21. fskywalker macrumors 65816

    fskywalker

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    Nov 6, 2009
  22. mac8867 macrumors 6502

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    Apr 5, 2010
    Location:
    Saint Augustine, FL
    #22
    You would also need the 16GB of Ram if you intend on running several virtual machines. That is specifically the reason I upgraded.
     

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