15 or 17 inch best for logo design

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by wwe2008, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. wwe2008 macrumors 6502

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    Mar 10, 2008
    #1
    What MacBook pro is better for logo design I will max out both but its the screen resolution vs lightness etc. What's better?
     
  2. Nichod macrumors regular

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    Oct 9, 2007
    #2
    I'd honestly recommend a 15" and then get an additional 19-22" LCD. Simply because it would greatly expand your workspace. My workspace is a 20" widescreen in front of me..macbook to the side with itunes on display playing music and a Apple keyboard with intuos 3.
     
  3. iJesus macrumors 6502a

    iJesus

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    #3
    Or if you really need an all in one MBP,
    get a 17" High resolution

    =)

    But, I am liking the idea of an external display.
     
  4. wwe2008 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #4
    what program is best for logo design I'm only just starting
     
  5. iJesus macrumors 6502a

    iJesus

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    #5
    I've never done logo design, but I can say that DrawIt is pretty fun to use. Probably not the best program for a pro, but it's enough for me. Maybe photoshop?
     
  6. munckee macrumors 65816

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    Oct 27, 2005
    #6
    :confused: If you're not sure of what program to use, you may not be best served rushing out to buy a 15/17" MBP. Try it out on whatever you have handy first.

    Or, if you really need a new machine, a macbook will serve you just fine for vector based logo design.
     
  7. iJesus macrumors 6502a

    iJesus

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    #7
    You're right mate.

    MB + External Display.
    (MBP's are really pretty though =P)
     
  8. chaosbunny macrumors 68000

    chaosbunny

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    #8
    Definitely NOT Photoshop! Use Illustrator! ;)

    Imo 15" is enough for on the go work, and since you can buy a nice 20-22" monitor for the money you saved (or even 24" if you go with the low end mbp, which I'd recomend since CS3 makes no use of the additional vram and the processor speed difference is neglectible) for home use, it's the better choice I'd say.
     
  9. ::Lisa:: macrumors 6502a

    ::Lisa::

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    #9
    If I had to choose between the two you mentioned, I'd definitely go for the larger 17".
     
  10. mgsarch macrumors regular

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    Jan 19, 2008
    #10
    hands down. I have the 15" and a 24" LCD, 15" is useless for any sort of layout work. If you're just starting with logo's you'll probably transcend soon.

    Illustrator is the only app I would use. I've tried all competition. (that I know of.) Illustrator is just a solid program once you learn how to use it. You will not be able to just pick it up and start drawing. It's worth every second to learn through the tutorials and docs. Use KnowHow. The others are fine but they dont offer nearly as complete a package and if you are a hand sketcher the live trace in illy is so nice.

    It's not just a matter of preference, it's efficiency.

    Depending on your capacity I would go so far to say the MBP (mine : 2.33 3gb ram x1900 256mb) is not a good choice for a serious designer. The hard drive is tiny and very slow. I had to attach 3 external drives which presents a whole new set of problems.

    The performance in CS3 is slowwwwwww. Having to wait for the app to load is annoying but when working the slowdown is unacceptable (for me).

    If you're like me and begin to seriously use 3d apps (maya/modo) things start to get REALLY choppy.

    If you don't need a laptop, get a mac pro.

    If you have extra cash, get a Mac Pro and an Air for travel.

    I love my MBP except for the fact it can't do what I need it to do. :)

    (ps. I bought a mac pro and couldn't behappier.)

    hope my mistakes help you do better than I did!! :rolleyes:
     
  11. chaosbunny macrumors 68000

    chaosbunny

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    #11
    How can a mbp be too slow? I can understand it with maya etc. but not with the CS3 suite.
     
  12. Aea macrumors 6502a

    Aea

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    #12
    I think what he means is that Hard Drive is going to be the performance bottle neck for the MBP systems ;)
     
  13. thegoldenmackid macrumors 604

    thegoldenmackid

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  14. mgsarch macrumors regular

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    Jan 19, 2008
    #14
    Exactly. The 5400 RPM drive is just WAY to slow for a designer and the size basically makes it impossible to be without external drives.

    Trust me, CS3 will crawl if you have inDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, Bridge, Aperture, Maya, Safari, and ITunes all running. Everytime you switch apps you'll watch a nice stutter sequence. Things crash regularly (3-4GB is just not enough. I used to watch my memory usage, never enough resources. This resulted in CS3 becoming very unstable. I blamed adobe and felt furious that such an expensive set of applications would be released at such an unstable point in development. My Mac Pro is proof enough for me that it was my MBP all along.

    The 7200 RPM drive was better but I'm realizing now that I have my Mac Pro the MBP is just not equipped for intensive design productivity. I realize that list of apps is pretty insane but the alternative is to drastically reduce workflow. I convinced myself for a year and a half that a MBP is capable of replacing a desktop- I'm looking back now and wishing I had just accepted the reality that my work can't be done on a laptop no matter how much I love portability. It's very important to evaluate your tasks and the actual purpose of the tool you purchase. i wanted an MBP but I needed an MP.

    The MBP is an awesome computer. It's beautiful and a pleasure to use.

    It's not a replacement for a workstation and will put you in your place quickly if you try to make it one.
     
  15. xparaparafreakx macrumors 65816

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    Jul 29, 2005
    #15
    15" or 17" with a 24" and make sure you correct the colors on both monitors.

    7200 RPM hard drive and/or Firewire 800 hard drive that is 7200rpm.

    Illustrator and maybe Indesign CS 3.

    A nice tablet also.
     
  16. boazjoe macrumors member

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    Feb 13, 2008
    #16
    What is wrong with an imac? Less expensive than a mbp. Large screen.

    Just wondering.
     
  17. digitalnicotine macrumors 65816

    digitalnicotine

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    #17
    I have a 17" MBP 2.33 GHZ with 4 gigs matched pairs ram installed (get 3.3GB performance wise). I have it connected to a 22" monitor, and am able to use Illustrator for logo design quite nicely, tyvm. I'm also using CS3, but have Tiger installed, and find it does not lag at all, and is quite efficient. BTW, I have 7200RPM drive installed, and an external G-tech fw 800. The current MBP would actually meet and exceed your needs for logo design.

    I think the 15" MBP would be fine only if you intend to attach and external monitor. You could probably get by with a 22" for logos. I agree that Illustrator CS3 is the program of choice, and if you have long term goals as a logo designer, you might as well start with an industry standard program, rather than play around with the toys.

    I don't have a MB, so I'm not sure if you could get by with one, but I suspect you could if you use a 22" external monitor. Again, if this is a long term interest, you will have to weigh your finances against your future, and decide if you want to get the less powerful laptop now, or go for the one that will be there for you when you grow. Either way, it's probable that you'll be upgrading as you grow anyway, so just some things to consider.

    Since you haven't mentioned going into heavy 3d rendering, or large print/photo editing work, I think the above will suit your needs with logos. BTW, a 24" iMac would also do a bang up job for logo designing. Good luck to you. :)
     
  18. wwe2008 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Mar 10, 2008
    #18
    I'm deciding between a 17 inch mbp 2.6 GHz glossy hi res display or a 15 inch mbp 2.6 GHz with a glossy display.
    Which one do you recomend?
     
  19. digitalnicotine macrumors 65816

    digitalnicotine

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    #19
    I'd get the 15" and use the money saved towards an external monitor. Good luck. :)
     
  20. wwe2008 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #20
    I've decided on a 15 inch mbp 2.6GHz 2GB (upgrade myself) glossy screen 200GB HDD 7200rpm iWork and a 23 inch HD display
    getting other software in 2 weeks!
     
  21. wwe2008 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Mar 10, 2008
    #21
    is a 20 inch acd okay? I mean for logos etc? Thanks
     
  22. digitalnicotine macrumors 65816

    digitalnicotine

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    #22
    You should do okay with a 20" monitor for logo design, yes. :) Remember, for years, 20" was as big as monitors were, and a ton of logos were successfully designed using them. :)
     
  23. mrchainsaw5757 macrumors regular

    mrchainsaw5757

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    Sep 6, 2006
    #23
    I do freelance design including many many logos. And i am fine with my 15" matte screen with an external 20". Works great. For vector logos Illustrator is best hands down. But photoshop works well for applying different effects and such. I use both simultaneously.
     
  24. mrchainsaw5757 macrumors regular

    mrchainsaw5757

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    #24
    Dont get the glossy if your going into graphic design.
     
  25. wwe2008 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #25
    Why?
     

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