16" MBP Color Calibration Conclusion & Profile Sharing

codemania

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 20, 2019
19
9
【Conclusion】
I've got a spider X for calibration, and below is the conclusion:
1. Original color temp of Samsung screen(Using default ColorLcd, in which color temp is 6500k, gamma is 2.2, below the same) is around 7459k. This means the color temp of the Samsung screen is cold-prone, and the real color temp is about 950 higher than the literal value.

* ** *2019-12-24* ** *6.36.30.png


2.Original color temp of LG screen(Using default ColorLcd, in which color temp is 6500k, gamma is 2.2, below the same) is around 6942k. This means the color temp of the LG screen is ALSO cold-prone!!! And the real color temp is about 450 higher than the literal value.

* ** *2019-12-24* ** *6.37.28.png


3.So the conclusion is:
A) All Mac screens are cold-prone than the standard color temp in fact. The real standard 6500k/2.2 gama screen should just be warmer/yellower than we supposed!
B) Samsung is more cold-prone(950k higher), and LG is less cold-prone(450 higher).

【Work Around】
And what should we do with this fact?
A) I've got the 6500k/2.2 calibration for both screens, which made these two screens almost as warm/yellow as the same. Theoretically, you should apply this calibration file and try to adapted this warm/yellow screen and accept it as the standard.
Below are the calibration files, and these two are still a little different, the 1st is colder, perhaps because I forgot to turn off auto-brightness while calibrating.
16‘’ Spider X Calibration.zip


B) If you don't want to change your habit, you can choose to adjust the color temp of your LG screen 500 higher around, this can make the two screens look the same, even in one photo taken by an iPhone.
Below is what it looks like when both set to the REAL same color temp, and MAXIMUM brightness.
E129FE67-1CF9-43EA-89F9-8E015B05DD22_1_105_c.jpeg


C) Now I choose to just accept the LG screen, after days of usage, I already adapted to it and will not feel it yellow without comparing with my old 15''. And if u adjust the Samsung screen to standard, it's even yellower than the LG screen in default mode, so whatever, they are also inaccurate, in fact the LG is even BETTER, it's closer to the standard.


【Background Story】
Any body already calibrated the screen "LP160WT1-SJA1" could u kindly share the calibration file in the forum?

Color LCD
LP160WT1-SJA1
DCN9462004BLP0JAW

Background:
My 16" MacBook Pro got an LG screen as above, which turned to have obvious warm/yellow color temperature compared with the exhibition model in Apple Store. I've go to genius bar and they admitted this fact and give me a paper confirmation file also, however they said apple has no standard for color temperature and rejected to replace the screen for this reason.

So setting the calibration file is the only work around, and I think all LP160WT1-SJA1 panels would be suitable for 1 calibration file right?

And I am not satisfied with Apple for this, all computers should have a standard, no mention so expensive a computer as this one.

Below is a comparison of my 16"(right) with common one(left, my old 15"), with true tone off, white point setting all the same 6500k.
IMG_5975.jpeg
 

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casperes1996

macrumors 601
Jan 26, 2014
4,372
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Horsens, Denmark
So setting the calibration file is the only work around, and I think all LP160WT1-SJA1 panels would be suitable for 1 calibration file right?
No. You may be able to get "close enough" that way, but each panel that leaves the factory, even with the same model number, will have variations making a single calibration to rule them all impossible. Further more, time and conditions will affect calibration and require different adjustments
 
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Sanpete

macrumors 68020
Nov 17, 2016
2,345
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Utah
I suspect what Apple doesn't have is a standard for initial screen color. If you can't calibrate it so it's accurate, that should be a valid reason for return or repair.

A few people have said the older MBPs were too blue by default, so if that's what you're used to, the 16" might seem off even if it's right. Notebook Check got their 16" to less error than we can perceive by calibration.

Here's Notebook Check's calibration, which at least one person who used it said was pretty close to how his screen arrived. Might be worth a try if you want to avoid calibrating it yourself.

 

codemania

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 20, 2019
19
9
No. You may be able to get "close enough" that way, but each panel that leaves the factory, even with the same model number, will have variations making a single calibration to rule them all impossible. Further more, time and conditions will affect calibration and require different adjustments
Thanks, I see.
So I should accept this color temperature variation and try some calibrations, a returning would be unnecessary.
And it's best to used a colormeter such as spider to calibrate myself if I am serious about the color temp correction.
Oh my ……, it's really unapple, isn't Mac always proud for it's accurate screen. Disappoint with cook, they should do this calibration in the factory and deliver the consumers right ones no matter what brand or batch the panels are.
 

casperes1996

macrumors 601
Jan 26, 2014
4,372
2,209
Horsens, Denmark
So I should accept this color temperature variation and try some calibrations, a returning would be unnecessary.
And it's best to used a colormeter such as spider to calibrate myself if I am serious about the color temp correction.
Oh my ……, it's really unapple, isn't Mac always proud for it's accurate screen. Disappoint with cook, they should do this calibration in the factory and deliver the consumers right ones no matter what brand or batch the panels are.
I mean, if you're dissatisfied, return it while you can.
But also, Sanpete may have a point:

I suspect what Apple doesn't have is a standard for initial screen color. If you can't calibrate it so it's accurate, that should be a valid reason for return or repair.

A few people have said the older MBPs were too blue by default, so if that's what you're used to, the 16" might seem off even if it's right. Notebook Check got their 16" to less error than we can perceive by calibration.

Here's Notebook Check's calibration, which at least one person who used it said was pretty close to how his screen arrived. Might be worth a try if you want to avoid calibrating it yourself.

 

codemania

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 20, 2019
19
9
I suspect what Apple doesn't have is a standard for initial screen color. If you can't calibrate it so it's accurate, that should be a valid reason for return or repair.

A few people have said the older MBPs were too blue by default, so if that's what you're used to, the 16" might seem off even if it's right. Notebook Check got their 16" to less error than we can perceive by calibration.

Here's Notebook Check's calibration, which at least one person who used it said was pretty close to how his screen arrived. Might be worth a try if you want to avoid calibrating it yourself.

Thank you dude, I tried this icc and the screen changed little, perhaps not for my panel's situation, but still thanks very much.
Your arguments are reasonable, it's possible the old 15'' and the exhibition 16'' in shop are too cold, and I was just used to the cold color, I've decided to rent a colormeter to calibrate myself, to make it clear.
 
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codemania

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 20, 2019
19
9
I mean, if you're dissatisfied, return it while you can.
But also, Sanpete may have a point:
Thanks.
Just tried but I bought it from reseller and they reject any returning without "quality problems"😂.
I would rent a colorimeter to see if it's a "quality problems", or it's the right 6500k white and the other machines are too cold, and I was just used to cold tones.
 
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am2am

macrumors regular
Oct 15, 2011
195
80
Thanks.
Just tried but I bought it from reseller and they reject any returning without "quality problems"😂.
I would rent a colormeter to see if it's a "quality problems", or it's the right 6500k white and the other machines are too cold, and I was just used to cold tones.
Please share your experience. What is the outcome of the calibration and how far your screen was corrected compared to factory settings.

I was considering the same (renting/buying colorimeter) but I did it in the past and the calibrated screen surprised me - it was much warmer/washout that I expected ..

I decided I keep mine despite slightly warmer/yellowish tint. I notice it only when comparing with my iPad Pro. In normal use it is not disturbing at all.

Recently I have 3 screens on - MBP16, iPad Pro and external 4k (Benq - supposed to be relatively color-correct, I selected sRGB calibrated profile). I may post a picture later - iPad was slightly on blue-end (someone explained it helps with battery life), Benq was slightly warmer, MBP was somewhere in the middle.
 

codemania

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 20, 2019
19
9
Please share your experience. What is the outcome of the calibration and how far your screen was corrected compared to factory settings.

I was considering the same (renting/buying colorimeter) but I did it in the past and the calibrated screen surprised me - it was much warmer/washout that I expected ..

I decided I keep mine despite slightly warmer/yellowish tint. I notice it only when comparing with my iPad Pro. In normal use it is not disturbing at all.

Recently I have 3 screens on - MBP16, iPad Pro and external 4k (Benq - supposed to be relatively color-correct, I selected sRGB calibrated profile). I may post a picture later - iPad was slightly on blue-end (someone explained it helps with battery life), Benq was slightly warmer, MBP was somewhere in the middle.
Sure, I would sync my progress here.
And I am now studying colorimeters, spider or xrite, which is better,what's the colorimeter you used in the past, and do u have any suggestion about this?
 
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casperes1996

macrumors 601
Jan 26, 2014
4,372
2,209
Horsens, Denmark
Just tried but I bought it from reseller and they reject any returning without "quality problems"😂.
I would rent a colorimeter to see if it's a "quality problems", or it's the right 6500k white and the other machines are too cold, and I was just used to cold tones.
Wow, really? Apple's own policy is no questions asked for I think 14 days, and over where I live, if you have all the original stuff, like box, paperwork, etc. and you haven't ruined the packaging and such, they need to take it back by law I believe.
 

codemania

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 20, 2019
19
9
Wow, really? Apple's own policy is no questions asked for I think 14 days, and over where I live, if you have all the original stuff, like box, paperwork, etc. and you haven't ruined the packaging and such, they need to take it back by law I believe.
Also valid for resellers? Then this reseller is no honest.
I didn't insist cause I also hesitated about whether returning or not.
I don't want to return a machine which is in fact of no problem just due to my innocence about color management .
Now I think I can decide after a spider X calibration and days of usage.
I will state it later.
 

Andropov

macrumors regular
May 3, 2012
217
42
Spain
It seems like the reseller is the problem here. Either return the MacBook Pro (you should be allowed to by law in the 14-day return period) or call Apple directly to have your screen replaced/calibrated. I really doubt Apple will refuse since a bad color calibration makes the screen truly unusable for a lot of pros (photographers like me for instance) and they know it.
 

codemania

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 20, 2019
19
9
I'm not an expert but most are in the agreement xrite is much better
I've got a spider X for calibration, and below is the conclusion:
1. Original color temp of Samsung screen(Using default ColorLcd, in which color temp is 6500k, gamma is 2.2, below the same) is around 7459k. This means the color temp of the Samsung screen is cold-prone, and the real color temp is about 950 higher than the literal value.
* ** *2019-12-24* ** *6.36.30.png

2.Original color temp of LG screen(Using default ColorLcd, in which color temp is 6500k, gamma is 2.2, below the same) is around 6942k. This means the color temp of the LG screen is ALSO cold-prone!!! And the real color temp is about 450 higher than the literal value.
* ** *2019-12-24* ** *6.37.28.png

3.So the conclusion is:
A) All Mac screens are cold-prone than the standard color temp in fact. The real standard 6500k/2.2 gama screen should just be warmer/yellower than we supposed!
B) Samsung is more cold-prone(950k higher), and LG is less cold-prone(450 higher).

4.And what should we do with this fact?
A) I've got the 6500k/2.2 calibration for both screens, which made these two screens almost as warm/yellow as the same. Theoretically, you should apply this calibration file and try to adapted this warm/yellow screen and accept it as the standard.
B) If you don't want to change your habit, you can choose to adjust the color temp of your LG screen 500 higher around, this can make the two screens look the same, even in one photo taken by an iPhone.
C) Now I choose to just accept the LG screen, after days of usage, I already adapted to it and will not feel it yellow without comparing with my old 15''. And if u adjust the Samsung screen to standard, it's even yellower than the LG screen in default mode, so whatever, they are also inaccurate, in fact the LG is even BETTER, it's closer to the standard.
 
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codemania

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 20, 2019
19
9
It seems like the reseller is the problem here. Either return the MacBook Pro (you should be allowed to by law in the 14-day return period) or call Apple directly to have your screen replaced/calibrated. I really doubt Apple will refuse since a bad color calibration makes the screen truly unusable for a lot of pros (photographers like me for instance) and they know it.
I went to the genius bar and they say they have no standard, they have no spier or xrite, and they reject to calibrate or tell any more knowledge about color temp, and they just offered me a proof file which admitting my screen is yellower than the exhibition models. This is my experience in China, maybe your server are better in America. I am considering a complain for Apple about this non-expert service process.

Now I know this screen of mine is not more inaccurate than the exhibition model.
And another fact: all MBP screens are inaccurate, they didn't calibrate it in the factory at all.
If you place 3 or more MBPs in one line and checked carefully you will find them all different in color temp.
 

codemania

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 20, 2019
19
9
Mine is also orange. Immediately noticeable and unacceptable for an Apple display.
So how did you deal with it?
You can adjust it in "Preference > Display > Color > Calibrate" and set the white point to 7000-7200 and then see if it meets your habit.
 

MacBookGamer

macrumors member
Nov 15, 2019
85
55
So how did you deal with it?
You can adjust it in "Preference > Display > Color > Calibrate" and set the white point to 7000-7200 and then see if it meets your habit.
That just makes it blue, and the brightness is still dim.
 

matram

macrumors 6502
Sep 18, 2011
316
133
Sweden
That just makes it blue, and the brightness is still dim.
6500K is normal. Higher values give blue tint, lower values yellow tint. @codemania is just saying, adjust to your preference by changing color temperature.

The brightness is not dim. Anyhow you color calibrate at 120 nits, which is about half brightness on the slider and one quarter of the maximum display brightness.
 

MacBookGamer

macrumors member
Nov 15, 2019
85
55
6500K is normal. Higher values give blue tint, lower values yellow tint. @codemania is just saying, adjust to your preference by changing color temperature.

The brightness is not dim. Anyhow you color calibrate at 120 nits, which is about half brightness on the slider and one quarter of the maximum display brightness.
It’s noticeably dimmer than my 13”.
 

matram

macrumors 6502
Sep 18, 2011
316
133
Sweden
I and other peeople with professional calibration equipment has measured the MAXIMUM brightness and found it to be close to spec assuming you switch of Auto Brightness.

Any perceived brightness at normal operating range 50 - 75% is a result of your screen calibration.

normal calibrations are for 100 - 120 nits.

What is you use case that requires 500 nits brightness?
 
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am2am

macrumors regular
Oct 15, 2011
195
80
I've got a spider X for calibration, and below is the conclusion:
1. Original color temp of Samsung screen(Using default ColorLcd, in which color temp is 6500k, gamma is 2.2, below the same) is around 7459k. This means the color temp of the Samsung screen is cold-prone, and the real color temp is about 950 higher than the literal value.
View attachment 884684
2.Original color temp of LG screen(Using default ColorLcd, in which color temp is 6500k, gamma is 2.2, below the same) is around 6942k. This means the color temp of the LG screen is ALSO cold-prone!!! And the real color temp is about 450 higher than the literal value.
View attachment 884685
3.So the conclusion is:
A) All Mac screens are cold-prone than the standard color temp in fact. The real standard 6500k/2.2 gama screen should just be warmer/yellower than we supposed!
B) Samsung is more cold-prone(950k higher), and LG is less cold-prone(450 higher).

4.And what should we do with this fact?
A) I've got the 6500k/2.2 calibration for both screens, which made these two screens almost as warm/yellow as the same. Theoretically, you should apply this calibration file and try to adapted this warm/yellow screen and accept it as the standard.
B) If you don't want to change your habit, you can choose to adjust the color temp of your LG screen 500 higher around, this can make the two screens look the same, even in one photo taken by an iPhone.
C) Now I choose to just accept the LG screen, after days of usage, I already adapted to it and will not feel it yellow without comparing with my old 15''. And if u adjust the Samsung screen to standard, it's even yellower than the LG screen in default mode, so whatever, they are also inaccurate, in fact the LG is even BETTER, it's closer to the standard.
Thanks for sharing.
This is exactly the conclusion I have - new MBP16 are CLOSER to correctly calibrated 6500K white point.
I get used to it and now when I switch to something else it is too blueish for me..
I have external benq at home pre-calibrated for multiple use - when select sRGB it is slightly warmer than my MBP16.

Can you share your calibrated .icc file?
 

codemania

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 20, 2019
19
9
Thanks for sharing.
This is exactly the conclusion I have - new MBP16 are CLOSER to correctly calibrated 6500K white point.
I get used to it and now when I switch to something else it is too blueish for me..
I have external benq at home pre-calibrated for multiple use - when select sRGB it is slightly warmer than my MBP16.

Can you share your calibrated .icc file?
Sure, I've shared it in the main thread.
 

am2am

macrumors regular
Oct 15, 2011
195
80
Sure, I've shared it in the main thread.
Thanks again.
Your second profile (x 3) is very similar to notebookcheck.net. Even it is not calibrated to my screen I see similar effect you described - both are slightly warmer than MBP16 default - which I really get used to - happy with what I have.
There is still an error with True Tone - when I select one of your profiles sometimes screen is very dark/contrasty. It disappear as soon as I disable True Tone.