Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

zshane1125

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jul 16, 2018
130
148
Anyone notices that the True Tone is super warm and yellowish compared to the previous models? I don't like my screen to be warm at all times, and it seems like this True Tone featured on the 16" is not working properly because even if my environment has a cool tone, it's still very warm.

Anyway to fix this?
 

konqerror

macrumors 68020
Dec 31, 2013
2,298
3,693
it seems like this True Tone featured on the 16" is not working properly because even if my environment has a cool tone, it's still very warm.

Get a high quality piece of printer paper, the color temperature should match with True Tone.

Most computer users have never seen a proper calibration and immediately think it's too warm. The "correct" non-True Tone calibration is the same as sunlight (D65). Yet, the majority of screens, including Apple's, are set even more blue than they should (~6800 K) in order to appear brighter on the salesroom floor.

When True Tone kicks in and properly matches the 2700 K light bulbs people use at home or the 4000 K tubes at work, people complain.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DanMan619
Comment

casperes1996

macrumors 603
Jan 26, 2014
5,985
3,857
Horsens, Denmark
I have seen bugs where if u so much as touch the night shift setting, it gets a mind of its own and can turn on (or refuse to turn off) somewhat randomly.

I've never had this myself, but fair enough
[automerge]1576106696[/automerge]
Most computer users have never seen a proper calibration and immediately think it's too warm. The "correct" non-True Tone calibration is the same as sunlight (D65). This is colder than even a daylight lightbulb (5000 K). Yet, the majority of screens, including Apple's, are set even more blue than they should (~6800 K) in order to appear brighter on the salesroom floor.

Correct calibration depends on what standard you're targeting. In most cases that's 65k, yes, but in some cases it's 50k. Apple's displays are usually pretty close to 65k though. But yes they are more likely to overshoot than undershoot out of the box
 
Comment

zshane1125

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jul 16, 2018
130
148
Get a high quality piece of printer paper, the color temperature should match with True Tone.

Most computer users have never seen a proper calibration and immediately think it's too warm. The "correct" non-True Tone calibration is the same as sunlight (D65). Yet, the majority of screens, including Apple's, are set even more blue than they should (~6800 K) in order to appear brighter on the salesroom floor.

When True Tone kicks in and properly matches the 2700 K light bulbs people use at home or the 4000 K tubes at work, people complain.

Way warmer than the paper.
 
Comment

MacMaze

macrumors newbie
Dec 11, 2019
28
43
Did you try disabling true tone and automatic adjustment of the brightness? If it's still yellow this might be an issue with the new panels they are using. My MBP 16 screen is also more yellow compared to a 2010 MBPr, iPhone 7 and iPad mini 4. With True Tone enabled it becomes very warm/yellow, definitely not the same as printer paper.
 
Comment

zshane1125

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jul 16, 2018
130
148
Did you try disabling true tone and automatic adjustment of the brightness? If it's still yellow this might be an issue with the new panels they are using. My MBP 16 screen is also more yellow compared to a 2010 MBPr, iPhone 7 and iPad mini 4. With True Tone enabled it becomes very warm/yellow, definitely not the same as printer paper.

Yes, it goes back to normal. Only when true tone is turned on, the screen goes very yellowish.
 
Comment
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.