1Password from the App Store or Website?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Spinit14, Oct 19, 2014.

  1. Spinit14 macrumors member

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    Apr 12, 2014
    #1
    I'm a fairly new Mac user coming from Windows, I'm looking into purchasing 1Password for my new rMBP, when I went into the app store today and attempted to download, it gives me the message that it cannot be installed because I do not have OSX 10.10. I have not updated to the latest version that just came out. What is the difference in purchasing this on the app store compared to the web site? Advantages and disadvantages of both?
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #2
    See what Agilebits the maker of 1Password has to say on this

    Kb article
     
  3. Spinit14 thread starter macrumors member

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    Apr 12, 2014
    #3
    So right now because I don't have the latest Mac OSX I can't download the App Store version? Is this correct?
     
  4. BasicGreatGuy, Oct 19, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014

    BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #4
    If you want to be able to sync 1Password with iCloud, you need to purchase from the MAS, as the Agile Bits web version does not offer iCloud syncing, due to Apple restrictions.

    I highly recommend 1Password. It works great in Yosemite.

    Edited to add: 1Password 5 can only run on OS X 10.10 regardless of where you purchase it.

    "Because of the changes to iCloud, 1Password 5 can only run on iOS 8 devices and Macs running OS X 10.10 (Yosemite). Devices running iOS 7 and Macs running OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) will need to be upgraded to the newer operating systems in order to use 1Password 5 and the new iCloud sync."

    https://guides.agilebits.com/1password-ios-kb/4/en/topic/cloudkit-faq

    If you have any questions, you can contact Kyle (from Agile Bits). He posts here on a regular basis. He will be able to better answer any questions or concerns you may have.

    http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=20091588&postcount=12
     
  5. Spinit14 thread starter macrumors member

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    Apr 12, 2014
    #5
    Thanks for the info. Good stuff. So I guess I need to upgrade to OSX Yosemite. What is the process for doing this... is it as easy as upgrading in MAS?
     
  6. BasicGreatGuy, Oct 19, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2014

    BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #6
    *** Upgrading to Yosemite is a fairly simple process. The following is for anyone that wishes to do a clean install of Yosemite. If you want to upgrade over Mavericks, download the Yosemite file from the MAS. It downloads to the Applications folder. When it is finished, double click it and it will start the upgrade process.

    1) Backup your computer using Time Machine, Clear Copy Cloner, or SuperDuper

    2) Download Yosemite from the MAS

    3) The file downloads to your applications folder. Once it finishes, it will want to start the install process. Exit out of the install

    4) Make a USB Yosemite installer. You need a 8 GB USB drive and about 20 minutes. The directions are very easy and can be found here.

    5) Once you have the USB installer made, restart your computer and hold down the Command and R button at the same time. Once you see the progress bar start, you can release.

    6) Your system will boot into Disk Utility. You want to focus on the bottom option on the screen, because you want to erase your HDD. Erase your HDD and exit out of Disk Utility.

    7) Reboot your machine while holding down the option button. The screen that follows will show your Macintosh HD and your newly created Yosemite USB installer options. Click on the Yosemite option. This will start the installation process.

    8) During the Yosemite installation, the option to enable FileVault is already checked by default. If you don't want to use FileVault, make sure you uncheck that box.

    ** You don't have to create a USB installer if you want to upgrade over Mavericks. You can simply download the Yosemite installer as noted before, and then double click it in the Applications folder. That will start the upgrade process. If something goes awry during the install, you will have to download the Yosemite file again, as it gets deleted during install. The method I outlined if for anyone that wishes to do a clean install of the OS.
     
  7. Spinit14 thread starter macrumors member

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    Apr 12, 2014
    #7
    Thank you very much for the detailed response. I guess my question is as a fairly new MAC user why should I do a "clean" install over the option of just downloading it from the store and upgrading over Mavericks which is what came on my rMBP.
     
  8. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #8
    If your Mac has been running well, you don't have to do a clean install. Apple doesn't state such either. They make the program to be installed by the typical user on top of the current OS. Many people do just that. Most of the time, there is no problem installing that way. I prefer doing a fresh install of a new OS. I was explaining both methods to you, so that you can decide which route you wish to take.

    If you are very new to Macs, (or computers in general) you can do the simple upgrade. If you do, go ahead and make the USB installer first. That way, if you ever want or need to do a clean install of Yosemite, you will already have the USB and won't have to worry about downloading from the MAS again etc.
     
  9. Spinit14 thread starter macrumors member

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    Apr 12, 2014
    #9
    Thank you very much for the much appreciated help.

    ----------

    If I do the "simple" upgrade, and decide that OSX Yosemite isn't for me, Can I switch back to Mavericks?
     
  10. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #10
    You can switch back to Mavericks provided you have downloaded it before from the MAS or (at the very least) have a Time Machine backup with Mavericks. If you did download Mavericks previously, you can do so again, and go through the same process I have talked of.

    Glad to help out. I have been given a lot of help here by people directly, as well as just reading the forums. I try to return the favor as much as I can.

    I do hope you like Yosemite, because 1Password 5 is a great program.
     
  11. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2013
    #11
    BGGuy - thanks for the clean install summary; good job making it concise. I agree with your assessment of 1Password.

    To add to your comments on Mavericks and Yosemite installations, you can keep a "permanent" copy of the "installer" apps locally on your Mac so that you can re-install the desired version of OS X whenever you need, without re-downloading these large files.

    When you install Mavericks or Yosemite through iTunes or App Store, the large installer file is first downloaded into your Applications folder. The file is named "Install OS X Mavericks.app" or "Install OS X Yosemite.app". This installer file will be deleted at the end of the installation process. To save a local copy of this file, simply interrupt the process after the download (but before actual installation - there will be a pause at which you have to click a "continue" button) and copy-and-paste this file to another folder in your Mac. If you ever need to re-install Mavericks (or Yosemite), then just copy the installer program back into the applications folder and launch the installer program again - no need to re-download.
     
  12. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #12
    Thank you, Infantry, for the compliment and clarification. You are right in what you said. I thought about that after I had made the post. Thanks for elaborating on that as well. Hopefully, what has been talked about here will help others.

    Hopefully, the OP can get 1Password installed. Then, he will be wondering how he did without for so long. :cool:
     
  13. Spinit14 thread starter macrumors member

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    Apr 12, 2014
    #13
    That is the plan BasicGreatGuy

    ----------

    Call me a real Noob, but I have had this PC since late June and have not did a time machine backup. When I go into time machine backup it says the only way to save stuff is in another time capsule which I do not currently have. I'm assuming in order to save a backup I need to purchase another hard drive to backup things. Any suggestions?
     
  14. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2013
    #14
    suggestion for backup hard drive

    To Spinit14 --
    I have used "portable" external hard drives for Time Machine backups. These connect to one of the USB ports in your Mac. Power is provided by the USB port, so there is no need for an extra power cable.

    Here is one example (Western Digital "Passport"):
    http://www.wdc.com/en/products/products.aspx?id=910
    This particular model is formatted for the Mac.

    The standard version (formatted for Windows) can be used by simply using the built-in OS X "Disk Utility" program to format the drive in the Mac format. The format you want is "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)". For full instructions, do a Google search; this is easy to do.

    I have found that the standard, windows versions of these WD Passport drives (and competing drives from Seagate and other brands) are widely available in local stores and are less expensive than the pre-formatted "Mac" version. Same drive, just different format. I have bought several of these at Costco; they work very well and are inexpensive. Here is the one I have, $70 at Costco:
    http://www.costco.com/.product.1000...geHorizontalTop|PersonalizedClickCPInCategory

    Make sure to get a USB 3 version - much faster than the older USB 2 standard, if your Mac supports it.

    You mentioned "Time Capsule". Don't confuse this with "Time Machine". Time Machine is the Mac's built-in backup program that runs automatically. "Time Capsule" is Apple's router/wi-fi/hard drive backup device. This is a nice device, but you don't need it and it's expensive. My suggestion is to connect the portable hard drive mentioned above for about $70 to $100 or so, depending on the capacity you need. 1 TB should be fine for Time Machine backup and will cost much less than $100.
     
  15. AGKyle macrumors 6502

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    Jun 10, 2012
    #15
    Everyone else has been very helpful. I will narrow it down quickly though:

    1) If you want to sync to iCloud you need to upgrade to Yosemite to buy 1Password 5 for Mac (it's Yosemite only)

    That's the only way you will ever sync to iCloud.

    2) If iCloud does not matter to you then you can buy from our website which will include Dropbox and Wifi sync. No iCloud sync can take place from our website version going forward. So if you ever want to sync via iCloud you'll need to go with #1.

    If you plan to upgrade to Yosemite, I strongly encourage you make backups of all important data. We don't really provide support for this so you'll want to ask questions here on the forum for the best way to handle that. But not making backups prior to upgrading an OS is a bad idea.
     
  16. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2013
    #16
    One of the positive qualities of 1Password is that there is actual support provided. On the Agilebits website there are support forums that are monitored by Agilebits personnel. And I have seen several helpful forum posts, such as the one by Kyle from Agilebits above.

    Here are some more thoughts on the MAS-vs-direct from developer purchase decision:

    Purchase of Mac apps directly from the developer allows you to take advantage of free or reduced-price version upgrades that usually are not available through the Mac App Store. There are certain "important" apps (1Password, TextExapnder, PDF Pen, etc.) for which free or reduced-price upgrades are desirable. Apple's App Store policies may not allow this, so it makes sense to buy these types of apps directly from the vendor. These apps (that I think of as "important" or "significant" productivity apps) tend to sold "paid app" model rather than the "freemium" model.

    There are disadvantages, however by not buying apps through the MAS. For one thing, MAS purchases are automatically stored for you in your iTunes/MAS account. When you upgrade to Apple's newest OS, your MAS-purchased apps are automatically restored. From developer-purchased apps, you need to re-install these yourself.

    Finally, MAS-purchased apps may have certain features that are not available in developer-purchased apps. Kyle from Agilebits explained this well. Apple will allow only MAS-purchased apps to access iCloud.

    For me, the developer-purchased 1Password app for the Mac is the more desirable choice. I have 1Password installed on 2 computers, soon to be 3, purchased using Agilebits' "family" license (not allowed on the MAS). The cost is not trivial, and I want to get upgrades to new versions when available, hopefully at reduced prices that would not be allowed through the MAS. And I actually prefer to sync through Dropbox for two reasons: 1) iCloud has a history of periodic problems, and 2) Dropbox sync allows platform-independent sync. If I ever want to sync to an Android device or to a Windows PC, there is no problem. Can't do that through iCloud. I think that it's important remain independent from specific platforms whenever possible.
     
  17. Spinit14 thread starter macrumors member

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    Apr 12, 2014
    #17
    Thank you for the info InfantryTrophy. I need to make a backup of this rMBP and I will be looking at my local stores to locate an external HD.

    ----------

    Thanks for the info AGKyle. I'm currently looking to backup my data before downloading Yosemite.

    ----------

    Thank for the the post. When you mention syncing through dropbox rather than iCloud what information is being "synced" the passwords?
     
  18. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2013
    #18
    Yes, the passwords plus anything else you choose to put in the "vault".

    The "vault" is file that is synced; this is the encrypted and password-protected file that contains your sensitive information - passwords, login names, credit card data, passports, driver's license, memberships, rewards program info, secure notes that you can type in with attachments, and more. The vault is stored locally on your computer. Although not required, you can also sync this vault file to other devices - iPad, smart phone and other computers using any of 3 sync choices: iCloud, Dropbox or Wi-Fi.

    Your vault is not stored in Agilebits' servers; it's stored locally. 1PW has a command to back up your vault locally also. Plus, most users will sync the vault to other devices so there are redundant backups, all synced with current information, stored on the other devices.

    Access to the vault is only through your secure password - you have to remember only this one password. The same password is used for the synced vault on your other devices.

    Some users are reluctant to use a "cloud-based" service or to store sensitive information "in the cloud". You don't have to do that with 1PW. As explained above, your information is stored locally. You can sync this secure file to your other devices "through the cloud" if you want, but your file is not stored by Agilebits. If you don't want to use "cloud" sync (Dropbox or iCloud), you can sync to your devices using wi-fi.
     
  19. Spinit14 thread starter macrumors member

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    Apr 12, 2014
    #19
    I went a purchased a WD My Passport 1TB external HD at the store tonight. I just went through the disk utility program and changed it to the proper format.

    I'm currently doing my first time machine backup. Now my questions is before I download and attempt to install OSX Yosemite do I need to also need to backup my documents folders, music folder, pictures folder, etc. on a separate usb stick or HD? Or are all of these included in the time machine backup?
     
  20. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #20
    Included in the Time Machine backup.
     
  21. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    #21
    These are all included in the TM backup.

    Of course, it would not hurt at all for you to do some simple manual redundant backups to an extra HD or USB stick - all of your documents folder, export all pictures from iPhoto, etc. It costs nothing but your time.

    I have taken these precautions - TM backup, extra manual backup of Documents & pictures and cloud backup (Backblaze). Fortunately, I have never needed the backups. I have updated from Snow Leopard to Lion to Mountain Lion to Mavericks to Yosemite with no problems.

    If you don't mind a bit of "geeky" detail -- You can use your new WD Passport disk drive that now contains your TM backups for some temporary "extra backup" storage space. Temporary, as explained below.

    When TM does its hourly backups, it creates, then updates, a big file on your external drive. This file is named "backups.backupd". Unless your Mac hard drive is very full, this backup file won't fill up your 1TB external drive. You can use the extra space to copy over some of your files for which you want to manually back up - documents, pictures, etc. Just go to the finder and do a "file-get info" and get an idea of how much space you have vs. how large your data folders that want to back up are.

    Here's the geeky part -- your TM backup files will grow in size over time. Unless you have made extra partitions in the external drive, the TM backups could over-write your manually-saved files on that drive. That's why I say that these backups are "temporary".

    Of course, you could always attach another external hard drive or USB stick - you have 4 USB ports to play with.

    Don't fret too much. Just wait until your first TM backup finishes, make whatever manual backups you want and update to Yosemite. It worked fine in my 2009 iMac (as have previous updates to Lion, Mountain Lion and Mavericks). Apple does a pretty good job with these updates.
     
  22. Spinit14 thread starter macrumors member

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    #22
    Thanks for the info infantry trophy. I guess now my decision after I finish backing up my system is to decide to either update directly from the MAS or to do a clean install. From what I've read a clean install seems pretty easy. I just want to make sure I have everything backed up first. With a "clean" install is that like the rMBP being brand new out of the box basically?
     
  23. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    #23
    Unless you are having problems, doing a clean install makes extra work for no gain. If it ain't broke ...

    You might try another strategy - update to Yosemite the standard way. If you have problems, then do a clean install. If you don't have a problem after the standard update, then you don't need to do the clean install and you have saved time.

    I like to keep things simple. My standard update to Yosemite worked fine, even after several previous updates (Snow Leopard > Lion > Mountain Lion > Mavericks > Yosemite).

    There is one little trick that you can do to facilitate an after-the-fact clean install. When you do the standard update, the first step is downloading the large "installer" file. After that downloads, there will be a pause where you click "continue". At that point, pause to go to the finder and copy the newly-downloaded file "Install OS X Yosemite.app" from your Applications folder to another place - maybe to your desktop or to your documents folder. Then continue the process to install Yosemite. If you lose the screen with the "Continue" button, just launch the aforementioned Install OS X Yosemite.app program.

    After Yosemite is installed, the installer app is automatically removed from the Applications folder. Since you have saved a copy of this installer app to another location, it will be available for you to use later to do a "clean install" if you want, without having to download the huge file again.
     
  24. Spinit14 thread starter macrumors member

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    #24
    Good stuff thanks for the information
     

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