2 Airport Extremes, 2 networks

Tucker28

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Mar 4, 2012
24
17
I don't know if this is possible or not. I have my Time Capsule running my network running behind a 12 Mbps DSL modem. My family in the same house has an Airport Extreme running behind a 1.5 Mbps DSL modem.

Is there any way to connect these two networks without going back out to the internet? If I was using Cisco routers, I could easily do it, but home routers don't let me set IP address per interface.

I know how to hook these up together in the same network. But, this is 2 separate networks... I just want a CAT5 cable connecting them for home networking reasons. I'm thinking it's not possible to do this without real routers, but I wanted to check to be sure.

Thanks for your time!
Scott
 

mfram

macrumors 65816
Jan 23, 2010
1,057
141
San Diego, CA USA
I don't see how you could do this without some kind of router between the two networks. It doesn't have to be a Cisco router, you could do it with a dual-homed Linux/FreeBSD box. But you are going to have to configure that central router to be the DHCP server for both networks so that the machines on each 'side' of the network get the appropriate network configuration to use their proper links to the Internet.

I seriously doubt that the limited DHCP servers in those base stations could be made to do what you want and make the addressing work out.
 

FreakinEurekan

macrumors 68040
Sep 8, 2011
3,395
332
Eureka Springs, Arkansas
Set the DSL router private IP address to 192.168.0.1, configure normally, have it dole out DHCP addresses in the .200 and below range with normal class C subnet mask and gateway address 192.168.0.1 (should be simple config, requires no special features of the router).

Set your personal router to private IP of 192.168.0.254 with DHCP disabled

Manually set up your computer's IP to 192.168.0.201 (outside router #1's DHCP range)' subnet mask 255.255.255.0, and gateway 192.168.0.254 (your private router)

Haven't had my coffee yet, but I think this should do the trick :)
 

paulrbeers

macrumors 68040
Dec 17, 2009
3,960
120
I'm going to ask a stupid question, but what advantage are you going to gain by hooking the two networks together? You said "for home networking reasons", but I'm not sure why. Is it that you want to be able to access your computer connected to the fast DSL from the rest of the Family's network?

I guess, the reason I ask is because I used to have two services when I had an onsite server, but I specifically had the two networks split. The only way I would allow any network traffic on my server/work network was if I personally did it. My server was mission critical.

So this is my question if you want to hook the two networks together, then it can't be mission critical and why not just share one DSL package? And frankly if the family is getting by on a 1.5, that's only 13% of the 12Mbps you have dedicated to yourself, so why not just share? Could you just order say a 15 or 20Mbps package?

Maybe I'm missing something..... Just thinking outside the box. Sometimes it's the alternatives that make the most sense!
 

Jane Colbert

Suspended
Jun 16, 2013
3
0
California
I don't know if this is possible or not. I have my Time Capsule running my network running behind a 12 Mbps DSL modem. My family in the same house has an Airport Extreme running behind a 1.5 Mbps DSL modem.

Is there any way to connect these two networks without going back out to the internet? If I was using Cisco routers, I could easily do it, but home routers don't let me set IP address per interface.

I know how to hook these up together in the same network. But, this is 2 separate networks... I just want a CAT5 cable connecting them for home networking reasons. I'm thinking it's not possible to do this without real routers, but I wanted to check to be sure.

Thanks for your time!
Scott


Well this is an interesting fantasy that i have ever heard from apple users. It seems impossible to get back to the standard location without having internet. you can not use the both routers without airports connections. Cat cables can be connected but let me know if you may successfully done it.
 

marzer

macrumors 65816
Nov 14, 2009
1,329
44
Colorado
Set the DSL router private IP address to 192.168.0.1, configure normally, have it dole out DHCP addresses in the .200 and below range with normal class C subnet mask and gateway address 192.168.0.1 (should be simple config, requires no special features of the router).

Set your personal router to private IP of 192.168.0.254 with DHCP disabled

Manually set up your computer's IP to 192.168.0.201 (outside router #1's DHCP range)' subnet mask 255.255.255.0, and gateway 192.168.0.254 (your private router)

Haven't had my coffee yet, but I think this should do the trick :)
Good plan, but did you mean router #1 DHCP should hand out addresses ABOVE .200 range? So as not to overlap the .201 and .254 manual assignments?
 

drsox

macrumors 65816
Apr 29, 2011
1,474
36
Xhystos
I don't know if this is possible or not. I have my Time Capsule running my network running behind a 12 Mbps DSL modem. My family in the same house has an Airport Extreme running behind a 1.5 Mbps DSL modem.

Is there any way to connect these two networks without going back out to the internet? If I was using Cisco routers, I could easily do it, but home routers don't let me set IP address per interface.

I know how to hook these up together in the same network. But, this is 2 separate networks... I just want a CAT5 cable connecting them for home networking reasons. I'm thinking it's not possible to do this without real routers, but I wanted to check to be sure.

Thanks for your time!
Scott
Do you want these networks to be separate or combined ?
Do you want to continue with 2 modems or just use the fastest ?
Or do you just want both networks to access somethings in common ?
 

Tucker28

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Mar 4, 2012
24
17
I was wanting to keep them separate, except in the case where I wanted to transfer a file to or from their computer, or print something on their printer. I use much more bandwidth than everyone else, which is why I have my own service.

It's not a big deal if I can't do it. And I was fairly sure that I couldn't do this with home routers, since I cannot set specific subnets and IPs per interface. But before I gave up, I wanted to check here just to see. I honestly would just like to do so if I could, so on the situations where we needed to transfer between the two networks, it would be much faster than going out to the internet and then back in the other network. Admittedly, it's mostly the inner geek in me that just wants to do it.

The way I have it now, I have lots more bandwidth, but if I have to print for instance or transfer a file, I have to connect to their network to print or transfer, and then connect back to mine once I'm done. I could go through the net, but it will be much slower then a cable connecting them.

Thanks Again!
Scott
 

drsox

macrumors 65816
Apr 29, 2011
1,474
36
Xhystos
I was wanting to keep them separate, except in the case where I wanted to transfer a file to or from their computer, or print something on their printer. I use much more bandwidth than everyone else, which is why I have my own service.

It's not a big deal if I can't do it. And I was fairly sure that I couldn't do this with home routers, since I cannot set specific subnets and IPs per interface. But before I gave up, I wanted to check here just to see. I honestly would just like to do so if I could, so on the situations where we needed to transfer between the two networks, it would be much faster than going out to the internet and then back in the other network. Admittedly, it's mostly the inner geek in me that just wants to do it.

The way I have it now, I have lots more bandwidth, but if I have to print for instance or transfer a file, I have to connect to their network to print or transfer, and then connect back to mine once I'm done. I could go through the net, but it will be much slower then a cable connecting them.

Thanks Again!
Scott
Maybe the easiest way is to use a local sneaker net and move stuff via a USB stick !

I can see an easy way to link the two together, but then you may need to use a single modem connection if you don't want to get an additional router.