20"ACD or 24" Soyo?

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by dcp063, Dec 2, 2007.

  1. dcp063 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    #1
    I have a 20" ACD and a recently purchased Soyo 24" LCD ($250). I'm selling my system to buy a MBP and was wondering which one i should get rid of. Or should i get rid of both and get a 30" ACD and 15" MBP?
     
  2. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

    Tallest Skil

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    #2
    Dude, congrats! Guess what my two 24" monitors are... Black Friday rules. :cool: As much as I hate to say it, get rid of the ACD. You have full 1080 with the Soyo, and that'll be valuable in five years or so (when 1080 is actually important). You'll love the extra screen space as well. Yeah, I was going to go for a 23" ACD or a 24" w/iSight when they come out, but I couldn't pass up TWO 24s for $500. My Mac Pro will be the envy of my dorm... when I get it. (Please Nehalem before fall '08...)

    Edit: Besides, built-in speakers in the Soyo! I'm gonna be rocking a psuedo-surround effect when I get my Mac Pro!
     
  3. ivan1234 macrumors regular

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  4. InLikeALion macrumors 6502a

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    #4
    What do you do with your computer? if it's anything professional, I'd either keep the ACD or sell both to get a 23" or 30" ACD. That Soyo is in no way going to have as good a panel or calibration as the apple. If you get the 23" or the 30" you will have that precious 1080p the previous poster was worshipping, only in a lot better quality. Plus the apple will have a much better resell value in the future.

    The only way I'd say keep the Soyo would be if it has certain connections you need if you are going to use it for connecting gaming systems, and will ultimately just be using the display casually, i.e. not for professional work you make a living with.
     
  5. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

    Tallest Skil

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    #5
    WOAH! Keep your pants on, sonny-jim! Worshipping?! I mentioned it because having 1080p now is important to some people. If it's not your bag, that's fine; I personally couldn't care less. It's more about real estate than anything else. Eventually there will be a line drawn at needed size, but there may not be at functionality. Sure, you'll lose some of the resale value you'd have with a Cinema Display, but there's always someone out there... Why even talk about selling now; he's just bought it! I say keep the Soyo for the screen space and speakers and sell the ACD. Again, Apple resells for higher than any other manufacturer, you'll GET more back than if you get rid of the Soyo.
     
  6. InLikeALion macrumors 6502a

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    #6
    I'm not attacking you - worshiping was perhaps too strong a word. I said it because recommending a Soyo with undoubtedly inferior quality over the smaller ADC puts precedence only on the 1080p res and not at all on what the quality is or what his needs are. That's a pretty drastic recommendation to make withouth being well informed of his needs. This is why I both asked what he used it for and also recommend he go the route he suggested himself which was to sell both monitors and get a 23" or 30" ACD. That would give him a professional quality display and 1080p resolution.

    If he does professional design or even sd video editing, the ADC quality will be more beneficial to him than the Soyo.

    Lets just be friends and not fight...?
     
  7. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

    Tallest Skil

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    #7
    You're absolutely right: an ADC will have better overall panel quality in every circumstance always (yeah, THAT'S not evangelism...:rolleyes:). If he's a gamer, though, I'd say the Soyo for response time and... um... speakers. :p

    Again,

    20" ACD: Professional work, anything truly important

    24" Soyo: Gaming, light stuff, realty

    Realty was one of my points, and some people take pride in their "souped-up" 1080p's. :rolleyes: It's funny; dcp063 hasn't even posted again and we're telling him what he does for a living. Yawp. Bygones are bygones...
     
  8. koobcamuk macrumors 68040

    koobcamuk

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  9. dcp063 thread starter macrumors member

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    Sep 30, 2007
    #9
    re:

    I do use my G5 for professional stuff, though most work is done at my job...dont feel like doing more work once i get home.

    I'm thinking about getting rid of both monitors with my G5 and getting a 30" dell ultrasharp when i get my MBP. performance wise, the dell measures up to the ACD, correct?
     
  10. dante@sisna.com macrumors 6502a

    dante@sisna.com

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    #10
    The Dell is a nice monitor: you should also look at the HP LP3065. It has excellent reviews, price and features. Both compare nicely to the ACD 30"

    See this HP review and how it compares to the Dell at:

    http://www.anandtech.com/displays/showdoc.aspx?i=2950

    I am in the process of buying a new monitor right now myself. A second 30" for my studio. I will probably buy the HP LP3065 as we already have a 30" ACD. The HP needs calibration to get its gamut and contrast under control for print work.

    I can HONESTLY say that I have spent 6 hours researching monitors during the past 48 hours and probably 20 hours over the past two years.

    The only 30" that comes close to the ACD is the HP LP3065 or the newer Dell 30" high gamut.

    In the 23" or 24" areas (really these are both the same) the HP Smart Buy, the Dell 27 and the Dell 24, as well as a higher end Samsung Panel (PVA) are contenders but again, BOTH the 20" and 23" APPLE ACD's are at the TOP of their game even compared to these contenders.

    Before you flame me back, really do the work and the research -- compare specs and prices -- and you will learn the truth about monitors: newer does not mean better given the current state of technology.
     

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