2007 MacBook CPU Temperature

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by sojha, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. sojha macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    #1
    Hey everyone,

    Is it normal for a Mid-2007 MacBook fitted with a 2.16GHz Core 2 Duo processor to be running at 135 degrees F when it there is nothing but Safari with 3 tabs open? None of the tabs in Safari are video or anything intensive. There's also Dropbox and a few small things as well open.

    I'm thinking about going in and replacing the thermal compound.

    Thanks
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    Yes, it's normal. Your temps are on the low side, in fact. Your Mac is not overheating. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel) If you're not already using it, iStat Pro will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If they're spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  3. sojha thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    #3
    Yeah, I'm using iStat Pro to monitor it. I just opened a YouTube video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XITHbsUUlYI) and ran it in HD 1080P and the processor temp jumped to 190 F. Still normal?
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    Yes, Flash is notorious for consuming system resources and driving up temps. Your temps are still well within safe operating limits. Check the Flash recommendations at the end of my last post for ways to possibly improve that.
     
  5. sojha thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    #5
    Alright sounds good. Also, my battery which is now 5 years old with 1335 cycles is at 82.8% health, but when it gets low, my mac just randomly shuts off. Is this normal? I've reset my PRAM but it doesn't really help.
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #6
    First, PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with battery/power/charging issues. Resetting it will not help.

    How often have you calibrated your battery? See the instructions in the CALIBRATION section of the following link. This should answer most, if not all, of your battery questions:
     
  7. sojha thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    #7

    Yes but sometimes, I don't even see the "low battery" warning anymore.

    I used to calibrate often but after 5 years I stopped haha...wasn't this battery originally rated for only 300 cycles? Mine's at 1335.
     
  8. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #8
    Yes, it was. Calibration would make your readings more accurate. I suspect your battery health is lower than 82%. If you've gotten that many cycles, out of it, regardless of the health, I'd say you've gotten your money's worth!
     
  9. sojha thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    #9
    Haha I definitely have. This battery originally held 5020 mAh, so I thought I'd buy a 3rd party with 5200 mAh. Bad idea- I wasted 25 dollars and it didn't do half as well as this 5 year old one.

    So other than the fact that it's old, is there any way to improve the battery instead of buying a new one? I'm planning on getting a 2nd generation R-MBP in 2013 when Haswell processors come out, but I want to finish this off the best I can.

    I expect my battery life to go down more tomorrow because I'm installing a new 720 GB HD/SSD hybrid drive from Seagate.

    I'm not even sure if it's lower than 82%. I did a calibration back in February and it was in the 90%s afterwards.
     
  10. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #10
    There's no way to restore the health, but proper calibration will at least give you a more accurate idea of its condition. The BATTERY LIFE FROM A CHARGE section of the FAQ will give you some ideas on maximizing battery life, which may help you keep it limping along until you're ready to buy new.
     

Share This Page