Price Advice 2010 3.33GHz 6-Core Mac Pro 16GB RAM 256GB SSD Blu-Ray RE

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by 3282868, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. 3282868 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2009
    #1
    I'd welcome any advice :)

    I have a 2010 3.33GHz 6-Core Mac Pro with AppleCare that runs through October. I usually sell my Mac's before the AppleCare runs out, then upgrade. Since the new model isn't out yet, I've held off but have to sell ASAP before AppleCare expires as buyers almost always use it to check new systems.

    My system is running without any issues. Below are specs with attached screen shots (also will include Adobe CS6 and/or CC, Final Cut Pro 7 and/or 10.0.x, AutoCAD, and a ton more).

    - 3.33GHz 6-Core
    - 16GB DDR3 RAM
    - 256GB SATA III SSD OWC Mercury EXTREME Pro 6G
    - CalDigit PCIe USB 3 w/ 2 USB ports
    - ATI Radeon HD 5770 1GB
    - LG Blu-Ray RE w/ Lightscribe
    - OS X 10.9 w/ iLife, iWork preinstalled
    - MS Office 2011
     

    Attached Files:

  2. aloshka macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
  3. Macsonic macrumors 65816

    Macsonic

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Location:
    Earth
    #3
    Maybe around $2400 - $2700 and if cosmetic condition is very good If you try to sell it at $3000 may be slow to sell or buyers may tend to go for the 12 core instead.
     
  4. Nightarchaon macrumors 65816

    Nightarchaon

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    #4
    if i had that, id keep it and avoid the new mac-pro like the plague that it is.

    Unless you want to be stuck with non-upgradeable R2-D2 clone with no serviceable parts and a huge bill for all the thunderbolt gear your going to have to buy.

    Personally i built a new PC and followed this guide (went with Mountain Lion, but ready to upgrade later this month to mavericks)

    http://www.insanelymac.com/forum/topic/290187-a-guide-to-mavericks-on-asus-z87-deluxe-4770k/

    Now i have a thunderbolt equipped mac-pro/windows 8.1 dual boot, with SLI 670s for Cuda power, oodles of storage, and simple upgradability.. couldn't ask for more. (also the whole PC cost me less than the i7 27" imac does, let alone the price of a specced up new mac pro so WIN !)
     
  5. Macsonic macrumors 65816

    Macsonic

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Location:
    Earth
    #5
    Just to add some inputs, if you are planning to buy the new cylinder Mac Pro, best to hang on to your tower 3.33ghz hexcore Mac Pro. Since the new 2013 MPro is a new architecture and untested for any glitches both software and hardware. But personaly I would keep using the tower Mac Pro as it has served my needs well
     
  6. 3282868, Oct 21, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013

    3282868 thread starter macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2009
    #6
    That's the caveat I'm facing, I'm very torn on the "new" Mac Pro.

    As others mentioned, I dislike the lack up upgradability, size, forced external device support, limited PCIe, one CPU and built in graphics. Tech changes very quickly, if Thunderbolt 2.0 supports upgrades externally (graphics box, etc), I wouldn't mind. Yet being forced to place my internals (4 SATA HDD's, Blu-Ray RE, SSD boot, etc) into expensive Thunderbolt chassises seems pointless and adds further expenses to what seems an already expensive system on base parts alone.

    One CPU w/ a powerful GPU means OpenGL dependency and OS X is playing catch up even w/ 10.9. I suppose if the price points stay relatively the same and proper benchmarks show GPU power to be extremely beneficial over what we've already seen, it may be worth it.

    My only fear is AppleCare running out. I've never sold a system without AppleCare as almost every buyer I've done business wants the comfort in knowing the system can be brought in and repaired. This adds value to the sale which will be lost. I also don't want to own a system without it and once 3 years is up, you're SOL. :(

    I've made Hackint0shes many times, with boot loaders now being so simple, it's a matter of pulling together the right parts. I have no issue with it as it is almost always cheaper (unless using true Xeon and not i7's, etc). It's just been easier as I've sold my systems.

    I have friends/ex-coworkers back in Cupertino who have promised me their 25%'s on the system, so I was hoping to break even. If the base system is somehow priced well (highly doubtful from what we've seen), and outperforms with GPU power kicking in with CPU, I wouldn't mind. My needed components would be external, just swap out the unit every three years. If not, this would be the first time in about a decade I would not have upgraded my pro-system.

    ...and thanks everyone, I greatly appreciate all your advice and help and agree with all of it. Sorry for the long reply.
     
  7. aloshka macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    #7
    That's probably true, but I think a lot of people are disappointed in the new Mac Pro design, so it might keep the values of the older ones pretty high.
     
  8. Macsonic macrumors 65816

    Macsonic

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Location:
    Earth
    #8
    Hi Aloshka. Yep you're correct. I prefer the current older tower Mac Pro with internal expansion. Pricing and extended costs were also a deciding factor for me. Buying the new Mac Pro would also entail spending also on external expansion from scratch. Even before the June 12 WWDC sneak preview of the new Mac Pro, I decided to purchase the older tower Mac Pro. Had a feeling Apple will not include internal expansion and will embed processor and GPU in the logicboard.:)
     
  9. Phildo macrumors member

    Phildo

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    #9
    So, wait at least six months.

    If your current Mac Pro was going to break then it would have done so by now. The chances of it failing now are quite minimal.

    A 3.33GHz Mac Pro is a very, very, very good Mac... that will have at least another year or two of good life in it.

    If you keep if for another year, then the depreciation during that time will be minimal. Whereas, the depreciation on a new Mac Pro will be significant.
     

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